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THE UNIVERSITY 5TENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKM VN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 






MEN S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

* * HARNESS, 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

BLANKETS, ETC. REPMING ™» PILY ME - 

Waukegan, III. 



Chicago's Leading Religions Weekly* 

Good 

r „- The c 1 « , 

^interior! ounoay 
Reading 

For Sale at beivstands. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

TRegtauraut ano 
Cboice Confectioner?, 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER - 



choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



HEALER IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



marble and granite monuments, 
building stone, lime and cement, 
sewer pipe, drain tile, etc. . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



JUL ABBOTT &C0. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING. 

J. G. Cornish, 



DEALER IN" 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, • 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND MANUFACTURER OF 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 
Waukegan. III. 

BERTS, 



jSJ ORMAN J. I 



DENTAL 
SURGEON 



WAUKEGAN 



ILL. 



THO o. F. HOWE, 

Practical 

PLUMBEI * GAS FITTER, 



WORK A SPECIALTY. 



SANITAF 

LAK FOREST, ILL. 



r/a- 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1893 



No. 1 



THE JOKER.-A CHARACTER STUDY. 



Well, I suppose every town most in the country has 
its queer one — some poor, half-witted odd-fellow to 
furnish fun for the others and to kind of show them 
off the better — by contrast, I suppose — or may be 
God's punishment for a parent's sin. 

Back in the old days before the war our little town 
here had its character, too — and he was a character, 
poor fellow. You could have seen him trudging along 
kicking up little clouds of dust that covers the road out 
there in hot weather, and every now and then tittering 
away to himself as if he was the happiest creature 
round about. His clothes weren't much, old and faded, 
but never ragged, and he had a faculty of keeping his 
hands and face clean, and his face had an honest look 
to it. 

We boys got to calling him " The Joker." Per- 
haps I started it. God knows, I wish I hadn't, if it 
ever gave him any pain. You see, he had a strange 
habit of snickering and tittering like a silly school-boy 
when you spoke to him, and try hard as he would he 
could not control it and look you square in the eye, but 
would hang his head and turn half away as he strove 
to answer, in spite of his giggling. 

Then he' d hurry away, with his face and ears 
burning with shame, and some s»id he always had a 
tear in his eye afterwards. He lived over yonder 
That little house where the smoke is coming up. He- 
and his mother, a sweet little old lady, who thought 
her boy a wonderful fellow and bright as a dollar, tried 
hard to make a parson of him. Once, they say, he 
actually did start out to make one by trying to pray out 
loud at meeting, with his dear old mother by his side 
holding his hand and gently urging him on. Well, he 
started, stopped, and started again. Then as if the 
occasion were too much for him, he laughed, and the 
harder he tried to pray the worse he tittered, and finally 
they say he sat down, saying " He didn't mean nothing 
disrespectful," and burying his hands in his face cried 
and laughed aloud. Hysterics? Yes; guess they were. 
We didn't call them that in those days. 

He gave up trying to be a parson. Anyway he 
reckoned a man wouldn't make a good parson who 
loved a horse. Love horses ? Well, I guess he did ; 
and they loved him, too. There seemed to be a kind 
of feeling between them, and they knew he didn't 
mean anything when he laughed. He was the best 
horse trainer in our county, and many the wild, raring 
colt he broke with never a cuss word or a blow. Why, 
he handled those animals just as a woman does her 
babe, and then his eyes would flash, his lips draw 
down, his face would flush, and he looked every inch a 



man and master; but after it was all over he'd hurry 
away to avoid acting silly before you. 

He was just as gentle with folks, and mother said 
many a time that he was better than most women folks 
she knew of, and our section was noted for its nurses 
then. And once when Mary here and Babe was near 
death's door he brought the child back to life, and 
Mary — why, Mary thought the world of the old Joker, 
as women folks will when you do anything for their 
children, and Babe liked him better than her dad. And 
he used to come to the house real often. 

One night I had been down to the squire's drinking 
— I don't drink now — and the boys had been twitting 
me about the Joker and my wife and all that, and soon 
between the liquor and the coarse jokes I was most 
crazed and started home swearing like a trooper. But 
I kind of got cooled down by the time I had reached 
the house and sent the horses to barn, else I might have 
killed him then. I went in round by the kitchen door 
and saw Mary hustling about her work as she always 
does and the Joker sitting on a chair swinging Babe 
high in the air. I flared up in an instant and asked him 
what the devil he was hanging round my wife for, and 
Mary, looking pale and scared, tried to quiet me. 
Slowly the Joker put Babe down and stood up there. 
Then he snickered, and I struck him, and as he lay I 
kicked him once, twice — yes, three times, and then 
Mary drew me back. He got up slowly and fumbled 
about for his hat, and standing in the doorway very 
straight, with the blood running down his pale face, he 
said: "Josh, I didn't mean nuthing, and I don't see 
what you want to hit me for — and — and Josh, I '11 
never come again," and, with a look at Babe, he left. 

Well, he never did call again, and between Mary 
and I there was a coolness for many a week, and Babe 
cried herself sick for her old playmate she missed so. 

Soon after the war broke out, and I and Jerry Black 
and the boys, and the Joker, too, enlisted. After the 
novelty wore off camp life got pretty monotonous, 
'cept just before a fight, and we spent many an hour 
thinking up pranks together to play on fellows, and the 
old Joker came in for more than his share, and Jerry 
Black and I were at the bottom of most of them. 
But he stood it all with unfailing good nature and was 
forever returning good for evil, heaping coals of fire, 
as the Bible says. 

One day some horses were sent down to camp, and 
somehow Jerry got in among them, and one vicious 
black brute had him by the shoulder like a flash and 
threw him to the ground and was pawing his life out, 
when, like a shadow, the Joker was in among those 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



horses, and, with his hands at the brute's head, drew 
the horse back, all quiet and trembling, and we pulled 
Jerry out. 

About that time, at the end of the first year, the 
fighting was coming along pretty thick, and we kind of 
got so we couldn't sleep well without the hum and 
cracks and noise of the firing. 

One day, as luck would have it, I got hold of some 
real whiskey, and I didn't let the boys know, except I 
looked for Jerry, but he was off with a party. You 
see, we were closing in on them, and expected a battle 
most any day. Well, I got beastly drunk, and before 
I sobered up even the fever had me. There wasn't 
any room in the hospitals for a man with just the fever, 
and I might have fared pretty bad, only the boy6 
helped me out a bit; but they were too busy to stay 
long, except the Joker, who stayed with me and nursed 
me like a mother. I remember coming to several 
times and finding him by my side holding my head up, 
that I might drink, and all so gentle and soft-like. 
And they say he stayed with me a night, a day, a night 
and a day, dozing when he could, and the last night 
they doubled the sentinels and called him out. They 
were expecting an attack any hour. 

Toward morning they found him asleep on the 
ground, his gun out of his hands. 

You know what a court-martial is. Well, they had 
Joker up, and even before the camp was through laugh- 
ing to think how he 'd be scared. But some of them 
took it serious and sent in a petition, but it was all 
rushed through in a hurry. They said up at headquar- 
ters it was for example. Well, perhaps we needed it, 
but they needn't have taken the best man in camp for 
it. You know how it 's done — the choosing of lots, 
and all that. Jerry Black drew first lot, they said, and 
turned white 's a sheet and liked to have fallen, and all 
the while I lay unconscious. 

You know the rest — the march, the coffin, the 
chaplain, and all; the men drawn up in a half-circle, 
standing with down-cast eyes and bent heads, and Jerry 
like a dazed man. The Joker stood there, they say, 
with his arms tied behind him and a half-frightened 
expression on his face, as though he was trying hard to 
find what it was all about and whether or not it wasn't 
one of Jerry's jokes. They hadn't tied his eyes. He 
" kind er wished they wouldn't." They say he spoke: 
" I don't see what you want to shoot me for. I never 
done nuthin'." And after 'that he sent a message to 
his mother, saying, " He 'd never tease her for cookies 
any more or drink the milk she was a saving for 
the cream." And he asked Jerry to take care of old 
Bess, his horse. Then he half turned and broke into 
that awful pathetic, silly little laugh. Then came the 
low command. Every one of 'em prayed that he 
might have the blank shot, but their prayers couldn't 
o' reached heaven, for the dear old Joker fell with 
scarce a moan, half in and half out his coffin, and the 



red blood spurted out on the piece of cloth pinned over 
his heart. 

When I got round again I noticed a good many 
faces missing, and as it was after a big battle I s'mised 
where they were, and I thought the Joker had fallen 
naturally, too. I felt kind of sorry for his old mother 
and wished I hadn't played jokes on him. 

I noticed Jerry Black acted strange and shunned 
every one with head bent down, like a thief with a 
conscience. One clay I thought I'd find out, and asked 
Jerry to come over and have a drink at the sutler's. 
But he looked crazy-like and backed off, and I took 
him by the shoulder and made him tell me all. 

He's taking care of the farm for the Joker's mother 
now. 

Why, drat me, I believe I'm crying; and you, too, 
Mary. Shame! Just like a woman. 

Fred Ames Hayner. 



THE MISSION OF THE COLLEGE PAPER. 

FROM A KIND BUT KEEN CRITIC. 

The aims of a college paper should be: First, to 
pay its way; second, to furnish news and criticism to 
its patrons; third, to promote the interests of the insti- 
tution at which it is conducted. To accomplish the 
first end a good business head in charge of advertising, 
subscriptions and collections is essential, but he will 
hardly succeed in securing and retaining that financial 
basis of every newspaper — good advertising — unless 
the paper is properly conducted in other respects. Ad- 
vertisers are quick to discover that their medium is or 
is not a successful journal of the class to which it be- 
longs. The college paper should furnish genuine 
views and worthy criticism. Its field of news islargely 
local and largely educational or scholastic, and its locals 
should be in the main educational, and its educational 
topics largely local. For the most part it will chron- 
icle the life of the local college. It is a mistake to 
compose this chronicle of personal items to any extent. 
These only gratify a feeble individual vanity and have 
no interest to the majority of readers. What should 
be chronicled? The career of the college — any 
changes in its policy or curriculum or staff. The work 
of the faculty, any contributions to journals or period- 
icals, should be followed and noted, independently, and 
not by hearsaj from the parties interested. The 
weekly meetings of the literary societies should be re- 
ported in brief digest. Lectures given in the town 
should be similarly treated. All the above matters 
should be given not in mere mention; they should be 
reported with judicious selection and comment. The 
work of reporting outside contests — literary or elocu 
tionary — in which our students have participated, or 
games In which our teams have borne a part, has been 
so well done in the past by our Lake Forest papers 
that the only suggestion needed here is that all other 
reporting be done as carefully and as critically. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Outside news from other colleges should be handled. 
Changes in policy or curriculum, happenings of note 
of any kind should be given a place, so that touch may 
be had with the larger life of the collegiate world. On 
the other hand, local events not collegiate may find a 
place. Matters which affect the whole community 
should be selected, however, and outside criticism may 
occasionally find a useful place. An article in one of 
our papers last season by a citizen concerning the kill- 
ing of unmuzzled dogs, dealing as it did with niceties 
of the law, was of interest to every student of legal 
turn of mind. Larger matters than the bounds of the 
town or of all collegiate life can reach may be handled 
effectively. Mr. Danfoith's interview of Stanley some 
years ago as he rode from Chicago to Milwaukee was a 
neat bit of work for The Stentor, and the same paper 
made a brilliant stroke when it gave all Lake Forest 
the first news of Cleveland's second election. 

Finally, reporting should be accurate and criticism 
discerning. The paper is to stand for the student life, 
but it should represent the student life at its best, its 
maturest, its coolest, its fairest. The sensational re- 
porter rushes in where the college scribe should dare 
not to tread. If the paper is to lead college opinion 
and make it forceful it should have as its motto, " Be 
sure you 're right, and then go ahead." 

J. J. Halsey. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS. 

We have just received from Ginn & Co., Boston, 
a copy of " Graduate Courses, a Handbook for Gradu- 
ate Students." .The credit of this new venture is due 
to the Graduate Club of Harvard. A committee from 
the Harvard club, assisted by committees from Cornell, 
Johns Hopkins and Yale, has made a compilation of the 
graduate courses of eleven of our largest universities, 
and arranged the courses in the different departments 
ready for comparison. The editors are conscious that 
the scope is limited, that other schools have special de- 
partments, but it is a move in the right direction and an 
honest effort to secure heartier co-operation between 
American schools, particularly in the requirements for 
the higher degrees. The schools considered are: Bryn 
Mawr, Chic.igo, Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns 
Hopkins, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Princeton and Yale. 
That graduate students and facilities for graduate work 
aae constantly increasing is shown by this little book, 
which we heartily commend. 



THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Dental Department of the University, the Chi- 
cago College of Dental Surgery, as it is called, will not 
open until the last of October. The delay is caused by 
the unfinished condition of the new building. When 
it is completed, the Dental Department will have one 
of the finest buildings in the city. It will be a fitting 
home for the school, which under the guidance of Dr. 
Truman W. Brophy, the dean, has become the leading 
college of its kind in the West. 



ATHLETICS. 

FOOT-BALL. 

The foot-ball season is once more upon us and every 
night the players may be seen hard at work. The out- 
look is not as good as it was last year. Then we had 
back nearly all the old regulars and a couple of subs 
from the year before. This year only six players have 
returned. However there is material for just as good a 
team as we had last year, and besides, it is generally the 
case that when there is a good deal of new material to 
develop, the team works harder and comparatively bet- 
ter results are gained. The old men now at work are 
McGaughey, Woolsey, Hayner, captain ; Hunt, Williams 
and D. Jackson. Then of last year's subs arc II. Thorn 
and C. Thorn. This leaves one end, a half back, a 
tackle and quarter to be filled. Adams is working hard 
for quarter. He does good work, for a new hand, and 
will very likely get the position. Lee, a new man, and 
C. Thorn are working for heavy half. Thorn has the 
advantage of having played before. He is a good 
tackle and bucks well, but is too slow to be of any 
account in the interference. Lee is a fast man, and if 
he will practice hard, will make a fine player. There 
are several candidates for end, among whom Cragin 
and Rice have the best prospects. Other men who 
show up well are Fales, Williams, Portier, North, 
Campbell and Gilleland. There are several whose 
names are not mentioned, but who play very well, and 
a good scrub team ought to be gotten together. 

The dates for games already secured are as follows: 
With Chicago University, at Chicago, October 14th; 
with Wisconsin University, at Madison, November iSth; 
with University of Illinois, Thanksgiving Day, at 
Champaign. Correspondence is now being carried on 
with a view to securing home games. 

TRACK ATHLETICS. 

During last }"ear, when the interest in base-ball was 
at a low point, track athletics were becoming more 
prominent. Our school had never won any points be- 
fore in an intercollegiate field day. Last year, how- 
ever, we got several. Five of the winners in last 
Spring's intercollegiate field day at Champaign were 
chosen to represent the Chicago Athletics during the 
summer and in the great Columbian meet. Among 
these was our mile-runner, Mr. L. W. Rossiter, who 
took second in the two-mile handicap and third in the 
mile championship against such men as Orton, Conncff 
and Walsh. He is now champion of the West, as he 
defeated the former champion at Cleveland. If we 
want to hold up our end this year, we will have to get 
every man out who can do anything at all on field or 
track. A good plan would be to get up some inter- 
class field day, such as they have in eastern schools. 
This would arouse enthusiasm and get men out who 
might never be known otherwise. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



J 



Harry L. Bird, '94 
W. B. Hunt, '94, 

A. O. Jackson, '96, 
David Fales, '96, 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 
Miss Lucia Clark, 
Miss Louise Conger, 
S. E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, ) 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 
C B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Locals 

Town 

- Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

- Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$1.50 
.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, III., as second-class matter. 

" To all to whom these presents come, greeting! " 

IT is a little late to welcome our readers, old 
and new, to Lake Forest; so if you feel at 
home by this time you can reverse the process 
and extend a welcome to The University 
Stentor. It is hardly necessary for us to 
make a long editorial inaugural, for the plan 
and scope of the college weekly are pretty 
well understood. The form has been enlarged, 
and we trust improved. Old readers will 
notice a slight change in the title, though it is 
not really a change in fact, as the legal name 
of the paper has always been the Lake Forest 
University Stentor. These changes were 
deemed advisable, because it is intended to 
make this journal more than ever before, a 
a true university organ, and because The 
University Stentor is, in a sense, the suc- 
cessor of two other publications — The Red and 
Black and The Stentor. Just before school 
closed last year a combination was effected 
(into the details of which we need not enter), 
so that now this paper represents the united 
forces of last year's journalistic rivals. 

The delay in the appearance of this first 
issue may be briefly explained. Last year 



both papers had "an uphill climb," financially- 
and the final balances were on the wrong side 
of the ledger. The business affairs of The 
Stentor especially were in a very unsettled con- 
dition, and it required considerable time to get 
matters straightened out. However, arrange- 
ments have been made, so that the finances 
will now move smoothly. 

The co-operation of all will be needed to 
make The University Stentor a success. 
The paper is not run for the aggrandizement 
of the stockholders, but for the best interests 
of the institution as a whole. No factions will 
be favored, but fair treatment accorded to all 
parties. Those in charge wish to have it 
understood that The University Stentor is 
not their paper, but the student's paper, in the 
full sense of the word. 

# 
* * 

THE COLLEGE READING-ROOM. 

THERE is one department which seems to 
hardly have kept pace with the many im- 
provements noticeable in the College this year, 
and that is the reading-room. True, it has 
been moved from its old cramped quarters to 
a larger place, but the increased size of the 
room only makes the scarcity of reading 
matter the more apparent. A few monthly 
magazines, some scattering weeklies, and one 
lonely daily paper make up the list at present 
writing. To remedy this deficiency the librar- 
ian is in the habit of sending around a repre- 
sentative to solicit subscriptions of the students 
and faculty in order to provide illustrated 
papers, etc. In other words, the college fur- 
nishes about half of the reading room and ex- 
pects the students to supply the rest — or go 
without. Now, we appeal to the judgment of 
the Trustees, or whoever has the matter in 
charge, and ask if this is not an evidence of 
extreme parsimony? Would it not be almost 
as reasonable to ask students to help stock the 
library as to expect them to fill up the reading- 
room? When a student comes here for an 
education, he expects to find the necessary 
apparatus provided, and that apparatus, to our 
mind, includes facilities for general culture as 
afforded by a reading-room well stocked with 
all the leading periodicals. This method of 
begging pennies may have been perfectly 
proper in the early 8o's, but it seems a little 
out of place nowadays. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



LOCAL NEWS. 

THE COLLEGE. 

Quite a number of the fellows were well soaked in 
the heavy rain of last week, but we were all so glad to 
see the rain that we didn't mind a little wetting. The 
unusually long drought this summer shows its effects 
on the campus. The grass, usually at this time of year 
quite fresh-looking, is literally burned up. 

" Ye ancient game of funnell " was worked upon 
several unsuspecting victims on Friday evening. The 
onlookers enjoyed the sport immensely. 

A World's Fair Y. M. C. A. Congress is to be held in 
Chicago, commencing Oct. 6.' Among the leading 
speakers mentioned for the meeting is our president, 
Dr. Coulter. The regular state convention of the 
Y. M. C. A. will be held this year at Elgin. One day 
of the meeting will be given up to athletic contests. It 
is to be hoped that we will be represented at the meet- 
ing. This year we will not be represented in Illinois 
inter-collegiate athletics at all. It is to be deplored 
that we are so restricted financially as to be unable to 
send contestants to these meets. 

Prof. B. (in Greek class): " You may take the first 
seven verses for your lesson." 

New Man: " How many lines will that be, Prof.?" 

The officers of '96 are as follows: Pres., D. H. 
Jackson; Vice-Pres., Marie Skinner; Secy.-Treas., 
M. Woolsey; Sergeant-at-Arms, J. M. Vance. 

It would be a decided impetus to foot-ball and bring 
out a larger number of men who might afterwards be- 
come available material, if class foot-ball teams were 
formed. Some arrangement should be made whereby 
the games could be played before the cold weather 
sets in. 

The societies are hustling for new members, and 
the new men, while being worked themselves, are inci- 
dentally working the societies for all the good things 
they can from each. 

In former years the eating clubs have as a rule been 
situated at long distances from the College. This year 
the reverse is the order, both Academia and Mitchell 
Hall being used as eating halls by the members of the 
respective societies. 

It has been reported that steam will be turned on in 
the gymnasium only two days in the week during the 
fall season. This order should be changed. The heat- 
ing of the gymnasium is a matter of great importance 
to the foot-ball team. Having to dress in cold and 
damp quarters will do more harm to the team than any- 
thing else. The bath rooms are limited in number, and 
this inconvenience is increased if they are available only 
two days in the week. " Senator " Fry is respectfully 
requested to be more liberal with his steam. 



The Illinois Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Association 
will hold its annual contest at Galesburg, under the 
auspices of Knox College, on Friday evening, Oct. 6th. 
Mr. A. P. Bourns is Lake Forest's representative, and 
will no doubt do her honor, for he is a pleasing speaker, 
with strong convictions. His subject is an interesting 
one:—" Henry W. Grady and His Negro Policy." We 
extend to Mr. Bourns our best wishes for his success. 

The Athenian Society gave a very pleasant recep- 
tion in their hall on Saturday evening last. Notwith- 
standing the disagreeable weather the attendance was 
good. An unique and exceedingly beautiful feature 
was the decoration of the outer hallway, which, with 
the aid of autumn leaves and colored lanterns was 
made to present the appearance of a sylvan bower. 
The genial Mr. Peter Williams presided at the refresh- 
ment table. The thanks of those present are due the 
Society for an enjoyable evening. 

Among recent visitors were Miss Beach and Miss 
McKenzie, both ex '94, and Alex Wilson, '92, N. H, 
Burdick, R. H. Crozier and E. H. McNeal. 

At the Young People's Missionary meeting last 
Sunday evening, Dr. Coulter gave a brief and admir- 
able presentation of Persia as the battlefield of great 
religions. 

The students welcomed Dr. McClure after his ex- 
tended trip through British Columbia, Alaska and the 
Ye.lowstone, Park on the second Sunday of the term. 

The Junior young ladies received the young gentle- 
men of the class on Monday evening, October 2nd, in 
the Aletheian Hall. 

Rev. Wm. Elsing, a former Academy student, will 
address the usual Wednesday evening prayer meeting 
on his work among the Jews of New York City 

The piano in the chapel it a great improvement over 
the old organ. 

The present economic condition of our country 
must have aroused a lively interest in the minds of a 
great many students, as Prof. Halsey's class in Econ- 
omics is the largest in the college. 

J. Z. Johnson has entered the Senior class. From 
present indications that class will outnumber last year's 
graduating class. 

The college dormitory is much better filled than last 
year. 

Three freshmen, Baker, Morrison and Craigin, are 
rooming at Mrs. Glen Wood's. 

Rush Medical College opened Wednesday, Sept. 
27, with 526 students. 

The Zeta Epsilon Society has issued invitations for 
a musicale, which will take the place of their regular 
programme, next Friday evening. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



AMONG THE PROFESSORS. 

Professors Halsey, Dawson, McNeil and Stuart 
spent most of their time last summer in Lake Forest 
looking after Senator Fry and visiting the World's 
Fair between times. 

Professors Harper and Lacy passed a large part of 
their vacation at Woodshole, Mass., studying in the 
marine biological science laboratories of that place. 
This center of biological studies was started by a Bos- 
ton society and draws advanced students every summer 
from all over the United States. The professors re- 
port a very pleasant as well as profitable summer. 

Professors Thomas and Stanley wei - e out camping in 
northern Michigan, near Mackinaw, taking with them 
many of the common luxuries of modern life, for in- 
stance a piano. 

Professor Schmidt, who formerly taught in 
the Academy for two years, and during the 
past three years has been teaching at Northwestern 
University, is one of the latest acquisitions to our fac- 
ulty. Most of his summer was spent in teaching and 
tutoring in Evanston. Six weeks, however, of the va- 
cation was used in fishing, most of the time in Minne- 
sota streams for black bass. 

Truly Lake Forest has sent out a few great men, 
and still more are to be on the roll. Among these latter 
Prof. Jack is setting a great pace. Graduating in 'S4, 
he spent the next three years in Princeton Seminary, 
and then for the next year and a half he studied in 
Germany, returning thus soon on account of ill-health. 
For the past two years he has been teaching in our 
Academy. Now as a college professor his classes are 
deservedly popular. 

Professor Bridgman has been spending the summer 
with New Haven friends in Greensboro, Vermont. 
This was his third vacation in that place. 

Professor Walter Smith has kept cool for about 
eight weeks in Nova Scotia and vicinity. 

Mr. Seymour, '92, of Ann Arbor, now our instruc- 
tor of chemistry, has been doing postgraduate and 
tutoring work in his alma mater during the past year. 

President Coulter's herbarium in the old Academy 
building is in charge of two post-graduate students, 
Mr. Uline and Mr, Bray. Mr. Uline has had consid- 
erable school life, teaching three years previous to his 
college course, and after graduating at Indiana Univer- 
sity in '92, spending a year there as a post-graduate and 
tutor. Mr. Bray is a '93 man, also of Indiana Univer- 
sity. He spent six years before his college course in 
teaching in the public schools. 

The recitation rooms of the college department are 
scattered more than ever this year. Profs. Dawson, 
Locy, Stevens and Seymour are in the college building. 
The old reading-room is now the president's offlce, 
while Prof. Morris' room makes a great improvement 
on the old as a reading-room. The library now occu- 
pies all of what used to be President Roberts' lecture 
room. Profs. McNeil, Thomas and Smith hold sway 



on the first floor of the old Academy building, with the 
book-store in the old Academy office and the librarian 
in the west end of the building. Profs. Stuart, Bridg- 
man and Harper are in the basement of the Art build- 
ing, Prof. Halsey in the southeast room of the main 
floor, with Profs. Jack and Schmidt in the gallery 
rooms. 

Lake Forest is now a center for botanical study and 
publication. President Coulter is one of six great 
botanists who are revising and correcting previous 
botanical publications. They intend to publish in a 
few years a complete work in that study, to be the 
most complete and exact of its kind. The business 
office of the leading botanical periodical published, 
" The Botanical Gazette," has been located in this 
place. This journal was founded by Dr. Coulter 
while at Hanover in 1S75. At first it was but a four- 
page sheet, but it is now a compact magazine of some 
forty pages, which stands at the head of its field. The 
present editors are John M. Coulter, C. R. Barnes, 
University of Wisconsin, andj. C. Arthur, of Purdue. 



FERRY HALL. 

The Nu Beta Kappa is no more. We mourn its loss, 
but cannot regret that it is at rest. During the last 
months of its life it showed the slowness and decrepi- 
tude of old age, and in June it was attacked by a com- 
mittee of the faculty. The attack threatened to prove 
fatal, but it took a new lease of life and survived the 
pleasant summer months. This fall, however, after a 
desperate struggle for existence, it died, leaving all its 
earthly possessions to its twin daughters, Rhetoricals A 
and Rhetoricals B. 

The organization of the two societies formed to 
take the place of the old Rhetoricals is almost com- 
plete. The meetings, which will be open, by order of 
the faculty, will be held each Wednesday afternoon at 
2:30 in the chapel. The officers of one society are: 
President, Miss Mcintosh; vice-president, Miss Louise 
Conger; secrerary, Miss Harris; critic, Miss Stoddard. 
Of the other society: President, Miss Parmenter; 
vice-president, Miss Daniels; secretary, Miss Wilson; 
critic, Miss Lita Stoddard. 

Miss Ina Young has been compelled to leave school 
on account of illness. We hope that she may return 
after Christmas. 

Miss Lord spent Sunday in Evanston. 

On Wednesday, Sept. 20, Mrs. Joseph Cook, of 
Boston, gave a delightful paper on " Women of the 
Orient," The young ladies are very grateful to Miss 
Norton for providing this pleasure for them. 

Fly-paper has become an established necessity at 
Ferry Hall, and in certain rooms carelessness brings its 
own recompense, for we can testify from experience 
that it "sticketh closer than a brother." " Look before 
you leap." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Mis Wallace paid a visit this week to her sister, 
Miss Dwelle. 

The Misses Chapin spent a few days in Chicago. 

The Seniors had a watermelon feast last week. 
No remarks are necessary. 

Miss Somerville spent Tuesday at Ravenswood. 

Miss Gladys Palmer was the guest of Miss Barnes 
for a week. 

Thursday evening Miss Robinson gave one of her 
pleasant and instructive talks to the girls. An address 
by Miss Conger followed. 

Mr. Mcintosh, of Macomb, visited his sister, Miss 
Alley ne, recently. 

Music is well said to be the " speech of angels," and 
there isn't a " Sem," except a few unfortunates who 
room on the east side or the south end, who will not 
echo that sentiment when you mention the glorious 
serenades we have had this term, and especially the last 
one, for the new songs were so restful we even forgot 
there was a melody entitled, " Good Night, Ladies." 
Therefore, ye pipers, play on! 

The officers of the Senior class for this year are: 
President, Miss Clark; secretary, Miss Condon. 

The officers for the Junior class for this term are: 
President, Miss Nellie Stuart; vice-president, Miss 
Miller; secretary, Miss Mercer; treasurer, Miss Stod- 
dard. 



We are glad to welcome both of these men to our 
Academy, and hope that they may enjoy their work 
here. 

The number of students this Fall is not as large as 
expected, but as soon as times grow better, an increase 
will probably result. There are now eighty-seven en- 
rolled. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

OPENING OF SCHOOL. 

With many of the old students and a goodly num- 
ber of new boys present, school began in the Academy 
on Wednesday, September 13. Although everything 
seemed as familiar as ever, still great changes had taken 
place. 

We are now the proud occupants of three elegant 
new buildings, about which enough has already been 
said. 

Two new professors, Messrs. Meyer and White- 
ford, are among the novelties of the season. They are 
taking the places of Professors Jack and Mendel. 
Prof. Jack is now teaching in the college, and Prof. 
Mendel has returned to his home in Germany. 

Prof. Robert N. Whiteford, M. A., Ph. D., who 
now occupies the chair of English, is a graduate of 
Wabash College, and has taken his degrees from that 
institution. Besides his regular and post-graduate 
courses at Wabash, he took a post-gradaate course in 
English, German and French last year at Johns Hop- 
kins University. 

Prof. G. N. Meyer, M. A., is the new teacher of 
modern languages. He graduated from Colgate Uni- 
versity, in New York, in 1SS9, and has since taught in 
the High School of Des Moines, Iowa. 



To the Academy students for whom this year is 
their first, the older members extend their hands in the 
jolliest, and, it is hoped, the truest friendship. We 
understand you to be gentlemen and only hope wu may 
fulfill your good expectations of us. The opening term 
of each succeeding year brings among us a great num- 
ber of new students, but this line of distinction between 
" old " and " new " students soon vanishes, and both 
enjoy the general credit given to the Academy. 

Society halls are the next thing we need. There 
are unused rooms in Reid Hall, which would be very 
suitable for this purpose, and the societies should at once 
try to procure them. 

Chicago Day at the Fair will be October 9. If 
things go as they should, it will be a holiday. 

Steps have been taken to organize an Athletic asso- 
ciation. Messrs. D. H. Williams, Judson Williams, W. 
L. Jaeger, and R. G. McKinnie have been appointed 
a committee to draw up a constitution. More will be 
said in the next issue regarding this association. 

The Academy foot-ball team has been chosen, and 
has elected Judson Williams, Esq., captain, and R. G. 
McKinnie manager for the coming season. Practice is 
going on every evening. 

All who play tennis can congratulate themselves 
upon the elegant new tennis courts back of Reid Hall. 

At Highland Park, last Wednesday, Messrs. Hedges 
and Thornton crossed rackets with a "double" of that 
place and captured four out of six sets. The set was 
won chiefly by the fine drives of the Lake Forest gen- 
tleman, whose " lawfords " their opponents found im- 
possible to return. 



SOCIETY NEWS. 
All the new students have now been chosen into 
the Gamma Sigma and Tri Kappa societies. Officers 
for the societies were elected on Wednesday, September 
20. Following is the result of the elections: 
Tri Kappa : 

President — B. S. Cutler. 
Vice-President — J. T. Williams. 
Secretary — N. B. Hewitt. 
Treasurer — W. L. Jaeger. 
Sergeant-at-Arms — M. N. Warren. 

Gamma Sig-ma: 

President — R. G. McKinnie. 
Vice-President— C. P. Hall. 
Secretary— W. S. Kline. 
Treasurer — J. H. Rheingans. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ONLY A SCARE. 
Last Saturday the lamp in the room occupied by J. 
H. Rheingans came very near exploding during his 
absence. The result was a panic in the menagerie, and 
the " Campbell," becoming unruly, put his foot through 
the door, so that it was opened in time and the lamp 
thrown out of the window. Prof. Palmer arrived at 
the critical moment, fatigued in his efforts to break the 
pacing record. No serious damage resulted, further 
than the frightening of Greenwood. 



ACADEMY LACONICS. 

Messrs. Bodle, Moriette, McFerran, Carver, Hal- 
bert, Ritchie, Reid, Roberts and Baker are old students 
now' in the college. The last four graduated from the 
Academy in June. 

In the commencement number of the Chicago Uni- 
versity Weekly we notice Prof. Burnap's likeness in a 
cut of the class of '86 of the old Chicago University. 

Mr. F. M. Hatch will not be back with us this year. 
He is now in the emyloy of Marshall Field & Co. 

Mr. George Marshall has entered on active business 

life. 

H. F. Dickinson, '93, has entered the University of 

Wisconsin. 

One who was a student here last year, Fred W. 
Kickbush by name, is now a married resident of Wau- 

saw, Wis. 

Among the notable characters who have not re- 
turned to the fold this year are Graham, Nichols, alias 
« Wild Bill," and Kilgour. 

G. O. Forbes, of last year's senior class, and A. H. 
Bogue, of '93, are now freshmen at Princeton. 

Charlie Durand has left us to be a student at Andover 
Academy. 

Mr. Black, a new student, left us last Monday. 

Several old boys have visited here since school be- 
gan. Among them are Geo. Busse and Nott and Joe 
Flint. The latter are now at Chicago University. 

A petition was handed the Faculty about a week 
ago, asking that Saturday be made a full holiday dur- 
ing the continuance of the World's Fair. The Faculty, 
however, looked at it otherwise, and — you know the 

rest. 

Prof. Palmer took his Ph. D. degree here at com- 
mencement in June. This gives us two Doctors of 
Philosophy in the Faculty. 

Prof. Dudley was visited by his father last week. 

All rooms in the Cottage are now filled. 



ALUMNI. 

\Notc: — The alumni will be pleased to learn that 
Prof. John J. Halsey has consented to take charge of 
this department and will give it his personal attention 
this year. His personal acquaintance with nearly all 
the alumni is sufficient assurance of his interest. You 



are earnestly requested to send him any items of news 
coming under this department. — Ed. ] 

TIDINGS OF '03. 

The class of '93 furnishes six divinity students for 
the coming year. N. H. Burdkk, C. S. Davies, J. A. 
Linn and Henry Marcotte go to McCormick Seminary, 
at 1060 North Halsted St., Chicago; A. W. Doran is 
at the Episcopalian Divinity School at 1 1 13 Washing- 
ton Boulevard, Chicago; E. L. Jones is at Auburn 
Seminary, in New York State. Two from the class 
are reading law — R. H. Crozier, in the office of Cut- 
ting and Castle, S15 Chamber of Commerce Building, 
Chicago; and A. A. Hopkins, at Denver, in the office 
of Rogers & Stair, 53 Symes Block. W. D. McNary 
is in attendance at Rush Medical College. Three are 
in business: L. A. Grove, with the hardware house of 
Grove & Co., at Ellwood City, Penn.; S. B. Hopkins 
with a music and stamp house at 79 State St., Chicago; 
and F. C. Sharon will go into the passenger depart- 
ment of the general offices of the C. B. & Q. R. R., 
either at St. Louis or at St. Joseph, Mo. 

Three of the young ladies are teaching. Miss R. 

E. Adams has not communicated her location. Miss 
B. C. Marshall is assistant principal in the high school 
at Spencer, Iowa, and Miss E. M. Williams is assistant 
principal in the Union school at North Argyle, N. Y. 
The following are at their homes: Miss A. Adams, 
864 South Ashland boulevard, Chicago; W. J. Chaffee, 
Paw Paw, 111.; Miss D. D. Cresswell, Minneapolis, 
Minn.; R.J. Dysart, MacAlester Park, Minn.; W. N. 
McKee, Remington, Ind.; L. N. Rossiter, Lake Forest, 
and Miss B. B. Taylor, Princeville, 111. 

Mr. Sharon and Mr. S. B. Hopkins are following 
business pursuits only for a time. The former still ex- 
pects to take a graduate course in social science at 
Columbia. 

Judge Rogers, the senior of Mr. A. A. Hopkins' 
patrons, is one of the leading lawyers of Colorado.. 

"Double A" writes cordially in his wishes f6r L. 

F. U. "under the new administration," Miss Marshall, 
is with us " in spirit," and seven sturdy fellows — Crozier, 
Davies, Doran, S. B. Hopkins, Marcotte, McKee, Ros- 
siter — have been with us " in the body " to help open 
the new year. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

As Lake Forest develops, and a business element, 
with public interests and public improvement at stake 
appears, the necessity for a reliable news medium to 
record and disseminate transactions and happenings is 
at once obvious. For this reason The Stentor, 
while preeminently a college paper, has determined to 
continue its " Town Topics " department. The Sten- 
tor will endeavor, moreover, to keep pace with the 
progress of the town in its weekly summary of events, 
and will do its utmost to attain to that reliability of in- 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ii 



formation and of the voicing of public opinion, which 
is the foundation of a successful journal. 

Suggestions, news items, or corrections of incorrect 
reports will be cheerfully received by the Town Editor. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. FitzHugh have returned to 
Lake Forest for the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Taber have returned from Far Rock- 
away, Long Island, and will remain in Lake Forest 
through the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jessie L. Moss left last week for a 
week's hunting among the lakes. 

Miss Julia Moss will attend school at Kenilworth 
this winter. 

Mr. C. E. Harvey and family returned to their 
home in Boston last Saturday. 

Miss Mary Dwight left Lake Forest last week for 
Ogontz, where she will attend school this year. 

The first communion service of the school year was 
held Sunday afternoon, Oct. ist. The service was 
well attended. 

The Young People's Society of Christian Work 
of the Church, extendsa hearty invitation to all strangers 
and students to be present at its meeting every Sunday 
evening at 7 o'clock. The Society is essentially the 
same as a Christian Endeavor Society, being conducted 
on the same plan and in the same spirit. Everyone is 
welcome Sunday evenings. 

The old bridge over the seminary ravine has at last 
been sentenced, and will soon be replaced with an iron 
bridge. By a special election last week, the sale of 
$4,000 worth of Lake Forest City bonds was author- 
ized, the proceeds of same to pay for a bridge on May- 
flower Av., over the ravine north of the seminary. 

It seems as if the block pavement, which has been 
completely laid but a month, is doomed to continual 
raggedness. The first rainstorm which tested it under- 
mined sections of pavement in all parts of the town. 
Thus further repairs were necessitated. Nor was it a 
mishap that the blocks should sink down or float away 
in this manner. It was the foregone result which The 
Stentor kept predicting last spring, and predicted 
with good reason, inasmuch as the same trouble 
occurred even then. There is nothing to do now, 
however, but wait and see how long the blocks last. 



EXCHANGES. 

Athletics, especially foot-bal', is the main topic of 
intercollegiate interest during the fall. 

Class games are the means of arousing great interest 
at the University of Wisconsin. 

The Northwestern regards the outlook for foot- 
ball at Evanston as most promising. Their manager is 
a hustler. But Noyes, last year's captain, will not play 
again, which will weaken the team. 



The foot-ball season at Wabash opened on the first 
day with two full elevens in the field. 

The University of Illinois has lost several men, 
among them Huff, but expects to have a fair team. 

The University of Minnesota has the brightest foot- 
ball prospect of all the western colleges. Seven of the 
old team arc back and excellent material for the other 
positions. 

In the East the undergraduate rule will probably be 
revoked. 

Vale is as strong as ever. 

Princeton, with another scion of the Poe family, 
feels confident of success. 

The Pennsylvania men go in with a strong team. 

Cornell is somewhat behind on account of the death 
of their captain. 

Amoug our exchanges we noticed that the Univer- 
sity of California furnishes the largest amount of poetry. 
Both of its papers contain excellent verse. 

CONVERSATION AT MIDNIGHT. 
'Tvvas midnight on the sandy shore, 

Thick fog banks rose around. 
The sounding waves and billows roar 

As if talking with the ground. 

" To-day there wandered four stout wights," 

An oak tree murmured low, 
The strangest of all earthly sights, 

Prof. Harper and his show. 

"A class in Field Geology," 

They call themselves, I hear; 
However they should, it seems to me, 

Have named themselves " The Queer." 

For of their number one drew nigh 

In youthful " freshman " joy, 
Exelaiming as he held up high 

A specimen (poor boy!): 

"Professor, see! what luck to meet 

Upon this lonely scaur, 
Subjected to intensest heat, 

This piece of cinnabar." 

His look was satisfied and bland, 

His specimen was thick; 
And, friends, he held within his hand 

A — well, it was a brick ! 

— Adapted from The Occident. 

bills, 
up 
run 
to 
It is very easy 

But experience brings pain, 
And you find it one of life's greatest ills, 
To try and 



-Ex. 



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3 


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bo 
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7? 



ajunbs sSi 


uiqj 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH Px> 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

Tne most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 



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CIGARS, 
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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



2Tfye Jfunfrctmimtctl Wnt& Jiooh. 



HE one among them all that survives all changes anil all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 



T 

J and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 

he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsorete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the I nited 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law ; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, be has supplemented the work by- 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United Slates," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooler's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year hy year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things'in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned bv this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and uhere much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9 50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THE PUTNAM 




Young Men's Clothing for College and 
Dress Wear a Specialty 

Nobby Black Cheviot Suits, Single and 
Double Breasted, Sack and Cutaway 
Styles at Reasonable Prices, 



Overcoats 



Kerseys. 

Meltons. 

Chinchillas, 

Freize. 

Shetlands. 



BOX, CAPE, 
AND' 
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Prices Positively the Lowest. 
Nobby Hats, Hosiery, Underwear. 
New Styles of Neckwear Received 

every Saturday. 
Open Saturday Evenings. 




Putnam Clothing; House, 



131, 133 Clark Street, 



113, 115 117 Madison Street. 



C. M. BABBITT, Resident Partner. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J R & CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
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Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
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OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to 535 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



/ 



October 10, 1893. 



No. 2 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES THE 
FOLLOWING 



DEPARTMENTS AND SCHOOLS 



UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 



LOCATED AT LAKE FOREST, COMPRISING 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE. 

FERRY COLLEGE FOR YOUNG LADIES. 



FERRY HALL SEMINARY 
LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 



PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENTS. 



THE LAW FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT CHICAGO. 

THE CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 
THE PHILOSOPHICAL FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT LAKE FOREST, OFFERING 

GRADUATE COURSE. 



THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT CHICAGO, COMPRISING 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 
CHICAGO COLLEGEof DENTAL SURGERY. 



For catalogues, or further information regarding any department of the University 
address, 

President JOHN M. COULTER. Lake Forest. 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




9 MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

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CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

o, ,k„ctc c REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE. 

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Chicago- s Leading Religious Weekly. 

Good 

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For Sale at iseivstands. 



Reading 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRegtauraut ano 
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ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
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choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



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DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
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SANITARY.WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 189: 



No. 



HENRY W. GRADY AND HIS NEGRO POLICY. 

SECOND PRIZE ORATION, ILLINOIS INTER-COLLEGIATE ORATORICAL ASSOCIAVION CONTEST, 

GALESBURG, OCTOBER 6TH. 



Among the boys who watched the march 
of Sherman " from Atlanta to the sea," 
was one who was himself destined to be- 
come a leader of the South. Very early 
in life this youth aspired to journalism and a 
few years later he became eminently successful 
as an editor. Then, suddenly, like some newly 
risen star, he Hashed forth and became won- 
derfully successful as an orator. This boy 
was Henry W. Grady. 

As a journalist this young man studied the 
South, her people and her needs, and through his 
paper, the Atlanta Constitution, scattered over 
the land new ideas of social life, of enterprise, 
agriculture and national patriotism. He 
created a new spirit. His new ideas aroused 
the people, and the whole South learned to 
love him. But alas! when their love had but 
fairly begun to ripen and the flower of his 
genius to flourish, that flower faded from be- 
fore their eyes. 

Mr. Grady was to the new South what Jef- 
erson Davis was to the old, but he was more 
useful to both. He loved not only the South 
but theunion. He had aconceptionof national 
unity, which others had not — aconceptionof the 
honor, glory and power of our nation as a 
whole, which made him universally respected 
North and South. At the Boston banquet he 
said " I am glad that the omniscient God held 
the balance of battle in His Almighty Hand, 
and that human slavery was swept forever from 
the American soil, the American union saved 
from the wreck of war." Although he made no 
apology for the South, and said she had noth- 
ing to take back; still he was the first to cease 
mourning over the past and like a hero accept- 
ed the arbitrament of the sword, to which the 
South appealed, as final, and amid the ruins 
and wrecks of war sought to build up a grand 
and glorious country, "conceived, as he said, in 
American wisdom, won by American valor, 
sustained in American hearts, and cemented 
with the best American blood." 

This beloved son of the South presented 
to his countrymen a new policy. Two things 
he said are necesssary to reconcile the North 
and South — the development of her material 
resources, and the settlement of the negro 
problem. The first feature of his policy, the 
development of her material resources, we 
heartily endorse. The fruit of his labor has 



already appeared, and for it all men will praise 
him. But to his solution of the race problem 
we are forced to take exception. 

"To carry in peace, honor and prosperity on 
the same soil, two utterly dissimilar races with 
equal civil and political rights, almost equal in 
number, but terribly unequal in intelligence 
and responsibility," he says "is a problem with- 
out precedent or parallel in history." lb- 
says that her wisest and best men have laid 
down two essential principles as unchangeable. 

First, The whites shall have clear and un- 
mistakeable control of public affairs. They 
own the property and have the intelligence, 
and theirs is the responsibility- The white race, 
he says, is the superior race, and cannot and 
will not submit to the domination of an inferior 
one, It is because they fear the ignorant negro 
vote that the whites everywhere have agreed 
to bury differences in moral and economic 
issues, and to cast a solid ballot. 

Second, The white and black races must 
walk in "separate paths, but equal." This 
means separate schools, separate churches, 
and separate accommodations everywhere. 
This does not outlaw the negro, for he claims 
that under this political and social policy the 
negro has made rapid progress. To-day he 
has in every state his own farms and city pro- 
perty, his own societies, churches and schools, 
and the negro takes hold of education with 
amazing eagerness. 

All honor and praise to Mr. Grady for his 
patriotic devotion to his people. We can but 
love the man wholonged to reconcile the North, 
and who labored to rebuild the South. By 
his noble and unselfish life, he won the heart 
of the South, and by his candor and eloquence 
the patient ear of the North. No man in our 
midst ever pleaded so eloquently for her. And 
while we would not dim one star that shines in 
the crown of his glory in that sunny land, and 
would accord to him all sincerity of purpose 
and honesty of conviction; yet, in justice to 
hmanity, it is our duty to defend a noble prin- 
ciple and plead for a fallen race. 

Why is it that our rich and fair Southern 
domain lags behind the North? Why 
should she progress with feebler step and 
emigration shun her shores? — It is her treat- 
ment of the negro! It is her deep-rooted 
prejudice against the black man; a prejudice 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



that cannot be denied and is not denied even 
by Mr. Grady.* It is nothing else than pre- 
judice that demands white supremacy. It is 
the finger of prejudice that points out separate 
paths for the negro. 

There is one general principle that refutes 
his whole policy: "The fatherhood of God and 
the brotherhood of man." It is because we 
stand upon this principle, founded upon eternal 
truth, a principle that is broader, deeper, higher, 
and nobler than prejudice, and against which 
prejudice cannot prevail — that we take issue 
with Mr. Grady. 

First — Because his policy is discrimination 
and discrimination fetters the negro, fetters a 
freeman, and defies national law. Second — 
Because its tendencies are dangerous. 

At the recent African Congress in Chicago, 
the latest facts and theories concerning the 
negro's condition were considered; his progress 
defined and his future predicted. In discussing 
this "Southern problem," L. H. Blair, an ex- 
confederate soldier of Richmond, Virginia, 
showed from statistics of eighteen years that 
the suppression of the negro vote in the South 
is detrimental to her own interests. He says 
coercion injures her cities, drives away emi- 
gration, retards progress and has expatriated 
forty per cent, of her sons to the North and 
West, where justice rules and freedom reigns. 
Coercion neutralizes the energy and intelli- 
gence of the South, consumes her time, kills 
her ambition and destroys her hope. 

The separate school system of the South 
is a menace to her own welfare. In the report 
of Commissioner Harris on education, we are 
told that there are thousands of cases in the 
South, in poorer counties, where both whites 
and blacks suffer from this separate school 
system. Says the Superintendent of Morgan 
County, Tennessee, "There are forty-seven 
colored people scattered promiscuously along 
the railroads, hence no colored schools." 
Says the Superintendent of Houston County, 
Georgia, "The colored children out number 
the whites almost four to one, and the whites 
are so sparsely settled that it is impossible to 
have schools." In Alabama, if the blacks out 
number the whites, the spirit of the law gives 
better accommodations to the whites. Twenty- 
two per cent of the whites in the South attend 
school and but eighteen and one-half per cent 
of the blacks. This is due not to lack of in- 
terest but almost entirely to lack of accom- 
modation. Such school laws are unjust to the 
negro. The danger of this policy is that the 
negro does not and will not get his equal rights 
and privileges by law. Under it, prejudice can 
have full sway, hiding behind a policy that 
savors of equality and fairness, but gives full 
reins to injustice. 

Furthermore, the separation of the races 

* In his reply to Geo. W. Cable. 



brands the negro with inequality and inferiority. 
Said Doctor Ward, recently, in considering 
his system of negro education, " It teaches 
the democratic child that knows no race or 
color, not to associate with the negro, but to 
look down upon him as inferior." Thus the 
rising generations of the South imbibe a pre- 
judice against the negro, and will transmit it 
from father to son, time without end. Mean- 
while the social condition of the negro will 
grow no better. 

A still greater danger of this system is its 
tendency to widen the breach between the 
races, and to make men forget the laws of 
brotherly love altogether. Says the State 
Superintendent of South Carolina, "There is 
much opposition to negro education in this 
state and in the South generally, because of 
the small amount of taxes paid by the negro. 
The opposition is intensified by the belief, 
that is more or less prevalent, that education 
spoils the colored people as laborers to the 
damage of the whites. It is said, you educate 
a negro and you spoil a field hand." Says the 
Superintendent of Oceanic County, Mississippi, 
" By no means tax the whites to educate the 
blacks." Here is the danger. First — It is 
separate education. Later — Separate taxation 
for education — a direct blow at our principle 
of public taxation for public good, and a deadly 
thrust at our Goddess of Liberty, the Public 
School System! 

Such a policy is dictated by prejudice and 
fostered by selfishness, and in time will crown 
its adherents with infamy. 

Although Mr. Grady, himself, demanded 
"equal paths" for the negro, nevertheless, 
such a policy has already become a greater 
power for evil than good. To-day it is a friend 
of illiteracy and an advocate of injustice. 
Under it, the principles of universal ethics are 
lost in selfishness. It is out of harmony with 
our broad American spirit. For our nation 
cannot permit anypolicy toimpede the progress 
of ourchildren. 

The American negro is an offspring of 
liberty and a child of progress. He came here 
a slave, later was emancipated, soon enfran- 
chised and finally given all the rights of a 
citizen. Thirty years ago a slave^to-day 
he makes laws. He enters the higher pro- 
fessions. He has proved to the world that he 
can be civilized! 

Intelligence and morality are the corner- 
stones of our civilization, and any policy that 
winks at ignorance, or that fetters the progress 
of any man, white or black, or that leads men 
astray from the path of moral duty is a crime 
against society, and dangerous not only to the 
South but also to our nation. 

Arthur P. Bourns. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



STATE ORATORICAL. 

LAKE FOREST WINS SECOND. 

PRESIDENCY OE THE ASSOCIATION IS OURS. 

The annual convention of the Illinois Inter-Collcg- 
ate Oratorical and Athletic Association was held at 
Galesburg on October 5th and 6th. The gathering 
was large and enthusiastic, about 250 students being in 
attendance. The president of Illinois College adjourned 
school and students and faculty came in a body. At 
first Lake Forest's two solitary representatives were 
almost " lost in the scuffle," but they were unmistak- 
ably heard from a little later. 

In the athletic contests Knox College was easily first, 
winning over four-fifths of the events. The records 
made were, as a rule, barely up to the average. Thurs- 
day night a reception was given, followed by "toasts." 
President Finley of Knox presided, and introduced the 
speakers as follows: 

" Freshwater Colleges," II. H. Bancroft, Illinois 
College; "The Greeks;" E. E. Meacham, Illinois 
Wesleyan; "Our State," J. T. Wasson, Knox; "The 
Student Athlete," VV. A. Bishop, Lake Forest; "Col- 
lege Eloquence," C. H. Warner, Blackburn; "The 
College and the Home," R. H. McCracken, Mon- 
mouth; Recitation, F. J. Standard, Knox. After the 
"toasts" the assembly was served with ice cream and 
cake, and then the floor was cleared for dancing. The 
occurence thus combined in one the three features of a 
reception, state banquet and a ball. 

The business meeting of the Oratorical Association 
was held on Friday morning. The delegates elected 
the following officers: — President, VV. A. Bishop, 
Lake Forest; Vice-President, J. R. Orr, Wesleyan; 
Secretary-Treasurer, D. W. Frackleton, Illinois Col- 
lege; Delegates to Inter-State Contest, Schenck of 
Monmouth, Moreland of Knox, Challcombe of Black- 
burn. 

It was decided to hold the next contest at Jackson- 
ville, under the auspices of Illinois College. Eureka 
College made a strong plea for admission to the As- 
sociation. The convention, in committee of the whole, 
decided to recommend the admission of Eureka, sub- 
ject to the approval of two-thirds of the local associa- 
tions, who are to report within the next six weeks. 

The most important event to us, i. c, the oratorical 
contest, took place on Friday evening. The hall was 
well filled, and the program an interesting one: 

PROGRAM. 

Garden Glacier Waltzes Keller Bella 

Conservatory Orchestra. 

Prayer. 

Vocal Solo — "The Last Hours of Joan of Arc," . ..Lugi Bordese 

Miss Florence J. Lee. 
1. " Henry W. Grade and his Negro Policy," 

A. P. Bourns, Lake Forest University. 
2 "The Policy of Richelieu," 

Chas. F. Wishart, Monmouth College. 



3. "America Arena,". . W. \V. Whitmore, Wesleyan University 
Violin Solo — Variations on a Gavotte,. Corclle Leonard 

Prof. Wm. Cheeseman. 

4. "A Plea for the Organized Charities,'' 

Grove T. Elkins, Knox College. 

5. "The Master Spirit of the French Revolution." 

John A. Barber, Illinois College. 

6. "Cheap Citizenship,"....!. A. Benson, Blackburn University 

College Overture Moses 

Orchestra. 
Decision of Judges. 

Lack of space forbids comment on the speakers in de- 
tail. The general criticism may be made that the orations 
were strong in thought and weak in delivery. Mr. 
Bourns was said by competent critics to have had by 
far the clearest and forcible delivery, the latter quality 
being especially lacking in many of the orators. He 
secures a prize of fifty dollars for his efforts, while Mr. 
Wishart has seventy-five, with a chance at the Inter- 
State contest at Indianapolis next spring. 



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We take the following from a comparison of the 
English and German Universities given in a lelter to 
to The ('nit: "The idea of the English University is 
culture rather than scholarship and most of the students 
who go abroad, go for scholarship. Perhaps many of 
these would do well to seek first culture. In case they 
did, Oxford would be overwhelmed. The Oxford man 
is a gentleman and a scholar too, it mav be, but within 
certain restricted lines. A German University differs 
from Oxford strikingly in the range of the instruction 
offered. German Universities offer unlimited oppor- 
tunties for specialzation, hence their popularity. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE 


LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 


PUBLISHING COMPANY. 


Harry L. Bird, '94, 


Editor 


W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 
A. O. Jackson, '96, > 


Locals 


David Fales, '96, 


Town 


Prof. J. J. Halsey, 


- Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 


Exchanges 


Miss Lucia Clark, ) 


- Ferry Hall 


Miss Louise Conger, ) 


S. E. Gruenstein, j 
B. S. Cutler, j 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 


Business Manager 


C B. Moore, '95, 


Advertising 




TERMS. 


Per Year, in advance, $1.50 


Single Copies, 


.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

LAST week the mission of the college paper 
was concisely defined by Prof. Halsey. 
We wish to further emphasize one of the most 
important missions of the college paper, viz.: 
to encourage literary effort amongthe students 
— an object which is too often neglected. In 
general our students have been quite back- 
ward in contributing to their publications. But 
no more efficient literary drill can be found 
than in " writing for print." The practice 
tends to correct minor faults of composition 
and teaches condensation — a most valuable 
accomplishment. For the intending preacher, 
teacher, lawyer, and, in fact, for those looking 
to almost any vocation, a good style, with ease 
of expression, is worth very much. Here is an 
excellent opportunity for acquiring this skill. 
A good oration or a fine essay ought always to 
find their way into the college paper. There 
are also many in school who can produce a 
readable story, if they "set their minds to it." 
In the field of poetry as well, there are a. num- 
ber of budding geniuses who should thus re- 
veal themselves. For if an amateur poet hides 
his light under a bushel for too long a time it 
is apt to entirely die out. 
At the outset of the year The University 



Stentor desires to appeal to all students of 
L. F. U. for contributions on any subject of 
general interest. We also ask that any special 
news items be reported to some member of 
the staff. Our reporters are not omnipresent, 
so they are likely to miss things occasionally. 

* * 
# 

THIS is the season when the new students 
are making choice of their " societies," and 
it is therefore the time when each society puts 
forth its best efforts to secure new material. 
It is to be hoped that this year those efforts 
will be more legitimate than they have often 
been in the past. We allude especially to the 
romantic fabrications which members of one 
society have been wont to relate in regard to 
their rivals. Men otherwise respectable have 
drawn on their imagination to paint a picture 
of their friends " at the other end of the hall" 
in such grewsome colors that the awestruck 
Freshmen have wondered why such creatures 
are tolerated in school. And in turn he is 
almost led to expect to see wings sprout on 
the shoulders of the members of "our" par- 
ticular crowd. All this is wrong, of course. 
The straight truth and nothing but the truth is 
what an uninformed student wants and is what 
he is entitled to receive. The men who tell 
" fish stories" should be ostracised. 

* * 
* 

ONCE more Lake Forest is well to the front 
in oratory. It was too much to expect 
that we would secure second place twice in 
succession, but our representative made a 
plucky fight, and considering the difficulties he 
had to overcome, made an excellent record. 
Of course we do not wish any harm to the 
winner, but if anything should happen to Mr, 
Wishart, he can rest assured that Illinois will 
stand where she did last year at the Inter- 
State. 

* * 
* 

THE new courses of study and the improved 
system of instruction introduced by Dr. 
Coulter have met with unqualified approval on 
the part of the students. As was naturally ex- 
pected, there is some trouble in fitting the new 
on to the old, but that difficulty will entirely 
disappear within a year's time. The curri- 
culum of our college will now compare favor- 
ably with the best educational institutions of 
the country. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



/ 




SKETCH OF MR. BOURNS. 

Arthur P. Bourns was born in Edison Park. Chi- 
cago, twenty-three years ago. His father, one of Chi- 
cago's early settlers, is a retired Congregational clergy- 
man. At an early age Mr. Bourns became interested 
in literary work. He entered Jefferson High School 
in 1SS7, and, having completed four years work of the 
classical course in three, was graduated with the class 
of '90. 

He immediately matriculated with the class of '94 in 
Lake Forest College, and 'has from the first been one 
of its most influential and marked men. He has always 
been a prominent man in athletics, winning numerous 
prizes every field day, and especially has he excelled in 
musical lines and oratory. 

At high school many considered him first in declam- 
ation and debate. In both his Freshman and Sopho- 
more years he participated in the final contests in de- 
clamation, and was one of the si* in the Junior oratori- 
cal. At the local contest open to all, he was chosen to 
represent L. F. U. at the State Oratorical Contest, held 



this year at Galesburg, under the aus- 
pices of Knox College. 

Like our A. A. Hopkins, who won first 
prize at Champaign last year, Mr. Bourns 
expects to enter the profession of' law. 

He has been a willing and capable 
worker in the many lines he has taken up. 
He is at present managerof the football team, 
vice-president of the Athletic Association, 
business managerof the University Sten- 
TOR, and winner of the third oratorical 
honor Lake Forest has ever taken from 
other colleges. 



COLLEGE LOCALS, 

Forest Grant favored us with a visit last 
week. He will attend Chicago University 
this year. 

Owing to the musicale given bv the 
Zcta Epsilon Society, the Athenians held 
their regular meeting on Thursday evening 
of last week. A good program was rend- 
ered, followed by a business meeting at 
which several names were proposed for 
membership. 

As was expected, Chicago Day was 
granted as a holiday. Throughout the day 
the departments out here presented a decid- 
edly deserted appearance. 

It is with regret we learn that it will not 
be possible to secure a lecture by Prof. 
Drummond. We should, however, con- 
gratulate ourselves on the fact we are so 
near Chicago as to be able to take advantage 
to a large extent of the opportunity of 

listening to perhaps the profoundest thinker of our 

age. 

Most of us read the account of the foot ball game 
between Champaign and W abash. Champaign will 
this year be our most bitter rival, and we can study the 
result of her game with Wabash with very great benefit 
to ourselves. 

It would be a splendid thing if some of the appar- 
atus for laboratory work displayed at the World's Fair, 
for instance, the fine display in the Electricity Building, 
could be purchased for our institution. Many of these 
instruments arc of foreign manufacture, and at another 
time would be hard to obtain, and, moreover, the asso- 
ciations would add something to these purchases. Al- 
ready many Western colleges have taken advanrage of 
the opportunity offered them and have bought large 
numbers of these instruments. 

Dr. W. C. Roberts, ex-president of our University, 
spent last Sunday with Henry Ives Cobbs. He ex- 
pressed himself as being greatly pleased at the unison 
of the two college papers. 

Note. — This week The University Stextor 
appears one day late on account of " Chicago Day." 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



In elocution work this year no class lines will be 
drawn between Freshmen and Sophomores and Juniors 
and Seniors. It is to be hoped, however, that this will 
cause no diminution of interest in the annual contests. 
Prof. Booth is giving additional drill to the upper 
classes in voice culture. 

" Sport" Burdick, looking well and heart}', drifted 
in on Wednesday. We were glad to see him but also 
somewhat surprised, as it was still rather early in the 
season for him. 

T. M. Hopkins, of the Espuimaux Village, spent Fri- 
day with us. "Tom" still carries his genial smile about 
with him. 

We would once more beg leave to call attention to 
the fact that in the present state of the weather there 
should be steam in the gymnasium every day. It is al- 
most pitiful to watch the foot ball men as they stand 
shivering while changing their clothes. The janitor 
even threatens to close the building, as it is impossible 
for him to keep comfortable down in the basement with- 
out a heavy overcoat. The students in general also 
have cause for complaint on account of the lack of 
steam, as stated last week. 

'94 numbers twenty-six; three young ladies, two 
foot-ball elevens and one president. 

'95 is composed of a foot-ball captain and some boys 
and girls looking for Junior dignity. Their officers for 
this term are: President, F. S. Mellen; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Miss Abigail J. Davies; Secretary, Miss Tanetta 
Gilliland; Treasurer, J. H. Rice; Sergeant-at-arms 
Miss Nona Phelps. 

'97 comes up after being "under the pump" and 
playing "funnel" with twenty-six fresh, eager faces, and 
becomes a part of us with the following class officers: 
President, Frank Moriette; Vice-President, Miss 
Wetherhold; Secretary, M. K. Baker; Treasurer, Miss 
Hodge; Corresponding Secretary, W. U. Halbert, 
Sergeant-at-arms, J. Adams. 



Z. E. MUSICALE 

Last Friday evening the Zeta Epsilon Societv acted 
the part of hosts at a " Musicale " in their hall. Al- 
though the sky threatened, it kept no one awa}', for the 
size of the company was limited only to the number of 
invitations issued. The appreciative audience listened 
to a program made up of glee and banjo selections, and 
piano solos by Miss Clark and S. Gruenstein. Mr. 
Wright recited " The Vagabonds" with very pleasing 
effect. The Society wishes to express its thanks to 
those who assisted with the program, and also to the 
young ladies who so kindly aided in the decorations, 
which were made a special feature. After the exer- 
cises delightful refreshments were served, and Mr. 
Wright further added to the occasion by telling about 
the old " Terboggan." The guests were unanimous in 
expressing themselves as charmed with pleasant and 
original entertainment. 



FERRY HALL. 

Two new classes have been formed, one in sight- 
reading of music, conducted by Mrs. Hester, and the 
other a class in elocution taught by Miss Fleming. 

One of the literary societies held its meeting on 
Wednesday afternoon. It was no improvement on the 



old rhetoricals and was most decidedly not a success. 
The program was very short, owing to the late excuses 
of those who were to take part, and even those who 
were on showed lack of necessarv preparation and 
thought. For the last few years the programs, even 
when at their best, had an ample supply of mediocrity, 
and every one, no matter how badly prepared, was sure 
of a round of applause. This may be due to the fact 
that we are too easily pleased, but it seems to be more 
a matter 1 of custom; at any rate, whatever the cause 
may be, it is plain to be seen that enthusiasm and inter- 
est in the meetings are lacking, and an ambition to do 
more than " get through " is almost unheard of. Our 
new societies can not reach any degree of success if this 
state continues; the officers alone can do nothing to 
better such a condition, it calls for the efforts and indi- 
vidual attention of all. 

Among the guests at Ferry Hall last week \\ ere 
Miss Grace McCord, '93, Miss Mildred Lyon, '93, 
Miss Theo Kane, and Mrs. Storis, New York. 

Mrs. Bush, of Fort Sheridan, visited Miss Marian 
Davis on Wednesday. 

Mrs. Conger and Miss Conger, of Prairie du Lac, 
Wis., were at Ferry Hall on Tuesday. 

Miss Hallie Hall, '92, has a good story in the chil- 
dren's department of 7 he Interior of Sept. 30th. 

On Tuesday evening, Sept. 26th, at the home of 
Mr. R. S. Greenlee, 3S5 Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, 
occurred the marriage of their onl v daughter, Gertrude, of 
the classof '90, Ferry Hall, to Mr. James Allen Lonsbury, 
of Hartford, Conn. The house was beautifully dec- 
orated in yellow and white. The ceremony was per- 
formed in the large ball room on the upper floor. The 
bridesmaids were Misses Grace Greenlee, Chicago; 
Gertrude Ellis, Oconto, Wis. ; Kit Clark, Independence, 
la. ;Libhie Curtis, Chicago. Mr. Ralph Lonsbury, 
the groom's brother, acted as best man. The bride's 
dress was of heavy cream-white satin, with a demi- 
train, and a rope of satin about the hem. It was made 
with a bertha of applique lace, and large puffed sleeves. 
The veil, of point applique, was fastened with diamonds. 
She carried jessamine and lilies of the valley. The 
bridesmaids wore point d' esprit over white satin. 
Upon their return from Denver, Mr. and Mrs. Lons- 
bury will spend the winter as guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Greenlee. 



SEMINARY CLASS OF '93. 

Miss Black is attending school at Normal, 111., pre- 
paratory to teaching. Miss McWilliams has gone to 
the University of Chicago. Miss Edith J. Smith and 
Miss Johnson are teaching. Miss Grace Taylor is in- 
terested in Kindergarten work in Chicago. Miss Lyon 
and Miss McCord are at home. Miss Jeanette Ken- 
nedy will enter the University of Chicago after Christ- 
mas. 

We were very glad to have some of the " old girls" 
with us again. After a few weeks of homesickness it 
is more than pleasant to listen to the conversation of 
some one who " fairly loves even the dirt in Lake 
Forest." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

At the present time the students are finding diffi- 
culty in keeping schedule hours, owing to the lack of 
some noise-breeding thing to announce the hours. A 
small hand-hell is now used, and while it is possible, if 
on the alert, to catch its peals, it is intended for Reid 
Hall only. We need something in the line of a fog- 
horn or bell — the latter is preferred — which shall per- 
form its duty, from the turrets of Reid Hall. "New 
facilities make new demands," and the satisfaction of 
"new demands 1 ' makes completeness. 



Chicago, in the last few months, has been the centre 
of the world, and consequently the vortex of interest. 
More brilliant lights have been there than ever before 
in one place, in the same time. The world's famous 
poets, writers and statesmen, the nobility of monarchial 
realms, have been courted by her in throngs. Her 
theatres hold the brilliant stars of the drama. To her 
populace is exhibited the pride and pith of each nation's 
civilization, the advancement of centuries. He is indeed 
fortunate to whom it is possible to take advantage of 
these, the chances of a lifetime, and some which cen- 
turies do not offer. Therefore, a clear conscience on 
the part of the Faculty may accompany an almost in- 
discriminate distribution of holidays during the remain- 
der of this month. 



It might be appropriate to remark in these columns 
that the promoters of our Y. M. C. A. do not intend 
allowing the earnest purpose of the meeting to be 
thwarted by the infant-boisterousness of any of the at- 
tendants. 



In the last move of the faculty concerning absences 
one can discern good intentions toward the students. 
Whether any benefits are derived from the new rules 
is doubtful. This custom prevailed last year, so that 
virtually the only new clause of the measure seems to 
be that 17 demerits on account of unexcused absences 
— and not an absence counting as one, but in some cases 
five points — will result for the seniors in having " con- 
ned ions severed" for an indefinite time. 



land, full-back. Substitutes, Fortier, Woolsey, Gates, 
aim Randolph. The management is trying to arrange 
for eight games, and will be open for dates with all 
teams averaging not more than 150 Ihs. weight. 



OUR Y. M. C. A. • 

Last year the Academy Y. M. C. A. was estab- 
lished under the most auspicious circumstances. Its 
officers were men of energy and sought to at once 
remedy by common effort the disadvantages under 
which the Christian workers had been laboring previ- 
ous to this organization. Irregular attendance at Tues- 
day night prayer-meeting, no organization, and conse- 
quent lack of common aim had resulted in no progres- 
sive work. All this was altered as the meet'ngs began 
to gather interest. The corps of officers take up their 
work this year with prospects of great success. Let 
not the efforts of last year be disregarded, but let every 
one help along the work. 



FOOTBALL. 

The first match game of the season on the home 
grounds occurred last Saturday afternoon. The Aca- 
demy team met the Hyde Park High School, and after 
a hard fought battle in which there was much good 
playing on both sides, the home team won by the score 
of 16 to 12. In the first half both sides secured touch- 
downs, from which goals were kicked, leaving the 
score tied at the end of the half. In the half Hyde 
Park scored by a long run around the end. Gillekmd 
was hurt, and Jackson took his place. He made a 
strong run, getting a touchdown. YVoclfel for the sec- 
ond time kicked goal. Only a few minutes remained, 
but by hard rushing the Academy pushed the ball over 
the line. Time was called with the ball near the mid- 
dle of the field. 

Explanatory. — The above account was not writ- 
ten by the Academy correspondents, so they arc not 
responsible for any deficiencies. — Ed. 



ATHLETIC. 

The foot-ball team has now been selected from 
among the many promising candidates. Following are 
the players and their respective positions: 

North, left end; Taylor, left tackle; Reinhart, left 
guard; McKinnie, centre; Rheingans, right guard; 
Kennedy, right tackle; Campbell, right end; Woelfel, 
quarter back; Captain Williams, right half-b«ck; Gille- 



CLASS NEWS. 

Officers for the senior class have been elected as fol- 
lows: 

President, P. S. Cutler; Vice-President, R. G. Mc- 
Kinnie; Secretary, T. A. Thornton; Treasurer, W. 
Hedges. 

The third form organized and elected officers a few 
days ago. Their officers are: I. I. Jackson, Presi- 
dent; Wright, Vice-President ; Franklin, Secretary. 
This i6 the first instance in which the third form orga- 
nized so early in the year. The members deserve 
credit for their promptness. 



ACADEMY LACONICS. 

The mails have been quite irregular of late. 

" General " Kilgour put in his appearance the other 
.Saturday and has settled down to work again. 

Mrs. Lambcrton, of Lake City, Minnesota, visited 
her son Edward last week. 

Prof. Whiteford enjoyed a visit from his father las 
week. 

Geo. Busse has entered the UTnion College of Law, 
Chicago. 

Cutler was visited by his grandmother Tuesday. 



BOOKS EXPECTED. 

The " Shrill-Voiced Oyster of the Western Plains," 
bv Mr. Wayne Condon, author of "The Fly in the 
Butter." 

Dunham has given life to a plaintive lyric entitled 
"I Want Mr Ma." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



OF 

faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAIEEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion. 

For further information, address the Secretary, 



ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING 

79 DEARBORN STREET. 



ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

CHICAGO. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH I» 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

Tne most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Sox. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 



FRED. WE1S, 



THE WELL KNOWN 



/T\<?retjai)t Tailor. 



HAS ALWAYS A VERY FINE LINE OF 
TIECE GOODS TO UE MADE UP IN SUITS, 
AT VERY LOW PRICES 

CLEANING AND REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 



Septa m\> Specialty. 

E. R. MARTIN, 
Hrtist . jp)botograpber. 

PETTE PANELS. $1.00 PER DOZ. 

78 STATE STREET, 



KRANZ BUILDING. 



O PPOSITE 

N. END OF DEPOT. 



Lake Forest, III. 



TAKE ELEVATCR. 



Chicago. 



TOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

AND 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 




ROBERT MERCER, 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
PIPES, AND 
STATIONERY. 

AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



f&\}£ ^nnbctmtntctl Wn\x* IBook. 



HE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 



T 

; and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 

he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooky's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that "field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its templing 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS. $9 50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 



Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



CANDY 
CANDY 
CANDY 



Send $1.25, $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box bj' express, 
of the best candies in America, 
put up in Elegant Boxes and 
Strictly Pure. Suitable for 
presents. Express charges pre- 
paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all Chicago. Try it once. 

ADDRESS, 



THE CELEBRATED POSER. 

D. R. COOVER. 

fl>botoovapber, 



C. F. GUINTHER 70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 



CONFECTIONER, 



212 STATE STREET, 
CHICAGO. 



BRUBAKER 

Waukegan, HI. 

NEW LOCATION. NEW ROOMS. 

NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
216 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 



FORMERLY OF HARRISON A COOVER. 



SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 




TTbe Craio press, 

printers, publishers, Designers 

178=1S2 /IDouroe Street 

Cbicago. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THE PUTNAM 




Young Men's Clothing for College and 
Dress Wear a Specialty 

Nobby Black Cheviot Suits, Single and 
Double Breasted, Sack and Cutaway 
Styles at Reasonable Prices 



Overcoats 



Kerseys. 

Meltons. 

Chinchillas. 

Freize. 

Shetlands. 



! 

BOX, CAPE, 
AND 
ULSTER 
SHAPE. 



Prices Positively the Lowest. 
Nobby Hats, Hosiery, Underwear. 
New Styles of Neckwear Received 

every Saturday. 
Open Saturday Evenings. 




Putnam Clothing House, 



131, 133 Clark Street, 



113, 115 117 Madison Street. 



C. M. BABBITT, Resident Partner. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE miller, m. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President, 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A.M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. 0. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE JR b CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS, 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers 'Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

IN. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



October 17, 1893. 



No. 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES THE 
FOLLOWING 



DEPARTMENTS AND SCHOOLS 



UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 



LOCATED AT LAKE FOREST, COMPRISING 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE. 

FERRY COLLEGE FOR YOUNG LADIES. 



FERRY HALL SEMINARY 
LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 



PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENTS. 



THE LAW FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT CHICAGO. 

THE CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 
THE PHILOSOPHICAL FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT LAKE FOREST, OFFERING 

GRADUATE COURSE. 



THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL FACULTY. 

LOCATED AT CHICAGO, COMPRISING 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 
CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY. 



For catalogues, or further information regarding any department of the LIniversity, 
address, 

President JOHN M. COULTER, Lake Forest, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

* * HARNESS, 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

BLANKETS, ETC. ™ K ™» PTLY ME 

Waukegan, III. 



Chicago's Leading Religions II eekly. 

M Good 

The v 

tnteriorI Sunday 




, JsfesGsML 

For Sale at Aeivstands. 



| Reading 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

"Kestaurant ano 

Cboice Confectionery, 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER — k. 



choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



A.H. ABBOTT &C0. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING. 

J. G. Cornish, 



DEALER INT 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, « 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND MANl'FACTl'KER OI" 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. III. 

N ORMAN J. ROBERTS, 

DENTAL 
SURGEON 

WAUKEGAN, ILL. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 



Practical 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS, 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, ETC . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



PLUMBER * GAS FITTER, 



SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1893 



No. 3 



THE PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS. 



The Parliament of Religions has come and gone. 
As Dr. Burrows said in his address of welcome, "It is 
a new great fact in the historic evolution of the human 
race, which will not be obliterated." 

There were three great purposos underlying the 
Congress. First, the union of all religions against irre- 
ligion; second, the comparison of the various religious 
beliefs as set forth by their own votaries; and third, the 
clearing away all false impressions of each other's faith. 

The basis for the union of the faiths, as agreed upon, 
was the Golden Rule. This rule was observed 
throughout the Congress, not only In' the Christian 
representatives but bv all who took part in the Con- 
gress except in one or two instances. The rebuke that 
followed the breach of courtesy was sufficient to make 
the other speakers very careful of their language. In- 
justice, intolerance and criticism were barred from the 
platform, and on the whole a feeling of good fellowship 
and even genuine love was shown. 

There was, however, no compromise, no back-down 
by anyone. Each speaker spoke out positively, frankly 
and courageously his own conviction regarding his 
faith. He was requested to speak boldly and without 
compromise, and was assured that no criticism would be 
tolerated. This is the only way a fair comparison could 
have been made. The best representatives obtainable 
were selected to present their own faith in order that 
the religious beliefs of the world might be compared in 
their best possible light. 

Such comparison cannot but clear away misjudge- 
ments and misunderstandings of each others faith. It 
was not attempted to treat all religions as of equal merit, 
but each system of belief was impartially set forth and 
each system stood by itself, uncompromised in any de- 
gree by its relation to other systems. 

Great results are looked for and will surely follow 
this gathering of the world's representative religious 
men. The barriers of hatred and suspicion are already 
broken. The men who were here will go home and 
tell of the courtesy and cordiality with which they were 
received and entertained. They, too, have learned the 
lesson of tolerance and unbiased inquiry before forming 
a judgment, and they return home to become the preach- 
ers and advocates, not of a new faith, but of a more 
liberal spirit ; a spirit of tolerance toward foreign be- 
liefs. Thus the ignorance that breeds prejudice will 
give way to a more earnest study and careful compari- 
son of religious beliefs, and the good in each will surely 
temper the harsh misjudgements and fanatical hatred of 
the past. 



Nor will the Christian religion suffer from this com- 
parison. Why should we fear to know what God has 
wrought throught the prophets of India or the sage of 
China, through Buddha or Zoroaster or the prophet of 
Islam? Has Christianity been weakened because she 
was tolerant and charitable, and planned and provided 
this memorable assembly? Nay, it was one of Chris- 
tianity's greatest triumphs. This Congaess could not 
have been held in any other than a Christian countrj . 
It could not have been called and carried out under any 
other system of faith. Christianity alone was tolerant 
and had the good of all mankind in view when this 
Congress was called. She alone of all the religions 
coidd lead the way to the universal brotherhood of man- 
kind as children of one God. It was her Lord's prayer 
that was repeated as the universal prayer. There is no 
other prayer like it. 

Now that Christianity has led in this advance move- 
ment others may follow. There is no limit to this 
movement and it may become world-wide. It embraces 
all men of all creeds from all the ends of the earth. 

A. Haberli. 



HAPPINESS- 
I 'm happy as a dewdrop 

Sitting on a leaf; 
Basking in the sunshine 

For a moment brief; 
Soon the sun grows warmer — 

Dewdrop is not there; 
Dewdrop now has vanished — 

Vanished into air. 

Though happy like a dewdrop, 

Innocent and pure, 
Still I 'm happy longer, 

And of the cause I 'm sure. 
My happiness abideth 

And ever will endure, 
If thou, my dear, my own true love 

Art with me evermore! P 



The finest college publication which has come to 
ou_i table this year is The Inlander, the monthly mag- 
azine published by the students of The University of 
Michigan. Mr. F. \V. Pine, so well known here as a 
former Academy student, is its business manager. It 
contains forty-five pages of excellent literary matter, in- 
cluding stories, poems, and some excellent notes on live 
topies. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



FOOTBALL EXTRORDINARY. 

TWO NOTABLE VICTORIES. 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO AND THE HARVARD SCHOOL 
FAIL TO SCORE AGAINST LAKE FOREST. 

It is not often that Lake Forest's athletes are able 
to win for her two great victories in one afternoon, but 
that is just what was done on Saturday the 14th. The 
'Varsity eleven played the Chicago University team on 
their grounds, and succeeded in shutting them out by 
the score of 10-0. At the same time the doughty Cad 
team was pushing an eleven from Harvard School, 
Chicago, around the home field, with the resulting 
score of 22-0. Here is a showing for L. F. L T .! 

THE CHICAGO GAME. 

At 3.30 o'clock the teams lined up as follows: 

LAKE FOREST. CHICAGO. 

Hayner, capt right end Gale 

Rheingans " tackle Knapp 

H. Thorn " guard Ruhlkoetter 

Hunt center Wyant, capt. 

VVoolsey left guard Smith 

McGaughey " tackle Sykes 

Adams " end Neal 

C. Thorn right half Nichols 

D.Jackson, left half Allen 

A. Jackson quarter back Chace 

Williams full back Rapp 

Lake Forest opened the game with a flying wedge, 
by which Jackson gained twenty yards. By fine buck- 
ing the "red rushers" carried the ball over the goal line, 
scoring the first touch-down within five minutes. 
Williams kicked a goal in the face of a high wind. 
Score, 6-0. 

Chicago then took the ball and made a gain of seven 
yards on a wedge. Lake Forest fought hard and got 
the ball on a fumble. By a series of center plays the 
ball was advanced into Chicago territory, when it was 
lost. Chicago's full back, Rapp, then made a magnifi- 
cent iun down the field for thirty yards, finally stopped 
by Williams. Chicago could now make no more 
ground and punted for fifty yards. Here the first half 
ended. Score, 6-0. 

In the beginning of the second half Chicago seemed 
to have gained in strength and bucked Lake Forest's 
line with great effectiveness, but could not keep it up, 
and lost the ball on four downs. Here D. Jackson 
made a long run of forty yards around the right end, 
bringing the ball very near to Chicago's goal. C. 
Thorn and Williams then bucked the line for great 
gains, and finally shoved the leather over the line, scor- 
ing the second touch-down. No goal, score 10-0. 
At this point the game was virtually decided, as the 
champions of the orange were unable to advance the 
ball into Lake Forest territory. 

Among the features of the game were the long runs 
of lackson, unaided by good interference; the bucking 
of C. Thorn and Williams; the "snake-like wriggling" 



of Hayner; the strong, steady work of the line, and the 
hard, low tackling of Adams and Hayner. The new 
men on the team complimented their captain's judg- 
ment in their selection, showing cool heads and plenty 
of grit. The season has opened most auspiciously. 

L. F. A. VS. HARVARD. 

The Academy foot-ball team played its second game 
and won its second victory on Saturday. The elevens 
lined up as follows: 

L. F. A. HARVARD. 

Gates right end Furniss 

North left end Barrell 

Kennedy right tackle Folensbee 

Taylor left tackle Fisher 

Rice right guard Pettijohn 

Reinhart left guard Thompson 

McKinnie center Buckingham 

Woelfel quarter back Smith 

Campbell right half Kelley 

Miller left half Fargo 

Gilleland full back Welsh 

The Cads began the game with a flying wedge, 
making 20 yards, and then by repeated bucking reached 
Harvard's 5 yard line, when the ball was lost on a fumble. 
Harvard failed to gain in 4 downs, but again L. F. A. 
lost on a fumble. Harvard gained around the end, but 
losing possession of the pig-skin, L. F. A. forced it 
over the line, Woelfel kicking a goal. Harvard gained 
with a wedge, and by bucking, 20 yards. Then the 
Cads, by furious rushing, secured their second touch- 
down. No goal, score 10-0. 

In the second half Harvard was entirely unable to 
stop the heavy line bucks of the Cads, who made two 
touchdowns, Woelfel kicking both goals. Final score, 
22—0. 

It will be noticed that L. F. A.'s most successful play 
was bucking, which her strong center trio made pos- 
sible. The especial feature was Woelfel's and Rein- 
hart's tackling; the former's accurate goal-kicking; 
the end-runs of Campbell, North and Welsh, also Capt. 
Williams hopping about the scene upon his game leg. 



ENGLISH AS SHE IS WROTE. 

A Freshman thought chemistry tough, 

Till he found that the Prof, he could blough; 

He made use of his tongue, 

And although he was yongue, 
In time he became the riget stough. 

— Ez. 

He belonged to the Fifth Army Corps, 
And was just going out of the dorps, 

When a big iron weight 

Fell down on his pcight; 
'Twas dreadful the way that he sworps. 

— Ex. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ALUMNI. 

Mr. B. Fay Mills, of '79, gave an address on the 
twentieth of la6t month before the Congress of Re- 
ligions in Chicajjo on "Christ as the Savior of the 
World." No other address delivered during the whole 
Congress elicited such enthusiastic applause. The Chi- 
cago Tribune of the next day, after speaking of the 
tumult created by Mohammed Webb's defense of 
polygamy, continued: "A little later the great hall 
was again thrown into excitement; but this time it was 
a fever of approval which stirred the people to cheers. 
deep "Amens," and the waving of white handkerchiefs. 
It was B. Fay Mills, the evangelist, who roused the 
3,000 people, who listened in the height of enthusiasm." 
The Tribune gave the speech in full in two columns of 
minion type. 

Mrs. Reginald De Koven, of 'So, makes her home in 
New York City, where her husband is making a record 
as a hard worker as the dramatic critic of Harper's 
Weekly. In the course of a recent interview had with 
Richard Harding Davis by Charles S- Wells ('78 
Academy) for The Chicago Herald, Mr. Davis spoke 
of Mrs. DeKoven's Sunday evening receptions as 
bringing together the literary lives of the metropolis. 
Mr. Wells spent a delightful hour and a half with Henry 
Irving last Wednesday, which resulted in a most inter- 
esting acticle in the Chicago Sunday Herald. 

Miss A. L. Adams is teaching the grammar grades 
in Miss Brooks' select school in Chicago. Her address 
is S64 South Ashland avenue. Miss R. E. Adams has 
charge of the seventh and eight grades in the public 
schools at Palatine, 111., twenty-five miles northwest of 
Chicago. 

Miss Beatrice Taylor, for some time to come, will 
be at Dana, Ind., twenty miles north of Terre Haute. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Poole and family have returned to 
Chicago for the winter. 

The improvement of Westminister avenue from 
Mr. Warner's corner to Mrs. Fales's house, has just 
been completed. Three feet and one-half from the 
center of the road, on each side, two rows of tile were 
laid, the interveneing space being filled up with gravel. 
The approximate cost of the improvements is about 
$1,000. 

Although Ted Double has been selling liquors at his 
house, no direct evidence can be obtained to that effect. 
Beer has been sold there in bottles and in cases, and 
even whiskey can be had there. The trouble is, no one 
who has bought anything there wishes to testify of it. 
It would seem reasonable that when so much is known 
the town authorities should find some means of stopping 
the nuisance, but as vet it goes on unabated. 

Friday evening a freight engine blew out a cylinder- 
head, and several passenger trains were delayed for a 
half -hour. The freight train was switched to the side 
track by the engine of the 5.44 train for Chicago. 



The late sinking and floating of parts of the new 
block pavement were due to no fault of the pavement. 
In each case the sinking was caused hy the washing 
awav of part of the newly-laid ravine filling underneath, 
which, of course, had not had full time to settle. The 
pavement itself was in no way to blame, and in every 
other way is giving good satisfaction. The Stentor 
is glad to correct its mistake, and to say a word in 
behalf of the pavement. 

Proposals have been published for bids for improv- 
ing several streets in the southern portion of Lake 
Forest. While these streets will not be paved, there 
will still be several more miles of good roads. 

Rev. John McNeill, of London, met an immense 
and eager audience in the Lake Forest Pres. Church 
last Wednesday evening. lie easily held the attention 
of his hearers with his masterly and prolific mode of 
reading the Bible, and in his marvellous amplification 
of the last verses of the ninth chapter of Luke. The 
keynote of his address was " Obedience to God and not 
to Man." 

Rev. Wm. T. Elsing, a student in the Academy 
just after the great Chicago fire, now a worker among 
the jews in New York city, preached here last Sunday 
morning. Rev. Wm. F. Lewis, '90, of the Third 
Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, Del., preached in 
the evening. 

Next Wednesday evening, N. B. W. Gallwav, 
one of the "old boys" who has captained Lake Forest's 
foot-ball team, and has been a moving factor in every 
legitimate project of town or gown, will be ordained to 
the ministry. 



JUNIOR PARTY. 

On Monday evening, Oct. 2d, the young ladies of 
Junior class entertained their young gentlemen class- 
mates at the Aletheian Hall. Delightful tete a tetes, 
followed by just as agreeable refreshments, with a fish- 
ing party for mysterious souvenirs at the end occupied 
the evening. The invitations were out from eight to 
ten, but as one of the Junior young men thought this 
time rather short in which to catch his souvenir, he went 
at seven and in so doing laid himself open to the sus- 
picion of taking Prof. Eager's overcoat, which was 
missing. The coat has since been found, however, and 
we now are wondering who could have been so foolish 
as to think a Junior large enough to wear the aforesaid 
gentleman's coat. Mr. Hayner is now past danger, 
doing well in fact since he began treating his malady 
with the "Cure for Love." Considering the success of 
this evening it might be well for the other classes to 
imitate its dignified ( ?) example. 

Among the new books received by Prof. Stanley for 
the library this past summer the following are the most 
important: "New Concepts of Old Dogmas," presented 
by the author; "History of McCormick Seminary," by 
Le Roy J. Halsey, father of Prof. J. J. Halsey, pre- 
sented by the autbor; "Shea's History of the Catholic 
Church," in four volumes; " Tools and The Man," by 
Gladden, and $150 worth of German books on philo- 
sophy and phychology from Germany, among which is 
Hubardt's complete works. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE 


LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 


PUBLISHING COMPANY. 


Harry L. Bird, '94, 


Editor 


W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 
A. O. Jackson, '96, ) 


Locals 


David Fales, '96, 


Town 


Prop. J. J. Halsey, 


- Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 


Exchanges 


Miss Lucia Clark, ) 
Miss Louise Conger, > 


- Ferry Hall 


H. E. Gruenstein, I 
IS. S. Cutler, ) 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 


Advertising 




TERMS. 


Per Year, in advance, $1.50 


Single Copies, 


.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

SOME people always prophesy failure at the 
outset of every enterprise, in order that 
they may occasionally have the exquisite 
pleasure of saying: " I told you so." The 
fewer there are of such men in the university 

the better it will prosper. 

* * 
* 

WHAT is the key to success as a student? 
That is a question which interests almost 
every one during a greater or less period of 
their college life. But the answer is not far to 
find. There are just two essentials for faithful 
study — concentration and system. Lacking 
these qualities the efforts of even a brilliant 
mind will be resultless, but with them a slow- 
witted brain may achieve eminence. 

* * 
* 

IF ANYONE thinks that the work of a col- 
editor is a path of roses, he could soon be 
disillusionized by a little actual experience. 
The obstacles and petty vexations which have 
beset The Stentor from the beginning of the 
year to the present time would almost fill a 
volume. For example, among other misfor- 
tunes, a week ago a large amount of valuable 



" copy" was lost in the mail, and did not turn 
up for several days. Last year's finances also, 
like Banquo's ghost, would not "down" until 
resort was had to heroic measures. We refer 
to these facts, not for the purpose of gaining 
sympathy, but simply as a matter of explan- 
ation. From this time forward we expect that 
the paper will be able to pursue the even tenor 
of its way without serious breaks. While we 
cannot hope to ever reach the exalted ideal of 
the captious Waukegan Gazette, yet we do 
hope, with the co-operation of our students 
and friends, to make The Stentor take rank 

with the leading college papers of the West. 

# * 
* 

ANOTHER "FORESTER." 
Two years ago, in 1S91-2, the students of 
the University, in co-operation with the two 
College societies, published a neat and attrac- 
tive Annual, setting forth the features of the 
various departments, etc. Although it was the 
first publication of its kind ever issued from 
Lake Forest, it still compared very favorably 
with similar productions of older institutions. 
It was expected that after the way had been 
paved an Annual would be published yearly, 
but owing to miscalculations by the board of 
editors and a partial breach of faith on the 
part of the medical department, the Annual 
failed to pay expenses. This fact, together 
with the circumstance of there being two col- 
lege weeklies in the field, deterred the students 
from publishing the Annual last year. 

The last objection has now been removed, 
and the others can readily be met by careful 
management. Friendly feeling exists be- 
tween the departments of Lake Forest and 
those of Law and Dentistry, and Rush Medi- 
cal would no doubt be willing to help if it 
could be made to her interest to do so. The 
expenses can be met if the former mistakes in 
management are avoided. 

There is ample material and ample ability 
in the University to produce a first class 
Annual, and The University Stentor urges 
that the matter be considered at once. The 
old board was handicapped by lack of time, 
but if the work is pushed forward immediately 
that difficulty will not be encountered. Let us 
have another " F"orester." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLIEGE LOCALS. 

In the Chicago Herald of last Friday a picture of 
Dr. Coulter appeared, also extracts from the address de- 
livered by him at the Y. M. C. A. convention at Elgin. 
The address was spoken of very highly. 

The members of the foot-ball team appreciate the 
interest in their work shown by the Sems. Their pres- 
ence on the field during last week's practice seemed to 
brace the fellows up as much as did the coach. 

W. B. Brewster, '92, who came to Chicago to help 
celebrate Minnesota Day, called on us last week. 

Quite a number of the students have been in the city 
to see Henry Irving. No one who sees his superb rend- 
ering of "Shvlock" will ever forget it. 

Johnnie Jones is the only one we have met so far 
who was not at the Fair on Chicago Day. 

A glimpse at some of the men around the College 
will show us that the foot ball season is on in full force. 
On all sides you can see fellows limping painfully 
about on canes, or with black eyes, bruised noses, etc. 

Evanston students are engaged in the manual labor 
of erecting a fence about their athletic field. In fact 
they have returned to the primitive age of the "diggers," 
in their customs. Why should not Lake Forest men 
do the same ? Several have promised to assist in putting 
a track on our field, and in other ways bettering its con- 
dition. Certainly it is time that we got some of this fire 
which is doing Evanston students so much good. 

A convention was held at Galesburg, 111., on the 6th 
inst., composed of the representatives of High Schools 
and Preparatory Schools throughout the state. The 
object of the meeting was to take steps to organize an 
association to secure uniformity in the requirements of 
admission in the colleges and universities of the state, 
and to raise the general standard in the secondary 
schools. Two committees were appointed, one of 
which our Prof. Chas. A. Smith is chairman, to arrange 
for a meeting at the Teachers' Convention at Spring- 
field in December; another to make a report of mini- 
mum requirements at that meeting. 

Prof. M. Bross Thomas is supplying the Waukegan 
Presbyterian pulpit for the present. 

A bridge between the College and Art Buildings 
would fill a "long felt want." 

The class of '94 is at last ready for business. It will 
answer all challenges, whether from the literary, ath- 
letic, social or business world. The officers for the en- 
suing two terms are: President, Wm. B. Hunt; vice- 
president, Miss Eudora Smith; secretary and treasurer, 
W. B. Smith; sargent-at-arms, J. C. Lininger; foot- 
ball captain, H. Thorn. 

F. C. Sharon, '93, now of St. Louis, was in town 
last Sunday. 



Mr. Jenson is the latest post graduate in botanical 
work. He is a graduate of Wabash and has taught 
school for some years past. 

It is quite the "fad" among the professors to spend 
their Saturday's duck shooting on the lakes west of 
Lake Forest. Profs. Stevens and Thomas and Dr. 
Seeley emptied a few shells in this occupation last 
Saturday. 

Miss Brett, of Green Bay and Miss Liese, of Chi- 
cago, spent Sunday with Lake Forest Friends. 

A young gentleman of the Senior class for the past 
three years has had the reputation of being wholly im- 
impervious to all feminine charms. But behold! A 
certain young lady from " York State " pays a visit to 
the Fair, when suddenly our hero forsakes his books in 
order that he may visit the fair (with a large and small 
"F"). In fact, it is whispered that he swore he 
would either Dy-er see her. Thus are our idols shat- 
tered. 

The annual reception given bv Dr. Seeley at Ferry 
Hall will occur on Friday evening, the 27th. This 
will be a fitting close to the game with Northwestern, 
which is to take place at Evanston on the afternoon of 
the same day. The reception is thus early announced 
that the college societies may make arrangements for 
holding their meetings on Thursday evening instead of 
Friday, if they so desire. 

The annual convention of the Y. M. C. A., of 
Illinois, was in session at Elgin from Oct. 11th to 15th 
inclusive. The reports of town and college associations 
showed an increase over preceding year in attendance 
at devotional meetings, Bible and educational classes 
and number of conversions. The financial prospects 
were far more encouraging than could be expected 
during such hard times. Nearly three thousand dollars 
was raised by members of convention for State work 
during the last hour of Friday morning session. The 
annual address to the Convention, delivered by Dr. 
Coulter, was considered the leading feature. Dr. Coul- 
ter's subject was " The Strength of Young Men." He 
showed that the secret of the life of Christ lav in the 
fact that he so adjusted himself to his surroundings ast 
to secure the best development of his powers and bes 
results from his undertakings. Environment and adap- 
tation thereto are the two questions to be studied in 
every life. The sickness and absence of F. H. Burt 
were much regretted by' all college men. He was es- 
pecially missed in the section congress of college dele- 
gates. This congress, however, thanks to an able 
paper by W. M. Wood, of Indiana State University, 
'93, was very helpful. Robert Weidensall, of the Inter- 
national Committee, one of the oldest Y. M. C. A. 
workers of the country, gave two interesting addresses. 
Bible readings and studies given by Alexander Patter- 
son could not help but be very spiritual as Mr. Patter- 
son is a very spiritual man. Prof. Graham Taylor 
delivered an interesting address to a popular audience on 
Saturday evening. The Men's Gospel meeting on Sab- 
bath afternoon wasled by W. A. Sunday, of Chicago. At 
the Farewell Meeting, Sunday evening, many formed 
resolutions for more earnest work along association 
lines during the coming year. The L. F. men present 
were Drake. Waldo, Marshall, Haberli and Roberts. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



FERRY HALL. 

We welcome the arrival of two new students, Miss 
Beech and Miss Bemen. 

The new Senior phrase is, "Oh, to be a Junior!" 
We are sorry that this must originate in the autumn of 
'93, and in all probability be handed down to future 
classes with the music (?) box. 

Thursday evening we had a scare. Someone saw 
a spark of such unusual brightness that the cry of "fire" 
was raised immediately. It is whispered that a few on 
the first floor, believing in absence of body rather than 
presence of mind, took their pocket books and adjourned 
to the front lawn. We are glad to say that the cause 
of the commotion that looked so serious at first, proved 
to be nothing more than a chimney burning out. 

Prof. Eager entertained the English Literature class 
on Friday with a very interesting account of the Passion 
Play at Oberammergati, which he attended in 1S90. 

The meeting of the literary society on last Wednes- 
day was closed, therefore the report of the reporter 
cannot be reported. 

The first fancy dress party of the year was held in 
the gymnasium Friday evening. Description of 
costumes so "fearfully and wonderfully made" is impos- 
sible, but most of the old ones were to be seen, together 
with a few original ones. The girls were unanimous 
in announcing their intentions to "come again." 

In German, some girls get called upon, 
But do not read a line, 

And still get praised for what they've done — 
Oh! might such luck be mine! 

— Fro7ii a German Student. 

Miss Robinson gave a delightful afternoon tea to 
the Faculty, in honor of her sister from the East. 

Mrs. Storer, of Lansing Bay, N. Y., left for Rock- 
ford on Friday, after spending a week with Mrs. 
Seeley. 

Mrs. Caldwell spent Thursday with her cousin, 
Miss Mary E. Taylor. 

Miss Nightingale spent Sunday with Miss Welton. 

Master Reuben Demarest, Prof. Eager's protege, 
spent Sunday at Ferry Hall. 



FERRY HALL'S ENTRY LISTS. 

"A Tale of IVoc." 
For years the hat-rack and I have been the closest 
friends; never for one moment has any one thought of 
separating us. Together we have striven to accomo- 
date all who came to us for information. From time 
to time we have been moved by the trials and dis- 
appointments to which the young men have been sub- 
jected when, hastening joyfully to the Sem. to while 
away a pleasant hour, they have discovered that she 
for whom sweet smiles had been reserved, was already 
a pleasing monopoly for some fortunate youth in the 
back parlor. 



Again, we have been forced to smile as some sweet 
martyr to the cause came tripping down the corridor, 
seemingly the picture of consummate happiness. But 
having before been witnesses to such outward manifes- 
tations of joy, we could read back of those ethereal 
smiles — " What did he call on me for, anyway?" 
Many a time have I allowed the young gentlemen to 
twist and turn me at leisure,, tossing me first this way 
then that, — turning me round and round, until in their 
great excitement, I was made the innocent victim of all 
their angry outbursts — due to the tardiness with which 
the fair recipients of their cards responded. 

But alas! this privilege, like all those of Ferry Hall, 
has been abused. 

One day, not long ago, a young man called at the 
Seminary. Not having been here before in some time, 
he rushed up eagerly to see what changes had taken 
place in me. I noticed that he scrutinized me more 
closely than usual, and under his gaze I became a little 
nervous. Shortly I saw him looking first up, then 
down to the corridor, evidently to see if anyone were 
in sight. Satisfied with his search, he once more 
pounced upon me, but this time 'twas in a most formid- 
able manner. I clung more closely to my bosom 
frieud, but after a short struggle felt my hold relaxing, 
and we were cruelly torn asunder — the hat-rack and I. 
He did not sympathize with me as I had done with 
him, but held me securely in his grasp, and ere long I 
found myself gently laid away in my abductor's hip 
pocket. I was hurried away to the college, where I 
became a "bone of contention" for all who saw me. 

The scene changes again. I am now man}' miles 
from the scene of my abduction, and although lonely 
at times for familiar sights and sounds, I am happy, in 
that my possessor finds great pleasure in my company, 
and always introduces me to his friends. 

From my new home in Madison University I wish 
to send a little message to my compilers: namely this, 
that they fasten more securely my to-be-envied succes- 
sor, and so secure him from any such fate as befell me. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

During the present week all persons under eighteen 
years of age are admitted to the World's Fair for ten 
cents. Nearly all the students of the Academy are 
within this limit. The last and best opportunity to 
view the greatest of all modern works is now here. 
Let us, therefore, bring this petition before the Facultj', 
namelv, that they grant us Friday and Saturday of 
this week as holidays, at which time we can "finish up" 
the Fair. This certainly does not seem to be an im- 
modest request, when the Chicago schools are getting a 
full week as vacation. The Faculty has always given 
us holidays when it was fitting to do so, and we hope 
that they may see their way clear to grant the request. 

Last Saturday night the enthusiastic Cads sought to 
fire the slumbering spirits of the Sem. Thousands of 
barrels were consumed to commemorate the foot-ball 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



victories. As the sparks shot up into the heavens, a 
ghost dance, led by the somewhat material Mr. Ran- 
dolph, was performed. Although not provided with a 
derrick, admirers lifted Captain Williams, of the Aca- 
demy eleven, into the lawn chariot, and for a few 
moments he seemed completely carried away by this 
unexpected honor, which he had planned himself, but 
soon paused in front of the Hall where he was called 
upon for a speech. He arose to his feet, took in the 
flame-lit scene with his flashing eye, — and then left. 
His response to the encore was still more brief. Mr. 
Jaeger was Director of Festivities, and Mr. Reinhart 
Inspector of gasoline barrels. The melted barrel hoops 
will be utilized for hair ribbons by the Sems. 

P. S. The Director of Festivities requests for- 
mer barrel-owner to please present bills as soon as pos- 
sible, in order to facilitate business. 

The students of the Academy are pleased to see the 
liberal space allotted to the correspondents of that de- 
partment. A full page enables a fair representation of 
all the branches, and does not confine the Academy to 
a string of uninteresting notes. 

It will not do to lower the Academy reputation in 
the morning of our prosperity. The burning of gaso- 
line barsels certainly is no crime, but it is a crime to 
steal the property of others. Barrels are an article of 
price, and we should know this without first being noti- 
fied by barrel owners. 

The University librarian has for the second time 
sent a warning to us, announcing that we must either 
help support the College reading room, or be put out 
of the room if we are found there. That sort of hospi- 
tality can be bought most anywhere. 

" A German Table " is the cry of those students 
who attend German classes. Two years ago we had 
one and it proved to be a success. Brace up, Prof. 
Meyer, and make those fellows speak German at the 
table. 



ATHLETIC. 

The new athletic association has been formally or- 
ganized, and offcers and a board of directors elected. 
Prosessor D. H. Williams is president for the year, and 
R.J. McKinnie, vice-president, while Messrs. Thorn- 
ton and Campbell are secretary and treasurer, respec- 
tively. The board of directors consists of the four offi- 
cers and W. L. Jaeger. 

Next year the Academy foot-ball team will'probably 
unite with some athletic league. 

F. A. Hayner will soon organize gymnasium 
classes among the students of the Academy. 

On Nov. 4 the foot ball team will play the Morgan 
Park Academy team at Chicago. Other dates will be 
announced later. 



ACADEMY LACONICS. 
Additional new students are coming in every day. 

The prayer meeting last Tuesday evening was 
omitted on account of Rev. McNeill's sermon. 

Principal Smith represented the University at the 
convention at Galesburg last week. 

Judson Williams hurt his foot quite badly in a prac- 
tice foot-ball game last Thursday. 

A somewhat singular subject will be debated upon 
in the Tri Kappa society to-morrow. It is, — " Resolved 
that the Senate of the United States, should be 
abolished." 

Messrs. Hogg and Haenssler, of Monticello, Iowa, 
visited the Academy on Wednesday. 

We are jealous of the Principal of Ferry Hall. All 
good things are his. Within the castle on the lake 
shore are lots of girls, and without are numerous emptv 
kegs and barrels. 

Prof. Williams was visited a few da}'s ago by Mr. 
Evans, a former class-mate at Williams' College. 

Mr. H. F. Dickinson, who attended the Academy 
last year and played substiture tackle on the 'Varsity 
Eleven, is now a freshman at Madison, and is playing 
right end on the Wisconsin University team. 



EXCHANGES. 

A STUDY IN CAUSE AND EFFECT. 

An apple green, 
By an urchin seen, 

A howling touch of gripe. 
And now the lad 
Is with "the bad," 

Or of angelic type. 

—A Cad. 

The Kid spied a girl 

In town one day, 
Who was seated upon 

An old stairway. 

"May I sit with you, 

My lady fair?" 
She quickly gave him 
A vacant stare. — Ex. 
A little library, growing larger every year, is an 
honorable part of a man's history. Its a man's duty to 
have books. A library is not a luxurv, but one of the 
necessities of life. — Henry Ward Beecher. 

" To play foot-ball, or not to play foot-ball ? that is 
the question. Whether it is better to be maimed, 
bruised and disfigured, and pose as a hero, or remain in- 
doors poring over dry stores of knowledge, to grow 
sallow, thin and round shouldered." Yes, that is the 
question. The writer of the above must have tried 
something stronger than moral suasion in "making an 
opening" sometime. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



r 



THE PUTNAM 




Young Men's Clothing for College and 
Dress Wear a Specialty 

Nobby Black Cheviot Suits, Single and 
Double Breasted, Sack and Cutaway 
Styles at Reasonable Prices 



Overcoats 



Kerseys. 

Meltons. 

Chinchillas, 

Freize. 

Shetlands. 



BOX, CAPE, 
AND 
ULSTER 
SHAPE. 




Prices Positively the Lowest. 
Nobby Hats, Hosiery,- Underwear. 
New Styles of Neckwear Received 

every Saturday. 
Open Saturday Evenings. 




Putnam Clothing; House, 



131, 133 Clark Street, 



113, 115 117 Madison Street. 



C. M. BABBITT, Resident Partner. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH > 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
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Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
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dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
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quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

Tne most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son.. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
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are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
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and workmanship. 

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&~^> ' * 

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CLEANING AND REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 



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O PPOSITE 

N. END OF DEPOT. 



Lake Forest, III. 



TAKE ELEVATOR. 



Chicago, 




fOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 



MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 



ROBERT MERCER, 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
PIPES, AND 
STATIONERY. 

AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



OF 

faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, CHICAGO 

7Q DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 

THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooky's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9.50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



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ADDRESS, 

C F GUNTHER 

CONFECTOINER, 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



BRUBAKER 

Waukegan, III. 

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FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
126 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 



WEE GBiiEBREMEB PSSER 

D. R. COOVER, 

photographer, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON i- COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 




Zbe Craio press, 

{Printers, publishers, Designers 

178*1 82 flDonroe Street 

Chicago. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President, 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. 0. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J"- Is CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
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largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



. 



Vol. VII. 



October 24, 1893. 
> 1— i 



No. 4 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



AS FOLLOWS: 

1. LAKE FOPEST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. PUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

2. FEPPY HALL SEMINAPY. for young ladies. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SUPGEPY 

3. LAKE FOPEST COLLEGE. coeducational. 6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT LALE FOREST, ILL. AT CHICAGO, ILL. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE POOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French- 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Bibical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14I Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address, 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University. 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 





1 ' 


MARK 






JHIRT MAKERS AND 


MEN'S FURNISHINGS 




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• 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 




XTbe Graicj press, 

IPrtnters, ipublisbers, Designers 

178=182 ZlDonroe Street 
Cbicaoo. 

Purchase llor 
Books, 

Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



BRUBAKER 

^Ctrtisti® ®Pfi©t©g napfier® 

Waukegan, III. 

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NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
126 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 

5FBB GBUEBRflSPBB fSSER 

D. R. COOVER. 

(photographer, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building. 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 




pDMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 

IRotice to Hbvertisers. 

If for any reason you are not satisfied with 
the shape, size or position of your ad., please address 

C. B. Moore, advertising" agent, Lake Forest, 
do not let any little grievance like above named, run along 
indefmately and make it a cause for getting out of your 
contract. All that is possible will be done to correct any 
errors. 



The University S ten tor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1893 



No. 4 



THE POLICY OF RICHELIEU. 



FIRST PRIZE ORATION, ILLINOIS INTER-COLLEGIATE ORATORIAL ASSOCIATION CONTEST, 

GALESBURG, ILL., OCTOBER 6. 



By Charles F. Wishart, of Monmouth College. 



To decry absolutism, at all times and under all con- 
ditions, is a favorable task for demagagues and poli- 
ticians. To rocognize it as a necessary resultant of evil 
times and diseased conditions is the part of statesmen 
and philosophers. Pure democracy is ideal govern- 
ment. Its realization is only co-existent with the power 
of men to rnle themselves. It comes with the upward 
struggle of humanity, the checking of the animal and 
expansion of the spiritual. To develop and expand, it 
must be blessed with genial showers of education, 
warmed by the radiant sunbeams that emanate from 
Calvary's holy cross. Governments change as men 
change. Only when God reigns in the hearts of the 
people can the people reign. True democracy implies 
theocracy. Absolutism was the logical sequence of the 
middle ages. Strong central power was a necessity for 
nations steeped in ignorance and vice. The knee un- 
bent before the higher law of self control must bend 
before the lower law of force. For every where and al- 
ways the first requisite of society, the antecedent of gov- 
ernment, the primal principal of human policy, is law. 
Without it governments fall, society disintegrates, men 
become beasts. "Its seat is the bosom of Almighty 
God;" its power the Omnipotence that bent the azure 
dome of heaven and lit it up with glittering star fire; its 
voice the thundering music of ten thousand whirling 
spheres. Wherever God is, there is law. The atheist 
is the only consistent anarchist. Palsied be the impious 
hand that aims a blow at law! But him who strikes in 
its defense, judge not too harshly, though the world 
proclaims him as a tyrant! 

Such an onewas Cardinal Richelieu, diplomat, states- 
man, tyrant; the model of absolutists, the master spirit 
of two centuries of French polity, the man who ruled 
chaos. Entering the vicious politics of the court of 
Louis XIII, he found a jealous nobility, a corrupted 
clergy, an ignorant, restless people, a nation unfitted for 
self-rule. Facing the two alternatives of absolutism or 
national disintegration, he chose the former. Obsequi- 
ous to strength, tyrannical to weakness, a Jesuit for in- 
trigue, a Robespierre for cruelty, a Napoleon for in- 
domitable will and purpose, he climbed his way to fame 
and power over broken oaths and treacherous alliances; 
he held them in the face of a capricious king and a 
hostile court by his sleepless cunning, his mighty intel- 



lect and the shed blood of his presumptuous rivals. Be- 
fore his iron septre Disorder fled affrighted. Beneath 
his magic touch the Golden Lilies blossomed forth on 
every plain and hill top. If he was a tyrant he believed 
tyranny better than anarchy. If he preserved the dross 
of absobutism, he preserved with it the pure gold of 
social order and permanency. Rejecting the glittering 
casket of individunl license that held destruction to the 
state, he chose the leaden casket of tyranny which con- 
cealed the sacred treasure — law. 

But it was an inevitable resultant of his character and 
times that his system should be false. Diseased condi- 
tions foster diseased policies. A necessity of a restless 
age, his system partook of the falsehoods that gave it 
birth. Richelieu checked disintegration. But when he 
checked the natural expansion of individual rights, 
when he sought to make absolutism progressive rather 
than retrogressive, lie crossed purposes with the great 
economy of God. Three barriers stood against futur e 
aggression of the kings. The nobles, embodying the 
old spirit of feudal independence; the parliaments, 
standing for justice; and the Huguenots, striving for re- 
ligious freedom. All were met and crushed by Rich- 
lieu. With mighty arm, the Chaos Ruler fettered Lib- 
erty, and set the Bourbon dynasty to watch her dungeon 
cell. For two long centuries she lay imprisoned. 
Powerless, hopeless, the people suffered on. Fiercely 
the cruel lash of tyranny was plied over the backs of 
bleeding millions. While gaunt famine stared the na- 
tion in the face, the Bourbons wrung the last penny 
from the peasant's store to deck with golden lilies the 
glittering bovvers and palaces of gay Versailles, aye, to 
encircle a lewd harlot's brow with coronets of gold and 
gleaming gems. With every new regime, the power 
of king and court increased. "The state!" cried haughty 
Louis, "I am the state." Ah, proud Richelieu, with 
thy dreams of absolute power, of universal empire and 
a world subservient to a cardinal's beck and call, didst 
thou e'er dream of this? Didst thou wear out thy 
mighty life of thine in plans and schemes and and pro- 
jects universal, that a truckling varlet, who made a 
mockery of chastity and brute-like toyed with every 
virtue, should through thy plans proclaim himself "the 
state?" Ill fared it with thee that thou didst forget 
poor, fettered, tortured Liberty, who by and by arose, 



4 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



and tearing off the shackles from her fevered limbs, 
forged that grim death sword which drank its fill of Bour- 
bon blood; and that thine ears were deaf unto her wail- 
ing, anguished cry which sounded forth through every 
land and taught all tyrants that the people are " the 
state." 

While the great cardinal lived, his own might} per- 
sonality cheeked many abuses inherent to his system. 
The man mastered the policy. But when the master 
died, no man in all the realm could conjure with his 
magic wand. He had invoked the spectre of Aggres- 
sive Absolutism, and it would not down. Heaven help 
the nation whose policy depends on personality ! Alex- 
ander ruled the world. His system crumbled at a touch 
when the Macedonian warrior died. Cromwell 
mastered England. His policy withered in the grasp 
of a weakling son. Nay, the policy thai lives must be 
built on principles mightier than any man. Richelieu 
courted men and hated principles. Against the ever 
enduring idea of individual rights he arrayed a mere 
ephemeral policy, forgetting that the heart unmoved 
by a mere policy throbs and quickens under the touch 
of a principle. Right or wrong, give men a tangible, 
glowing ideal, and they make of it a battle cry, em- 
blazon it upon their banners, love it, live for it, die for 
it. And if it be a right principle, touched and quickened 
by the holy fire of God's eternal truth, statesmen can- 
not control it, armies cannot conquer it, statutes cannot 
hedge it in. Every armor gleam of Progress, every 
blood-stained battle-field of martyrs, every footprint of 
the Almighty down the centuries, proclaims it invin- 
cible. 

But the ultimate fate of any policy is that which it 
makes supreme, its king. Whether the dominating 
power be a man or idea, if it be true, the system is true, 
if it be false, the system is false and must perish. Rich- 
elieu's policy made men supreme and principles subordi- 
nate. Aye, worse than that, they were false men. 
Alexander was a king. Charlemagne, Napoleon, Peter 
t'he Great, all were kings, regal in character and act. 
But these hapless Bourbons, to whom the cardinal gave 
the sceptre of absolutism, were not kings. The state 
needed rulers; these men were puppets. The nation 
reverenced strength; their so-called kings were weak- 
lings, moral and intellectual. The people begged for 
bread; the Bourbons gave them a stone. In peaeeful 
times the dogma that "he is a king who is born the son 
of a king" may indeed be harmless. But when men 
are aroused to think and do, kings must have brains as 
well as blood, and nations reverence character, not 
genealogies. Even to-day the curse of inherited great- 
ness lives. Lives? It makes of Europe one vast armory 
and arsenal, battens on sacred life and treasure, while 
ever and anon 

"The blood red blossom of war with a heart of fire" 
flames forth at the bidding of royal imbeciles and he- 
reditary accidents. 



Nor let America boast perfection to her sister na- 
tions. Here, thank God, is no hereditary curse. But 
have we not bowed the knee before false kings? Are 
we not crowning Avarice, Selfishness, Mammon? Has 
not the voice of demagogues and mobs proclaimed 
"long live these kings?" What means the strike, the 
trust, the panic, the sullen clash at blood-stained Home- 
stead ? Shall the avarice of the classes and the frenzy 
of the masses paral} ze our industries, replace the ham- 
mer with the dynamite bomb and raise the echoing cry 
of "bread or blood" in Denver or Chicago as in Paris' 
streets of old? Shall Anglo-Saxon blood and Anglo- 
Saxon lineage furnish forth a Danton, a Marat, a Robe- 
spierre. 

On the eve of the fatal day that saw the fall of the 
Bastile, ill-fated Louis, turning upon his luxurious bed 
of down, exclaimed, "What, this is a revolt!" "Sire," 
said Liancourt with gleaming eye and omnious tone, 
"it is not a revolt — it is a revolution." And the death 
sentence of the false kings of Richelieu had been pro- 
nounced. To-day, in the first dawning twilght of the 
twentieth century, King Avarice, backed by the mighty 
hosts of his twin ally Ignorance, strong in the hope of 
vicious class legislation, reveling in the senseless sec- 
tional strife of East and West, hears above the politici- 
an's clamor an ominous note of warning from the great 
intelligent, God-fearing middle class — the bone and 
sinew of our christian civilization. " Can this mean a 
revolt?" throbs the anxious question. Sounding from 
the pulpit, the press, the school room, from every heart 
that throbs responsive to the great heart beat of the re- 
public, comes back the answer, "It is not a revolt, O 
King; but in the name of blood-fought free America, 
by the sacred banner of the Crucified One, it is a revo- 
lution." Heed the cry, false king! Never has it 
sounded for humanity in vain. Heed it! For it shall 
ring destruction's knell around thy craven soul. It is 
the old voice of the Huguenot and Puritan. Thunder- 
ing from the lips of Luther and Knox and Calvin it 
proclaimed those mighty principles which Richelieu 
hated and France expelled, yet which have become the 
only hope for our republic, which triumphed in the 
triumphs of Washington and Grant, which nerved and 
strengthened the heroic arm of that stainless knight of 
God's own chivalry — Abraham Lincoln. Stronger than 
politicians, mightier than sectional differences, grand 
arbiter of the destinies of nations, those principles shall 
yet bring forth not a "Reign of Terror" but a blood- 
less revolution in the hearts of an educated citizenship, 
winning back the sceptre for thorn-crowned Truth, con- 
quering avarice with love, the lower law with the higher 
law, the rule of gold with the Golden Rule, Gibraltar's 
power with the Rock of Ages. And in that dawning 
day of true democracy the glow of blood-red Mars must 
fade away. But clearer, brighter, grander still shall 
gleam forth Bethlehem's holy star — the Star of Universal 
Empire. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



EVIDENCES OF PROGRESS. 

Our students are just beginning to realize the vast 
improvement the College has received in the new 
courses or studv introduced this year. In a recent 
number of Harper's Weekly a celebrated Columbia 
professor is quoted as saying, in reply to the question 
as to what college had the best course: "The curriculum 
of the University of Indiana is the best in the United 
States." Our new curriculum, it is hardly necessary to 
add, is identical with that of Indiana University. It is 
the system approved by advanced and careful students 
of education, and its adoption here is of itself sufficient 
proof that we in Lake Forest have a President and 
Faculty who are animated by modern ideas in regard 
to higher education. There are ten points in the new 
curriculum which are worthy of note: 

1. It puts all departments upon an equal footing. 

2. It permits continuous work in any department. 

3. It makes advanced work in any subject possible. 
_|. It prevents patchy courses and homeopathic doses 

of any subject. 

5. It defers permanent choice of subjects as long as 

possible, and is flexible enough to meet every 
need. 

6. Its required work gives breadth of training, and 

its major subject develops power. 

7. It compels an individual account and makes rapid- 

ity of advancement depend upon individual 
merit. 

S. It permits the college to graduate students of 
higher training from every department. 

9. It recognizes students as men and women of seri- 
ous purpose, ready to seek advice, but able to 
exercise independent judgment. 
10. It associates Lake Forest with those progressive 
institutions which seek to utilize all that is good 
in old methods, but which believe that wider ex- 
perience and new subjects demand considera- 
tion. 

To meet the demands of this broader work, a con- 
siderable 

ADDITION TO THE FACULTY 

has been made. A teacher in Modern Languages and 
an instructor in Chemistry and another in Botany are 
direct additions to the teaching force, while the chair 
of English has been greatly strengthened. A few 
weeks ago The Stentor mentioned these gentlemen, 
but a few words more as to their work and records may 
not be amiss. 

Geo. W. Schmidt, Ph. B., Ph. M., who will devote 
himself to the students of German, is not unknown to 
the older residents, having taught in the Academy a 
few years ago. Mr. Schmidt was born in a German 
colony in Minnesota, and lived as truly a German for 
the first fifteen years of his life as though he had been 
reared in " the fatherland." He was educated first at 
Northwestern College, Naperville, Ills., a small Ger- 



man college, where he took a thorough course in Ger- 
man grammar, rhetoric and literature. He entered the 
junior class at Syracuse University (N. Y.),and gradu- 
ated in 'SS. The year following he went to Europe, 
and spent several months in South Germany. At the 
University of Strasburg he devoted some time to the 
Allmannic dialect. Returning, he taught two years in 
Lake Forest, and then for three vears in the Prepar- 
atory and later in the College departments of North- 
western University. While at Evanston he also 
carried on post graduate work in Gothic. 

Mr. P. A. Seymour graduated at Ann Arbor two 
years ago, and then took up graduate work in his 
specialty — chemistry. He is thoroughly at home in 
this field, and is already becoming a favorite with his 
students. 

Mr. E. B. Uline is a graduate and post graduate of 
Indiana University, having occupied the position of In- 
structor in Botany. He comes in charge of the Herb- 
arium and Systematic Botany, and is also engaged in 
Monograph work. 

Prof. A. E.Jack, M.A., is too well known to need 
any introduction to Lake Forest readers. He is the 
first of our college's alumni to find a chair in the faculty. 
After graduating in 'S4 he took a theological course at 
Princeton, from thence going to Germany, where he 
studied until forced to return by poor health after a 
year and and a half of work. His two years as pro- 
fessor of English in the Academy proved him capable 
of a wider field, and his work thus far in College has 
more than met the high expectations entertained. It 
has been a common complaint, more or less well sup- 
ported, that for the last few years the English depart- 
ment was the weakest spot in College, but if such was 
the case in times past, it certainly is not true at present. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Moss have returned from a 
hunting trip in the Northwest. 

Miss Rice is visiting with Mrs. McClure. 

Miss Taber and Miss Adams are visiting with Mrs. 
S. R. Taber. 

Tuesday morning, Oct. 17, a woman was killed at 
Highland Park by the tram which leaves Lake Forest 
at S o'clock. The woman was deaf, and although the 
gates were down, persisted in crossing the track, with 
this fatal result. 

Last Wednesday evening Mr. N. B. W. Gallwey 
was ordained as a minister of the gospel at the Presby- 
terian Church. The Rev. Dr. Patterson presided, as- 
sisted by Dr. McClure, Prof. Thomas, Prof. Zenos of 
McCormick Seminary, and Rev. W. F. Lewis of 
Wilmington, Delaware. Prof. Thomas preached, Dr. 
McClure delivering the charge. Dr. Gallwey will 
take the co-pastorship of a North Side church, Chi- 
cago, and will also continue the work on the creche, 
which he has already begun. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE 


LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 


PUBLISHING COMPANY. 


Harry L. Bird, '94, 


Editor 


W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 
A. O. Jackson, '90, ) 


Locals 


David Fales, '96, 


Town 


Prof. J. J. Halsey, 


- Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 


Exchanges 


Miss Lucia Clark, ) 
Miss Louise Conger, > 


- Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, ) 
B. S. Cutler, \ 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 


Advertising 




TERMS. 


Per Year, in advance, $1.50 


Single Copies, 


.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

WE print this week the oration which took 
first prize over Lake Forest at the recent 
Galesburg contest. A comparison of the two 

productions may be interesting. 

* * 
* 

OUR readers are asked to keep our adver- 
tisers in mind when making purchases. 
The advertisers contribute directly to the sup- 
port of the paper, and hence indirectly to the 
upbuilding of the University. Without excep- 
tion, they will be found to be reliable men, and 

worthy of patronage. 

* * 
# 

LAKE FOREST is to be congratulated in 
having for her president a man who takes 
an interest in matters which are, in a sense, 
outside the regular order of study. Dr. Coulter 
has shown an appreciation of athletics which 
was to be expected of a man of his broad and 

vigorous personality. 

* # 
* 

THE suggestion in regard to an Annual has 
met with considerable approval. We 
have frequently heard it remarked that "the 
'Forester' was the best thing the University 



ever published." It seems altogether fitting 
that an Annual should be published this year. 
It would serve to commemorate the improve- 
ments and many forward steps which mark 
the inauguration of the "new era." There has 
been some question as to the method to be 
pursued in choosing a board of editors. Prob- 
ably the most feasible plan was the one fol- 
lowed by the first "Forester," namely, to have 
the two college societies each elect an equal 
number of men — perhaps five — and they in 
turn would make the arrangements with the 
other departments. Let us start the ball rolling. 



* * 

* 



FOOTBALL. 

IT is a pleasure to note the increased interest 
in football on the part of the student body. 
A feeling of intelligent interest in athletics is 
very desirable, and is, in fact, the best indi- 
cator of a healthy "college spirit." It is this 
feeling which has made Yale so uniformly suc- 
cessful in athletics, and it is the lack of this 
spirit which has been so lamented at Chicago 
University and at Northwestern. Our victory 
over Chicago proved the team to be a strong 
one, while the Academy boys, by their two 
victories, fully sustained the good reputation 
of that department. Thus the players are 
helped to do more and better work, and are 
not entirely discouraged by their first defeat. 
For there is no reason to be discouraged 
by the results of the Madison game. 
Wisconsin has always had a strong 
eleven, and her men are very much 
heavier than ours. Lake Forest's heaviest 
back was unable to play, while some of the 
men who did take part in the game were in a 
crippled condition. In a school the size of 
ours, when a few of the strong players are dis- 
abled there are none competent to take their 
places, so the whole team is at a great disad- 
vantage. 

There are several games yet to play, in 
which Saturday's loss may be retrieved. To 
the students we say, don't find fault with the 
team, but help them in every way you can. 
To the players we simply quote the words of a 
famous general: "Up, boys, and at 'em!" 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THE MADISON GAME. 



LAKE FOREST OVERCOME BY WISCONSIN S SUPERIOR 
WEIGHT. 

The foot-ball team, enforced by Nott, Flint and F. 
S. Mellen, left at S o'clock Saturday morning for Madi- 
son, where they arrived at 12:25, after a tiresome jour- 
ney. They immediately found their way to the Park 
Hotel and to dinner. Shortly after the team was on its 
way down State street to the grounds, where a large 
crowd was already assembled. After a little promiscu- 
ous tumbling about, game was called and the contest be- 
gan. 

Promptly at 3 o'clock the teams appeared on the 
field. The names and positions of the plavers were as 
follows: 

LAKE FOREST. 

Hayner, capt 

Rheingans 

H. Thorn 

Hunt 

Woolsey 

McGaughey 

Rice 

A. Jackson 

D. Jackson, 

Adams 

Williams 



right end 
" tackle 
" guard 
center 
left guard 

" tackle 

" end 
quarter back 
left half 
right half 

full back 



WISCONSIN. 

Dickinson 

Davis 

Jacobs 

Kull 

Burge 

Freeman 

Sheldon 

Lyman, Capt. 

Karel 

Nelson 

Richards 



The Wisconsin team was the larger and heavier of 
the two. They were strengthened by Davis, their 
coach, an old Princeton foot-ball man, who played right 
tackle throughout the game. Lake Forest took the ball 
first, and opened with a flying wedge, making but ten 
yards. Jackson took the ball for four yards around the 
end. The center was tried next, with no gain. Wil- 
liamson managed to get three yards through one side, 
and Adams one, before the ball went to Madison on 
four downs. 

It was apparent from the first that Madison was too 
heavy for Lake Forest. Every line man was from 
thirty to fifty pounds heavier than the Lake Forester 
opposite, and the backs in the same proportion. Lake 
Forest, therefore, did not have much success in bucking, 
but, however, stopped Madison's rushes well, several 
times keeping them for four downs on one spot. 

Madison's first attempt with the pigskin was unsuc- 
cessful, Hayner getting it on a fumble. Again Lake 
Forest knocked at Madison's center with no success, 
losing the ball on four downs. Nelson made four 
yards for Madison, brought down by a beautiful tackle 
of Williams. Karel made a like gain, getting through 
the line, tackled by D. Jackson. Again they made sev- 
eral yards through the center. Lake Forest had not 
begun to hold yet, and the ball was already approaching 
their twenty-five yard line. Madison's next play was a 
revolving wedge, a play which seemed to be their main 
stand-by. Lake Forest seem to stop the wedge very 
fairly, but nearly every time one man would come 
popping out of the scrimmage and gain from 3 to 10 
yards for Madison. Four attempts with the wedge 
took the ball over Lake Forest's goal for a touchdown. 
Richards kicked a goal. Score — Madison 6, Lake 
Forest o. Lake Forest opened again with a flying 
wedge, making 9 yds., but could get no farther ahead, 
and lost the ball on Williams' kick of 35 yds. Madison 
was given 5 yds. because Nelson was tackled on a fair 



catch. Madison then made several rushes through the 
center, in which Woolsey and Rice tackled well. Then 
Richard goes around the right end, behind a fine inter- 
ference, and after a run over half ihe Held, makes a 
second touchdown, from which no goal was kicked. 
Madison 10, L. F. o. 

Lake Forest now plavs a defensive game, keeping 
Madison well back by good kicking of Williams. 

Madison's third touchdown was gained by good end 
rushes, with fine interference, and by more of the re- 
volving turtle-back. No goal was kicked. Madison 
14, Lake Forest o. The first half ended with the ball 
on Madison's 25 yd. line. A. O. T a ^kson now dis- 
covered that his nose had been broken, so Woelful 
took his place. The second half was a repetition of the 
first, except that Lake Forest did better line work. 
Rice tackled well on his end, while Hayner often 
elicited the shouts of the audience for his fine playing 
in all parts of the field. 

Lake Forest, in the words of a U. of W. man, 
won the admiration of their opponents, holding the 
line solid, and preventing confident rushes. Neverthe- 
less, Madison slowly crept up to the 10 yd. line, but 
was put back again by good kicking. The fourth 
touchdown was secured by the wedge again. No goal. 
Madison iS, L. F. o. 

By some fine rushes of D. Jackson for from 25 
to 40 yds., and by a few desperate bucks, Lake Forest 
took the ball back to Madison's 3 yd. line, but was un- 
able to get a touchdown. Madison takes the ball down 
down the field for another touchdown and goal. Score 
— 24-0. 

The last of the game saw the prettiest football 
playing. D. Jackson ran 40 yds. with no interference, 
dodging several men, but was stopped by an unfortun- 
ate stumble. 

Madison drove the ball to L. F. 3 yd. line, and then, 
with only 30 seconds to play, tried again and again to 
push L. F. back, but unavailing])- — L. F. would not 
budge. The eager referee ran one minute over time, 
but yet L. F., with a superb determination, held Madi- 
son's heavy lines still, and time was called with the ball 
on L. F.'s 3 yd. lice. Vance had taken Hayner's place 
for the last 5 minutes, and made good tackles in his 
few minutes. 

Umpire, Flint; Referee, 

Time, 1.27. 

SATURDAY'S GAMES. 

University of Chicago, 10; Ann Arbor, 6. A 
strong game, characterized on the part of Chicago by 
the good work of Allen, guard; Raycroft, quarter; 
and Flint, Bliss and Nichols, half-backs. 

The games between Northwestern and the Uni- 
versity of Illinois was called on account of darkness, 
nnd the score reverted to the end of the first half, 0-0. 
Both teams had scored two touchdowns in the second 
half. The Illinois team is remarkably light, averaging 
only l S3 z /2 pounds. They made a wonderful good 
showing against their heavy opponents. Jewitt, Van 
Doozer, Williams and Noyes played well for Evanston. 

Princeton 46, Cornell o. 

Harvard 36, Dartmouth o. 

Yale 50, Orange Athletic Club o. 

West Point 12, Amherst 4. 

Pennsylvania University 40, Crescent Athletic 
Club o. 

Y'ale Freshmen 16, Mass. Ag. College o. 

Minnesota 36, Grinnell 6. — This game is termed 
by the reports "an unrestrained slugging match." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ATHLETICS. 

Football is the all prevailing topic nowadays, and 
the enthusiasm seems to be higher this fall than ever 
before. Every man, " 'varsity " or " scrub," makes it 
his business to be out when able. This is the right 
spirit, as nothing can be accomplished withont this 
enthusiasm. Coaching and training tables cannot make 
a strong team when it is lacking. The 'varsity has 
been helped wonderfully by the coaching of Messrs. 
Seixas and Currens. Not only has the team work im- 
proved, but the individual play has been helped very 
much. There are several hard games before us, and 
nothing but hard work can win them, so "let the good 
work go on." 

In last week's locals the question was asked: Why 
Lake Forest students should not hustle and build a 
fence around the athletic field, and also put in a running 
track. In the first place, the students have been told 
that the field is not a permanent one, but is to be used 
as the site of a building in the near future. Secondly: 
When the field was graded it was left in such shape 
that one side was about ten feet lower than the other. 
This could not be mended without going to a large ex- 
pense, ane unless it is leveled no track could be pieced 
upon it, for every time that there was rain it would be 
washed out. A running track should be level, and not 
up and down hill. 

All the members of the football team have been re- 
marking what a gentlemanly lot of fellows play on the 
Chicago team. They presented a striking contrast to 
the teams we are accustomed to meet. 

Football games yet to be played are: 
Northwestern at Evanston, October 27 and Nov. 1 1. 
Beloit College at Lake Forest, Nov. 4. 
First National Bank Clerks, Chicago, at Lake Forest, 

Nov. 7. 
University of Illinois at Champaign, Thanksgiving 
Day. 
The manager is also trying to arrange a game with 
Wabash. 

NEEDS OF THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

The Athletic Association of Lake Forest College 
and Academy is in better financial condition than ever 
before. This is largely due to the strictly economical 
policy of the present management of the football team, 
also to the generous response of the students and faculty 
to the call for money. Some have not yet been called 
on. These will aid the Association very much in its 
plans by making their subscriptions as soon and as large 
as possible. Others, who apparently are perfectly able 
to give, make as an excuse for not doing so answers not 
unlike the following: — "What good does it do any 
way?" "It wasn't managed well last ) ear," "You never 
win games," or "I belong to the Academy Association," 
all of which answers have a greater or less amount of 
truth in them, but which as valid reasons for not sub- 
scribing are as lame as Senator Fry's old knee-sprung 
mule. Come up and "sign that parchment." You 
don't want to see your teams fail to win for lack of 
proper equipment and training. And yet that is their 
fate unless you support them. We need a level field 
with a track and fence about it. These are essential to 
successful athletics. Other colleges about us are mak- 
ing rapid advance along these lines. Let us not lag 
behind. Seeing us at work our trustees and friends 
will no doubt be glad to lend their assistance. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Prof. Halsey has an excellent short article in The 
Dialiox Oct. 1st. on "Economical and Statistical Studies 
at Chicago. 

The Z. E. society is making efforts to secure a date 
for some evening next month with Mr. Leland T. 
Powers, the famous entertainer. 

W. T. Chappe, '93, was in town last week. 

Clarence Church, an old Academy student, visited 
friends one day last week. He is now engaged in the 
lumber business. 

Dr. Coulter on Monday morning, in a few happy 
remarks, congratulated the team on their victory against 
Chicago University. Such encouragement as this is 
highly appreciated and will contribute largelv to the 
success of the team. 

Pictures of several of the foot-ball men appeared in 
the Chicago Record of Oct. 14. It is said that Hunt 
has ordered an extra edition of that date. 

Chas. Thorn, who was hurt in the Chicago game 
has been confined to his room for the past week. His 
injuries are quite severe and it is impossible to say when 
he will be able to go upon the field again. A. O. Tack- 
son was also slightly injured in practice last week. 

Dr. Seeley savs the bon-fires are coming a little too 
fast. He will have to come to some agreement with 
the Cads, as the college men have not as yet indulged 
in a single fire. 

We will positively play Northwestern at Evanston 
on what is known as their University Day, Friday Oct. 
27. It is to be hoped that the departments out here 
will close that afternoon, and that every student will 
consider it his or her duty to go to Evanston and veil 
for the team. 

If "practice makes perfect" we see no reason why 
Tedrickson should not win the contest in declamation, 
hands down. At almost any hour of the day or night 
one may hear the gentle mur of his voice, or if in his 
immediate neighborhood one is liable at any moment 
to come in contact with his powerful gestures. 

Several of the faculty and students attended a Latin 
play of Plautus, rendered at Festival Hall on Thursday 
last by the students of St. Xavier's College, New York. 

President Coulter has a love for work which is 
truly inspiring. Mr. Latimer has been ill for some 
time past and has finally been obliged to go to a sani- 
tarium in Danville, N. Y. for health and rest. His 
work has developed on President Coulter. He also 
makes it a duty to dessiminate Lake Forest light in the 
"dark places" of Illinois and Wisconsin. After having 
addressed the Illinois State Y. M. C. A. convention at 
Elgin he went into Wisconsin and delivered addresses 
at the Y. M. C. A. State convention held at Beloit, and 
the meeting of the Synod of Wisconsin at LaCrosse. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



On the evening of the iSthinst. he addressed the Synod 
of Illinois at Peoria. 

The Herbarium is now well supplied with botanical 
reading matter. On its reading table are about fifteen 
of the best botanical magazines published, and on file 
are about thirty-five more. 

Last year wc had a flourishing chess club and played 
a series of about forty games; Mr. Linn, '93, won the 
tournament, losing only half a game in the whole series. 
The object of the club is to increase the interest in chess 
throughout the University. The only requirement for 
admission is that a man wishes to learn the game or is 
already a player. Next Thursday, Oct. 26th, there will 
be a meeting in the college building at 1 115 p. m., to 
reorganize the club and elect officers for the ensuing 
year. The Executive Committee earnestly request all 
who are interested in the game to be present; faculty, 
post-graduates and students are included. 

Mr. R. Kissling, of Portland, Oregon, was the 
guest of Mr, Adolph Habuli for a few days last week. 
Mr. John Venneura, of Menominee, Mich., spent 
Sunday with Mr. Bird, and other friends. 

"The song that broke my heart" — the telegram from 
Madison last Saturday afternoon. 

Prof. Bridgman now has a class in the Greek Testa- 
ment, which meets at noon each Sunday. 

"Jack" Shepherd, formerly of the Academy, was 
married on Monday, Oct. 23, to Miss Thyra Richardson 
of Highland Park. 

While we cannot yet boast of a separate library 
building, still our library is no longer "cooped up" into 
a small space into which light and air could hardly pene- 
trate. The room has been doubled in size, the ventila- 
tion and light are good, and in addition, it is open many 
more hours than formerly. 

At the regular meeting of the Zeta Epsilon Society 
on Friday evening the exercises were as follows: De- 
bate, "Resolved that the Government should own and 
control railroads." Affirmative, H. Thorn, G. M. 
Dearlove; negative, F. A. Hayner, F. Moriette. Deci- 
sion of judges, two for affirmative, one for negative. 
Declamation, E. R. Dodge, "Governor Altgeld and the 
Anarchists;" Dean Lewis. Critique, A. P. Bourns. The 
next meeting of the socieiy will be held on Thursday 
instead of Friday coming, owing to the Ferry Hall re- 
ception. 

The meeting held by the Athenians on Friday was 
known as a " Holme's Evening." Criticisms of Holmes 
and his works were given by Harry Goodman, C. O. 
Parish and A. C. Jackson. Selections from his works 
were given by D. Fales, W. E. Rustin,J. A. McGaughey 
and Dr. Jackson. Quite a number of visitors including 
several young ladies were present. 

Considerable new furniture has been added to the 
hall, including tables and a piano lamp, greatly im- 
proving the general appearance of things. 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Lida Fife, '90, of Pasedena, Col., paid a short 
visit to Miss Conger, on Friday. 

Mrs. Gait, of Sterling, 111., visited her daughter, 
Miss Julia, on Friday. 

Miss Mabel Messenger, who attended Ferry Hall 
last year, is now studying music in Boston. 

Mrs. James A. Lonsburv, nee Greenlee, '90, has re- 
turned from Denver, Col., and is settled for the winter 
at 3S5 Ashland Boulevard. 

The bon-fire of Saturday, Oct. 14, was greatly 
enjoyed by all. The grounds being so brightly illu- 
minated, the graceful poses of the actors were especially 
pleasing to the artistic eye. 

We wish to express to the foot-ball elevens of both 
College and Academy our sincere congratulations, and 
to wish them success in the future. 

Rev. and Mrs. Bird, of Pennsylvania, visited Thurs- 
day with their cousin, Miss Laura Bird. 

The happiest, merriest evening thus far, at least to 
the Juniors, was Friday, Oct. 20th, when they were so 
royally entertained by the Seniors in the gymnasium, 
which was transformed into a beautiful banquet hall. 
In the center of the room, the tables, prettily decorated 
•with autumn leaves and the Senior colors, yellow and 
white, were arranged in the form of a cross. The elab- 
ates upper, during which there was music, was fol- 
lowed by dancing and music. 

The rising bell has always been a great stimulus to 
Ferry Hall, whpse modesty didn't lead them to " hide 
their light undei a bushel." But genius burns by reason 
of the same old subject, as is proven by the following: 

THE RISING BELL. 
I come from the haunts of light and day, 

I sound a doleful call, 
And sing the notes of a brazen lay, 

To stagger down a hall. 

By thirty doors I hurry down, 

Or slip between the cracks, 
By many girls who've come to town 

To get some dry old facts. 

With many a curse my walks I fret, 

O'er many a step and stair 
But never a soul have I ever met, 

To draw within my snare. 

I chatter, chatter as I go, 

From sleep the bonds to sever, 
For girls may come and girls may go, 

But I go on forever. 

But I am only the rising bell, 

Dreaded by young and old, 
And "get up" is the word I tell, 

"Get out" and dress in the cold. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

In behalf of the Academy students we thank the 
faculty for our last Saturday's holiday. They are in 
line with the best educators all about the country, who 
are not only giving students chances to attend the Fair, 
but are making efforts that they do go and see all the 
good the world contains. 

For some reason the reading-rooms in East Dormi- 
tory have not been supplied with reading matter as they 
should be. The daily paper arrives late very often, and 
too often is "appropriated" hy some one, while of other 
papers it is difficult to find. A speedy remedy is hoped 
for. 

All of the Academy students are heartily in favor 
of another "Forester" this year, and their support can 
be relied upon. 

ACADEMY LACONICS. 
Mr. F. C. Schultz, ex '93, is at Olivet College, 
Michigan, this year. 

" In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns 
to thoughts of love." But Hewitt can't wait until 
spring. 

Lamberton has been compelled to quit study (?) 
because of his eyes. 

The library room in Reid Hall is now open every 
day. 

Prof. Burnap this year leads an especially large 
class of twenty-eight members through the realms of 
Ancient History, in his fascinating way. The spirit of 
the class is notably earnest, and* the recitations interest- 
ing. 

They say that a voung lady from Sterling, 111., is 
visiting at the World's Fair. They say, furthermore, 
that Prof. W.'s commutation ticket is being used up 
rapidly. Who'll figure out this mathematical problem? 

On Saturday, the 21st of this month, Mr. Charles 
Gates of the Academy sails from New York on the 
steamer Etruria for Europe. He will spend the greater 
part of his time, between now and the 1st of January, 
in England and Germany. Mr. Gates expects to be 
with-us again by the first of the year if nothing happens. 
Wishes for a pleasant voyage follow him. 

Last week Ireland suffered a slight contusion of the 
brain from a blow received in a football game. There 
were no immediate effects, but later in the day his 
wound commenced to pain him, which made Ireland — 
not Rome — howl about a miscellaneous collection of 
football games he had in mind. This scared the oc- 
cupants of the floor, who thought Ireland needed Home 
Rule — but they were mistaken. He was truly delirious. 
His quick recovery was pleasant to us all. 

N. W. Flint, '93, visited in Lake Forest last Friday. 
He is playing guard on the football teams of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago and also the Chicago Athletic Club. 



ALUMNI. 

Mrs. Lindon W. Bates, of 'So, was prominent in the 
congresses in connection with the World's Fair, as a 
member of the Authors' Program and Press Program 
Committees. She gave a paper before the Representa- 
tive Women's Congress on "Organization in its Influ- 
ence Upon Literary Culture." In the Congress of 
Federated Clubs she, as chairman, read a short paper 
on their exhibit. Sept. 22d, she gave at the Woman's 
Building at the Fair a paper on "The General Feder- 
ation of Clubs," literary and artistic, over three hundred 
of which are now incorporated. Mrs. Bates also read 
to the Authors' Congress Hamilton W. Mabie's paper 
on "Literary Criticism," and at the Congress of Re- 
ligions, Prof. Louis W. Block's Ode "The Friendship 
of the Faiths," written for the Congress. The Journa- 
list for Sept. 2d had a portrait of Mrs. Bates with a 
most appreciative sketch of her life work. Her latest 
productions are two poems in "Belford's Magazine" for 
March and May; a serial begun in the June number of 
the same magazine, entitled "A Frontier Fiction," and 
an illustrated stoiy now running in "The Californian," 
entitled "Resurrection on the Umpqua." 

The announcement of the death of Mrs. M. M. 
Bergen will awaken a response in the heart of many an 
alumnus. First at Mitchell Hall and then at Academia, 
Mrs. Bergen was a kind mother to many a newly 
arrived student, and made lasting friendships. Her death, 
as the result of a fall, occurred the seventh of this month 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Nora Bergen Mc- 
Farlane. Appropriately, it was borne to Rose Hill by 
L. F. U. boys — Boggs, Becker, Linnell, Robe, and 
Edgar and Aleck Wilson. Her memory will be cherish- 
ed by many now scattered abroad in the land. 

At Baltimore, on the 26th of last month, was born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Bergen ('So and 'S3) a son. 
Mrs. Bergen writes that the new comer will probably 
borrow his father's name. May he also borrow his 
whole personality and add his mother's. 

Immediately after the death of his wife last summer 
Rev. G. D. Heuver, of Milwaukee ('S7), went abroad 
and has just returned. Leaving on the 2Sth of June, he 
spent five days in India, and then two months in his old 
home, Holland. His interest in social questions led him 
to disguise himself as a laboring man in London and 
Amsterdam, where he made a special study of the 
working classes. He has given the result of his obser- 
vations to the press in letters to the Cincinnati Herald 
and Presivter and to the Evoiing Wisconsin of Mil- 
waukee. He comes back ready to devote himself more 
earnestly than ever to the work of uplifting humanity. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH > 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI £ SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

•f DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH STREET. CHICAGO, ILL, U.S.A. 

* & & $ $ 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 

t 

THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsotete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large bodv of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work bv 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooky's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while 3'ear by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its templing 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiiing an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are manv things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or proprietv, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
mav nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while i snoring the p. inciph s of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and uhere much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS $9 50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 1 14 Monroe St., Chicago. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 



Practical 



PLUMBER * GAS FITTER, 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRcstauraut an& 

Choice Confectionery 

ice cream and salads of all kinds 

made to order __^ 

choice Confectionery a specialty. 

OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
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COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS, 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
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OFFICE NEAR THE 
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CIGARS, 
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AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
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Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

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BLANKETS, ETC. 

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CANDY 

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a sample retail box by express, 
of the best candies in America, 
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paid east of Denver. Refers to 
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ADDRESS. 

CFGUNTHER 

CONFECTOINER- 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



A.H. Abbott &Co. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN. LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, CHICAGO 

7Q DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



R u s h 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the . 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President, 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 
. Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocolosrv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M.D..PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 

Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROVVER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J* & CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
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You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
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OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
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revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - S5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



October 31, 1893. 
} 1 < 



No. 5 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co educational 

AT LALE FOREST, ILL. 



AS FOLLOWS: 

4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO, ILL. 
offers four years of work and tits for entrance into all the 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 
leading colleges. 

PERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides except v onal facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (1) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French. 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Bibical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address, 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake^Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Chicago's Leading Religions Weekly, 

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Reading 

For Stile at JSewstands. 




w. j. Root, 

♦ ♦ ♦ Photographer, 



HIGH ART 



Kimball Hall, 243 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

Typewriting and 
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You can secure the best results. 
You can obtain more work for your money. You can 
obtain more Manifold Copies, and you will always be 
pleased by bringing your manuscript copy to me. 

A. B. BURDICK, 

College. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Purchase 11 ° 

Books, 

Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



BRUBAKER 

Waukegan, III. 

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NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
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D. R. COOVER. 

[photographer, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 

JOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 




TRotice to Hbvertisers. 

If for any reason you are not satisfied with 
the shape, size or position of your ad., please address 

C. B. Moore, advertising agent, Lake Forest, 
do not let any little grievance like above named, run along 
indetinately and make it a cause for getting out of your 
contract. All that is possible will be done to correct any 
errors. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1893 



No. 5 



JOTHAM TRIES CANVASSING. 



MIRANDA JONES WILL XOT BUY HIS BOOK OR SYMPATHIZE. 



The world does not pay enough heed to the exam- 
ples of her eminent men. So thought I as I pondered 
over the fact that Daniel Webster paid for one term at 
Dartmouth by canvassing, that Napoleon Bonaparte 
won his first victories as agent for the " History of the 
Revolution," and that Tames G. Blaine sold the story of 
that remai kable man, whom he somewhat resembled, 
Henry Clay, " The mill boy of the slashes." Imme- 
diately I was seized with an intense desire to emulate 
them, in this respect at least. Having always lived in 
the East I was also eager to see the teeming prairies of 
the West. The reader will therefore not be surprised 
at my next move. 

It happened that I had a third cousin on my 
father's side living in Hangamon County, S. D., so I 
determined to write and find out whether nay relation- 
ship would prove agreeable to him. It read as fol- 
lows: 
Mr. Hezekiah Hornby: 

My Dear Cousin — As vacation is fast approaching, 
when I shall have some leisure time, I wish to know 
the prospect for a book agent in your vicinity. I have 
a very practical work, especially suited to farmers, and 
should like to canvass your district, making your place 
my headquarters if convenient. Anxiously awaiting 
your response, I am, 

Your cousin, 

JOTHAM. 

In the course of a month the following inviting 
reply reached me: 
Jotham: . 

Sir — Though our fathers were related on the other 
side of the flood, yet, jndging from the tone of your 
letter, my wife Sophrony and I will welcome von to 
our humble home. No peddler has heen in our neigh- 
borhood for five years. The last one got lost in the 
Bad Lands. Success will depend on yourself. 

Truly, Hezekiah Hornby. 

It is needless to say that my courage dropped con- 
siderably on receipt of the above, but thinking it might 
be only an effort to test my grit, I made up my mind to 
go at all hazards and perish if I must like my pre- 
decessor of five years previous. My publishers made 
me liberal terms so I started for Hangamon County 
earlv in June. 

My cousin Hezekiah was situated very near the 
centre of the county and hence I was the better satis- 
fied. Everything appeared so strange to my eastern 
eyes, however, that I spent several days with my rela- 
tives before venturing to attempt canvassing. 

Monday morning as the sun rose beaming on the 
breakfast table, I thought it just the moment to arouse 
my courage with a great resolution, so I said to Heze- 
kiah, " I shall make a start this morning. Can you 
give me some directions? " " Well," says he, " I think 
you would do best in the 'Wild Rose' neighborhood. 
That is ten miles from here and you can stop with Mr. 
Spicklemier. He will buy your book if it is any 
account." 



The day grew hot as I trudged off with my pack. 
The ten miles apparently lengthened to twenty before 
I at last reached Mr. Spicklemier's sod house. He had 
gone to town and would not be back till evening, yet 
Mrs. Spicklemier, a little woman with sharp gray eyes, 
took pity on me and gave me something to eat. I tried 
to repay her by showing up my book, " Ten Times 
Around the World," but she said she had never cared 
to go around the world even once and she was sure no 
one could live long enough to go ten times around. 
Believing my fate hung in the balance on her decision, 
I grew eloquent. I quoted whole passages. I urged 
her duty to her baby in the cradle. I pleaded the lib- 
erality of the Western people. I was sure her husband 
had only to hear the title to subscribe. Finally I made 
the offer to board it out and showed her how little it 
would really cost her. At last overcome by my en- 
treaties she said if it would be so great a favor to me 
she would take it for my sake. I expostulated at this 
and told her to take it for the book's sake and she 
would never regret it. After some hesitation she did 
so and I stepped out of the door as proud as Alexander 
after he had won the victory over Bucephalus. 

My first battle was won, but here is Mrs. Spindler. 
She will not take it without the consent of her husband. 
He says they have " Once Around the World " and 
that is enough. And here is Mr. Pinkerman. He has 
ten children, all living in the two rooms of a sod house. 
He says he will take it if he has the money when I de- 
liver, so I put him down as conditional. 

Here at last is Miranda Jones, an old maid living in a 
neat little "shanty " on her homestead. Now, thought 
■ I, the opportunity of a lifetime to sell a book " straight." 
With some difficulty I gained her attention. Then I 
show her all the pictures, explaining each carefully to 
make sure work. After that I show her the names of 
Mrs. Spicklemier and Mr. Pinkerman, and find out that 
Mr. Pinkerman has been owing her money for five 
years, while Mrs. Spicklemier borrowed two dozen 
eggs last summer and never returned them. Failing to 
influence her in that way I plead the intrinsic value of 
the paper, the beauty of the print, the accuracy of the 
drawings and the handsome binding. None of these 
move her, but her skin fits only closer to her high cheek 
bones. Then I speak of the influence of a good book, 
how whole generations are blest by such heritages; but 
she does not heed me. My countenance begins to fall. 
I try to draw out her sympathy ; but not a trace of pity 
can I see. She will not buy and it is needless to say 

more. 

* # * * 

A week has fled and on Saturday evening I am sit- 
ting at the table with Hezekiah aud Sophrony Hornby. 
Only ten subscribers are on my list. Two of them are 
conditional and the profits on three others have gone 
for board. My feet are sore, my back is lame, my neck 
is burned and my accents are weak. Hezekiah and 
Sophrony silently pity me. I go to bed saying little. 
In the morning, as the Sunday school is six miles away, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



I stay at home with Jim, the hired man. Without gain- 
ing open sympathy from any one I crave all the more 
for it and so sit down and write. 
Dearest Rosalie: 

What shall I say first? How I long to see you and 
tell you of my bitter experiences! How I desire your 
healing sympathy which steals away the sharpnesses of 
my life and buries them in the grave of forgetfulness. 
Willingly would I give you all my earnings this past 
week for one touch of your soothing hand. Once I was 
los- in the Bad Lands and wandered about wildly cry- 
ing for help. Was finally rescued by a stray cowboy 
when half starved. Once I slept out-doors by a hay 
stack and was soaked with rain. Three nights I slept 
in houses where multitudes of the minor creations kept 
me company! (Forgive me if it shocks your modest 
nature). Twice I went without any dinner and have 
no appetite. I have lost a hundred battles, Miranda 
Jones among' them, and to-day, weary and footsore, I 
write to you appealing for sympathy and remembrance 
in every orison you utter. ■ 

From your forlorn, yet most affectionate, 

JOTHAM. 

My mind felt easier. A great load had dropped 
from my shoulders. She would sympathize I knew. 
Monday morning I went to work again with a new 
spirit and thought I met many Mirandas, and pert little 
Irish girls telling me how pretty I was, and rugged 
Germans asking " vash is das?" and shrewd old 
farmers quibbling an hour over twenty-five cents, yet 
in spite of all reverses a neat little sum carried me back 
East in the fall with a rich fund of experience. 

Jotham. 



ATHLETICS. 

Athletics bid fair to come out well financially this 
year. The foot-ball team will probably more than pay 
its expenses, so that the money subscribed can be used 
for base ball and track athletics. This success is due 
partly to a fortunate combination of circumstances, but 
is more largely the result of good management. 

During the past week a good deal of talk has been in- 
dulged in concerning the changes on the team, and the 
Captain has been severely criticised by some. This 
state of things should not go on, as nothing is more 
discouraging to a captain than to be accused of unfair- 
ness. The Captain has been here for several years, and 
has always borne the name of absolute faithless. The 
changes on the team, while they may have weakened 
it in some ways, were made at the suggestion of the 
coach, and have undoubtedly strengthened the team as 
a whole. It is impossible for a team to be selected at 
the outset of the season, and if changes are found 
necessary the captain should not be blamed. 

The Beloit game has been postponed from next 
Saturday to a later date. There will probably be a 
game on that day with the Ills. Cycling Club eleven, 
and on Tuesday, Nov. 7th with the First National 
Bank Clerks, both on the home grounds. Every one 
should turn out to see these games, but all rudeness and 
ungentlemanly actions should be laid aside, and the 
visiting teams given a fair show. At Madison our 
team was hooted after the game, while during the play- 
ing even a good play called forth nothing but derision. 
Of course this was the work of a few, but if the 
sentiment of the crowd is against such behavior they 
can easily be hushed up. 



A TIE GAME. 

touchdowns: lake forest, 3; NORTHWESTERN, 2. 

Over eleven hundred people, the largest crowd that 
ever assembled in Evanston to witness a football con- 
test, gathered in the new athletic grounds on Friday 
afternoon to watch the game between the teams of 
Northwestean and Lake Forest. It was "University 
Da}," and Northwestern city contingent were present. 
Lake Forest also had a large delegation on the field. 
The game was an exciting one, and was hotly fought 
from start to finish. Tin horns and college yells were 
very much in evidence, as a consequence. Lake Forest 
clearly outplayed her opponents, but was weak in goal- 
kicking. Had it not been for this fact our score would 
have been six points greater than it was. 

Game was called at 3.40, and the teams lined up as 
follows: — 

LAKE FOREST. NORTHWESTERN. 

Rice right end Witwer 

Rheingans " tackle Parsons 

H. Thorn " guard Scott 

Hunt center Pierce 

McGaughey left guard Aylesworth 

Woolsey " tackle Van Doozer 

Adams " end Parkes 

Hayner, capt quarter back Griffith, capt. 

D.Jackson, left half Williams 

Lee right half Jewett 

Williams full back Smith 

Lake Forest won the toss and chose the ball. The 
game was opened with the flying wedge, by which 
L. F. made 2S yards. Then began a series of short 
rushes by Lee, Williams and Jackson. Williams was 
pushed across the line, scoring the first touchdown for 
L. F. within about five minutes of play. The ball was 
punted out, but was fumbled. Score — L. F. 4, N. W. o. 

Northwestern took the ball, and inside of ten 
seconds made a touchdown from a wedge play. The 
trick was beautifully worked. Jewett was sent.around 
the end on a feint, while Van Doozer eame out of the 
point of the wedge with the ball, and scored a touch- 
down. Jewett kicked goal. Score — N. W. 6, L. F. 4. 
L. F. again tried the flying wedge and gained 20 yds. 
Lee then made a gain of 10 yds. N. W. braced up at 
this point and got the ball on four-downs. L. F. soon 
secured the ball on off-side play, and by some quick 
playing forced Williams across the line for the second 
touchdown. Williams punted out and Thorn tried for 
goal but failed. Score— L. F. S, N. W. 6. 

Northwestern mide 15 yds. on the opening play. 
Runs by Van Doozer forced the ball down the field. 
Some elegant tackling by Adams at this stage com- 
pelled N. W. to lose the ball. L. F. tried the criss- 
cross, and Jackson, aided by the splendid interference 
of Adams, made a run of 60 yds., scoring the third 
touchdown for L. F. Williams failed to kick an easy 
goal. Score — L. F. 12, N. W. 6. 



I' HE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

NOTES OF THE GAME. 



Northwestern failed to gain sufficiently on four 
downs, so Jewett made a long punt. Williams caught 
the ball and made a most brilliant run, going fully 70 
yards, splendidly guarded by I,ee. He was tackled by 
Jewett within 15 yds. of North western's goal line. The 
ball was lost on four downs, and Jewett made a fine ive than the nondescript "U-Northwestcrn." 
run to the center of the field, where it was when the 
first half ended. 



Our interference was the best we have had this 
season. 

Our Lake Forest yells proved to be far more effect- 



In the first half Lake Forest had things their own 
way almost entirely. Northwestern's line was found 
to be decidedly weak, so to avoid sure defeat Capt. 
Griffith put on Culver of the Chicago Athletics and 
Sheppard. Lake Forest protested, but to no avail. 



If the game proved anything, it was the wisdom of 
the captain in making the late changes in our line. 

Captain Hayner was evidently in the right place as 
quarter, but he still feels a little strange in his new 
position. 

Every man in the team played a strong game, but 
The new men filled Northwestern full of "ginger," j ohn Lee deserves especial commendation, as this was 
and they played for the second half with fresh life. his first regular game. H worked like a Yale veteran. 

Evanston had the ban when play was resumed, and Mn J' Z " ( in ascending scale from command to en- 
gained 10 yards on the wedge. Van Doozer, Williams treat y) : "Get back, gentlemen! Back of the line, 
and Culver rushed the ball up the field and across the P lease! Please ? et back! ° h! wont - vou P lease kee P 
line, Van Doozer making the touchdown. Jewett t> acti • 

kicked goal. Score — L. F. 12, N. W. 12. citit^ l • ^ , 1 

to beveral Lake r orest professors were interested 

L. F. made 12 yds. on the opening play, but N. W. s P ectat °'-% among them Prof. Eager, who yelled him- 

got the ball on four downs. Van Doozer made several self hoarse. Dr. Seeley intended to go, but missed the 

gains, and a foul tackle by Hayner gave N. W. tlaln - 

25 yards more. Several more gains were made before It takes a game to make Williams blue as well as 

L. F. got the ball. Two good runs by Jackson car- to give him real delight. In the "gym" before the 

ried it quickly toward N. W. goal. The call of time game he was as blue as indigo. In the game he played at 



ended the game, leaving the score 1: 



Referee, Burbank of Minnesota. 
Umpire, Semple of Princeton. 



The following is the tabulated score, approximately 
correct - 





No. of 
Runs 


Yards 
Gained. 


Yards 
Lost. 


Tackles. 


Touch- 
downs. 


Rice, r. e. 


O 


O 


O 


4 


O 


Rheingans, r. t. 


O 


O 


O 





O 


H. Thorn, r. g. 


O 


O 


O 


-> 


O 


Hunt, c. 


O 


O 


O 





O 


McGaughey, 1. g. 


2 


4 


3 


1 


O 


Woolsey, 1. t. 


2 


■5 





S 


O 


Adams, 1. e. 


1 


2 





9 


O 


Hayner, q. b. 


O 








6 


O 


D. Jackson, r. h. 


s 


137 





2 


I 


Lee, 1. h. 


16 


7 S 





5 


O 


Williams, f. b. 


16 


'93 





5 


2' 



fever heat, always carrying the ball forward to the very 
last foot possible. His tackling was hard and effective. 

Prof. Dudley was at the game — that is, in the body. 
Prof. Burnap, so he says, approached him, and the fol- 
lowing is the dialogue that passed between the two. 

Prof. B.— "Fine play, wasn't it?" 

Prof. D. — "Yes, she is beautiful! Such eyes!" 

Prof. B. — "Oh! she lives down here, does she?" 



45 4 2 9 



44 



It was interesting to note the different emotions as 
plainly depicted on the faces of the crowd. For in- 
stance, when the "colored gentleman" punted to Wil- 
liams, the Evanston faces wore a look of delight at the 
length of the field over which the ball sailed. As it 
was dropping into his outstretched hands eager ex- 
pectation was the prevailing expression, and as it was 
laid safely away under one arm, and Williams started 
down field, the expression was one of surprised dis- 
pleasure. As he neared the side-line, it changed to ' 
amazement, but when thev saw him safely cutting 
across the field like a small sixed steam engine, the look 
3 of heart-broken dismay was pitable to behold. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE 


LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 


PUBLISHING COMPANY. 


Harry L. Bird, '94, - 


Editor 


W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 
A. O. Jackson, '96, ) 


Locals 


David Fales, Jr., '96, 


Town 


Prof. J. J. Halsey-, 


Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 


Exchanges 


Miss Lucia Clark, ( 
Miss Louise Conger, 1 


- Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, ) 
li. S. Cutler, ) 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 


Advertising 




TERMS. 


Per Year, in advance, $1.50 


Single Copies, 


.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University - Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

A UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. 

FOR three years past the Zeta Epsilon 
Society has maintained highly creditable 
Glee and Banjo Clubs. But this year the So- 
ciety offers to use its efforts in behalf of a 
University Glee Club, to be composed of mem- 
bers from both College societies and from the 
Academy. Similar organizations exist in all 
prominent colleges, and furnish considerable 
pleasure and benefit to their members, as well 
reflecting more or less glory to their respective 
institutions. If Lake Forest could boast a 
strong society club there is surely no valid 
reason why she might not have a good Univer- 
sity Club. There is plenty of available ma- 
terial for leaders, so that need not be an ob- 
jection; or perhaps the University might fur- 
nish a leader. Petty jealousies should certainly 
not be allowed to stand in the way of the 

general good. 

# * 
# 

THE students of the College are deeply 
grateful to the President and faculty for 
the generous course they pursued recently with 
regard to granting holidays. A considerable 



number took advantage of the leave of absence 
to attend the Northwestern game. Their 
presence, which made itself felt in various 
ways, inspired our players not a little, though it 
must be confessed that the red and black seemed 
at times like a very small wave in a purple sea. 
On Monday the students were given an oppor- 
tunity, much to their satisfaction, of witnessing 
the closing scenes of the "Vanishing White 
City." We have no hesitation in saying that 
in the long run nothing will be lost but much 
will be gained by this diversion from study. 



* * 

* 



THE late foot-ball game is so fully discussed 
elsewhere that further comment is hardly 
needed. Suffice to say that our boys acquitted 
themselves nobly. The defensive work was 
good, and the team, taken as a whole, showed 
up stronger than at Madison. Although the 
score was a tie, there is no doubt that Lake 
Forest outplayed the Northwestern eleven, 
and but for several unfortunate "flukes" would 
have been far in the lead at the close of the 
game. A word of warning to the 'Varsity men 
and the "scrub:" — don't slack up in the prac- 
tice. All day Monday was lost, nor was any- 
thing done on Saturday. The next Evanston 
game will be for "blood," and hence our stan- 
dard must not only be maintained but raised. 
Without lots of good hard practice the team- 
play will inevitably suffer. 



* * 
* 



"UNIVERSITY DAY." 

THOSE of the students and faculty who 
went to Evanston last Friday had an op- 
portunity to observe the workings of North- 
wesiern's so-called University Day. The idea 
consists in gathering together all the students 
from the professional and under-graduate de- 
partment for addresses and other exercises, 
concluding with a reception or banquet. A 
foot-ball game is also usually interspersed. 
The plan is to draw the scattered departments 
into closer touch with one another, thus creat- 
ing a "University spirit." The scheme is an 
admirable one, and might be adopted by Lake 
Forest with great advantage. This, or some 
similar device, would seem to be almost a 
necessity if we wish to have a University in 
fact as well as in name. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

The Freshmen have adopted eream and crimson as 
their class colors. Their yell is as follows: " Zipety za, 
zipety zeven, zipety zim za, '97." 

Owing to the Ferry Hall reception the Athenians 
postponed their program for one week. 

The students should be more careful in regaid to 
their treatment of the foot-ball men. After the Madi- 
son game the men were the guys of almost every fellow 
whom they met. Of course it is not to be expected that 
the men will be made pets of and sympathized with 
after a defeat, yet it should be remembered that when 
men have gotten out and worked hard for a couple of 
weeks before a game that they must feel defeat as 
keenly as it is possible for anyone to do. 

Judging from what we saw and heard while in 
Madison, it would be safe to say that in a few years 
their athletic facilities will be unsurpassed by any col- 
lege in the country. Their gymnasium now being 
built will rival that of Yale. The State legislature do- 
nated a tract of 60 acres in the centre of Madison for a 
field and gave $25,000 for putting it in order. 

T. A. McGaughey has received an offer from the 
Monmouth foot-ball management to coach its foot-ball 
team this fall. The offer is as yet unaccepted. It is to 
be sincerely hoped that Mr. McGaughey may be pre- 
vailed upon to decline with thanks, as he is an invalua- 
ble man in Lake Forest's line. 

W. N. McKee, '93, is in town. 

There has been considerable well-founded com- 
plaint, during the last few days, of the inadequacy of 
the steam supply in the College dormitory. The warmer 
the day, the more heat, and the colder the weather, 
the less heat, seems to be the engineer's rule. 

Mr. Leland T. Powers, the famous entertainer, has 
been secured for the evening of November 25th by the 
Z. E. society. He will impersonate Dickens' charac- 
ters as found in "David Copperfield." 

Mr. Frame, Princeton, '95, spent Friday and Satur- 
day with his cousin " Elder" Vance. 

Manager Ramsey, of Evanston, was the guest of 
A. P. Bourns last Friday evening. He kindly re- 
marked that Lake Forest girls compare very favorably 
with Evanston voung ladies. 

The Chicago Evening Journal is accurate in its 
Lake Forest athletic news. The students ought to have 
patriotism enough to ride out of town on a rail the 
next " City Press " man who attempts to misrepresent 
the state of our athletics. In this connection we are glad 
to note that the Chicago Times gave the fullest and 
best account of our last game. 



Mr. J. A. McGaughey received a visit early last 
week from Miss Nell Anderson, of Kansas, and two of 
his sisters who are attending Moody's Institute in Chi- 
cago early last week. 

Chas. Smith, '95, entertained his father last Wednes- 
day. 

N. H. Burdick was in town over Sunday. He still 
finds Lake Forest very attractive. 

Whoever was responsible for the Lake Forest cor- 
respondence in last Thursday's Tribnne showed either 
a willful ignorance of facts or a malicious desire to mis- 
represent Varsity foot-ball. There was, of course, not 
the slightest foundation for the insinuations made, 
while everyone easily recognized the contemptible 
spirit of the article. 

W. E. Shirra, a once famous Lake Forest athlete, 
was in town last Wednesday. He is now a " special" 
at the University of Chicago. 

W. E. Danforth and R. H. Crozier came out from 
Chicago to attend the reception on Friday evening. 

The Zeta Epsilon society held its regular meeting 
on Thursday evening last week. The program was as 
follows: Debate, "Resolved, That the proposed 
changes in onr Federal election laws would be beneficial 
to the country at large." Affirmative, E. A. Drake, 
A. Black; negative, A. Haberli, J.J. Price. Decision 
of judges, two for affirmative, one for negative. An 
interesting geneial debate was followed by a discus- 
sion, "Our attitude toward the stage," J. H. Rice; Im- 
pomptu, " Wauskesha Hygeia Water," F. S. Mellen. 



FERRY HALL. 

" We're alive, 
We're alive, 
We're the class of '95, 
Fer-ry Hall." 

Eighteen merry and very " noisy " Juniors, with 
Miss Conger as chaperons, enjoyed a hay ride to High- 
land Park last Tuesday evening. The presence of the 
full moon made up, in a slight degree, for the absence 
of the Seniors. Refreshments at Highland Park were 
a special feature. 

Miss Estelle Condon has gone to her home in 
Oswego, Kansas, to act as bridesmaid at the wedding of 
her sister. She expects to return next week. 

Miss Ann McWilliams, who was a student here 
last year and is now at Chicago University, came out 
for the reception Friday night and spent Sunday with 
us. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR, 



Miss Emma Lewis, of Chicago, was the guest of 
Miss Keener Friday and Saturday. 

An open meeting of rhetoricals " B " was held last 
Wednesday afternoon. The following programme 
was well carried out: 



Instrumental music, 

Essay, 

News of the week, 

Recitation, 

Instrumental music, 

Banjo music, 

Vocal music, 



Miss Latimer 

Miss Brown 

- Miss Marder 

Miss Bertha Durand 

Miss Mary Reid 

Misses Daniel and Byford 

Miss Utley 



We hope to be able to announce the names of the 
societies soon. 

A number of the young ladies went down to the 
Evanston-Lake Forest foot ball game and report an 
" exciting time." Why didn't Doctor Seeley go? 

Miss Lelia Daniel visited her sister, Miss Lucile, on 
Friday. 

Miss Ethelan Rogers, who attended Ferry Hall last 
year, spent Wednesday with us. 

The Misses Smith, of Thomdac, Mass., spent 
Wednesday with their cousin, Miss Phelps. 

Prof. Eager now makes Ferry Hall his head- 
quarters, only going in to Chicago twice a week. 

No callers were received on Saturday evening. 

FERRY HALL RECEPTION. 

The annual Ferry Hall reception took place on 
Friday evening, October 27th, and, as was expected, 
proved to be a most enjoyabie social event. Dr. and 
Mrs. Seeley and their assistants are adepts in the art of 
reception-giving. The guests were welcomed by Dr. 
and Mrs. Seeley, President Coulter, Miss Robinson 
and Mrs. Hester. The parlors presented a picture of 
moving grace and beauty, admirably set off by the taste- 
ful decorations. While not so crowded as on some past 
times, the rooms were still well filled with a joyous 
thiong. Varigated autumn leaves and vines were used 
in trimming, while pretty couches and divans were not 
far to seek. The library was a special feature, and 
skilled fingers had made it shine resplendent. Dr. and 
Mrs. Seeley also opened their private parlors. Re- 
freshments, as usual, were served in the dining room. 
The members of the company conversed and prome- 
naded until 10:30 o'clock, when they took their depar- 
ture (unwarmed by the rattling bell). 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Prof. Burnap truthfully says, "the intangible can- 
not be measured by inch or yard," in support of his 
statement that a student's knowledge cannot be gauged 
exactly by the mark whieh the teacher gives. From 
daily recitations and an examination is the students' 
standing for the term usually determined. Taking for 
granted that the term work aims to represent by its de- 
gree the student's knowledge, Prof. Burnap shows not 
only how likely is this mark to be erroneous, but how 
it is usually so. Take two students in a class-room. 
One may know little about the lesson, vet, enabled by 
a glib tongue, can, and does, make a smooth and satis- 
factory recitation. The other student may have thor- 
oughly digested the lesson, may have a comprehensive 
idea of it, yet does not make a good recitation, either 
because of his inability to smoothly express his ideas, or 
he is "rattled" by some small item slipping his memory 
or a visitor happens to be in the room. Like wise a 
student's ability cannot be summed up in a number, 
composed of units, each one of which is supposed to 
represent a certain small chunk of the same. Many 
times has the writer observed marvelous difference in the 
marks of two students, whose mental constitutions differ. 
The one with a mind especially susceptible to a few 
studies which are adapted to his tastes, receives, as he 
deserves, high marks, whereas the other with a mind able 
in all branches is versatile, but receives a term-mark 
far below his schoolfellow's. 

CHANGES IN THE CALENDER. 

The Academy Faculty has decided to shorten the 
Thanksgiving vacation, and to close school one-half 
week earlier at Christmas. 

At Thanksgiving school will be closed from Wed- 
nesday noon until Friday noon, and the Christmas 
vacation will begin Saturday, Oct. 16, at noon, continu- 
ing to Jan. 3 of next year. 

Most of the students will undoubtedly appreciate 
these changes, especially those living at a distance, who 
do not go home Thanksgiving. 

CAD. SECOND ELEVEN. 

The Academy second team and respective positions 
are : 

Randolph, center. 

Jailers, | , s 

Woolsey, \ & 

!!°B ue ' I tackles. 
Kline, J 

Chandler, ) ends _ 

Erskme, \ 

Porter, quarter. 

Warren, > half . back 
Smith, \ 
Wells, full-back. 
Subs., Newcomb, W.Jackson, Ireland. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Following are the games to be played, as scheduled 
by Capt. F. Smith: Hyde Park, Nov. nth; Wauke- 
gan and Lake View, 2nd team, no date. Other games 
are to follow. 

ACADEMY LACONICS. 

The "General" very gracefully, but with evident 
regret, gave up his stock of pipes recently to Dr. Pal- 
mer, whe in this way occasionally replenishes his outfit. 

Rev. Newcomb, of LaPorte, Indiana, visited his 
son, Phil last week. Mr. Addison Taylor was also 
visited by his father a few days ago. 

Clifford Hall has been kept from school for over a 
week by an attack of lumbago. He was overcome by 
a sudden attack of the disease while in the city, and had 
to be carried home bv several obliging citizens of Lake 
Forest. 

Grant Owen, a former Academy student, visited 
Will Rice last Thursday. 

We bespeak the desire of the many friends of Prof. 
Dudley, to have him settle definitely the date of the 
important event, and thus relieve us of suspense in the 
matter. 

There is a good deal of generous rivalry this year 
for first honor in the Beginning Greek class, so that 
though the class numbers few, they have, as their tea- 
cher expressed it, the "scholarly spirit." May their 
enthusiasm for their new study carry them safely over 
its difficulties. 

Prof. Dudley has been assassinating cats to such an 
extensive degree, that a certain esteemed individual with 
a tender sympathy for his ruthlessly slaughtered vic- 
tims, protested. The professor's war-cry was, "in the 
name of science," as he advanced to the combat. 
Affairs are still at a draw. 

We sincerely hope it is not the intention of the 
faculty to see how many students can be kept out of 
doors all night. Last Wednesday night the fact that 
the Durand Cottage door was locked at about twenty 
minutes to ten was brought forcibly to the notice of 
a certain gentleman whose indignation thereupon was 
certainly net uncalled for. 

Last Wednesday's program of the Gamma Sigma 
society was an excellent one throughout. The debate 
was particularly interesting. 

On the program of Tri Kappa's last literary meeting 
wos a debate on the question recently announced in 
these columns — "Should the Senate of the United States 
be Abolished." The result of an excellent debate was 
victory for the affirmative. The society is busily en- 
gaged in a complete revision of its constitution. 



Last Tuesday night the Y. M. C. A. prayer-meeting 
was devoted to a reorganization, whicn the officers 
termed a complete one. However, this reorganization 
consisted only in asking for the names of those desiring 
to become either associate or active members of the 
association. 

Every body in Durand Cottage, it seems, is having 
his eyes treated, and consequently, alas! cannot study as 
he would — if — . Fred Smith is among these patients, 
but it's worse with him. Every time he looks at a 
book he sees Double. 



SELF HELP. 

"Say, John, how do you do this Latin?" or, "sav, 
old man, help me out on this example, I have n't had 
time to look at this lesson, and I don't want to get 
caught again today," are common expressions in every 
school hall. Some boy has been too lazy to get his 
lesson or, has put it off so long there is no time left for 
it, and thinks the easiest way is to call on some other 
fellow, and thus save himself from mortification. 

This has two unfortunate results; First, it leads to 
indolent habits; and Second, to lack of a fine sense of 
honor. 

The "Can't do it" more often means "I am too lazy to 
do it," than what is intended — a lack of ability. If a pro- 
fessor should literally interpiet the "I can't get it" of 
all his pupils, he wou'd soon think he had a large 
number of ignoramuses. Should he say to the student 
what the "I can't" really justifies, — "You area hopeless 
case. You had better go to shoveling dirt," the student 
would feel grossly insulted. It is so easy to delude 
himself with seemingly plausible excuses, that he con- 
tinues doing it until he thinks his excuses good ones. 
We thus weaken ourselves. We get into the habit of 
depending upon others, and that essential to all true 
growth — self-reliance is abandoned. No student can 
afford to depend upon others. If his time at school is 
to mean anything of lasting value to him, it must be 
spent in the development of his own powers. 

Then, the second result. A student who gets 
another to read his lesson for him, or solve his problems, 
seldom thinks that when he recites he is putting him- 
self in a false position. But a moment's reflection will 
show him that he is getting credit for what he does 
not do. The recitation he is giving is no more his 
than the money the embezzler takes to pay his debts 
belongs to him. That is ours which we have gained 
by our own endeavor. This is not saying that students 
should never study together, nor that tkere is no place 
for mutual helpfulness. But one student should not 
depend upon another to do his work for him, or get 
out of a poor recitation through the aid of another, 
because he has neglected to prepare it. He better fail 
than be dishonest. 

Depending upon others gradually lowers one's own 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



self respect, whether he is conscious of it or not. It 
applies to the matter of pecuniary aid also. A young 
man gets some aid from the scholarship fund, as it is 
his privilege to do. As long as he puts forth his best 
energies, as it is his duty to do, he commands the 
respect of others and retains his respect for himself. 
If, however, he relaxes his own exertions and seeks 
other means of aid, demanding it almost as his right, 
and finding fault because it is not given him, or 
more is not done for him, he has lost that fine sense 
of honor which his better nature approves, and a lack 
of manly independence and conscious worthiness be- 
gins to show Itself in his bearing and in his speech. 
Evervone is glad to help those who help themselves, 
but a parasite is neither helpful nor noble. What I 
wish to urge upon every student because of its incal- 
culable value to him is self-help and self-reliance, which 
lead to manly independence. — Charles Alden Smith. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Prof. Bridgeman will occupy the Benedict house 
for the remainder of the school year. 

Mr. Fitzhugh has started a new dwelling on his 
land north of Mr. Moss's house. 

Mrs. David Fales has returned from a three week's 
visit in the East. 

Miss Julia Moss spent Sunday in Lake Forest. 

Mr. Watson and Mr. Fauntleroy were among the 
spectators at the football game at Evanston. 

Mr. Fauntleroy has nearly completed his stable, 
which has been building just south of Mr. Rainey's 
pasture. 

The cement sidewalk in front of Mr. Calvin Dur- 
and's place has been completed. Mr. H. C. Durand 
will continue the sidewalk to the north, and around his 
place to the ravine east of Mr. Hinckley's house. 

Mrs. Annie Atteridge has bought of L. H. W. 
Speidel enough land north of her property on the main 
street to make an even fifty feet. Her property is now 
occupied by Proctor's grocery store. It is Mrs. Atter- 
idge's intention to build a double brick store on the 
land sometime in the future. 

South of this land, between Proctor's store and the 
postoffice, a new postoffice building will be immediately 
erected. The new quarters of the postoffice will be on 
a twenty-five foot front, and will occupy a two-story 
frame building. 

Lake Forest will witness its first 'varsity football 
game this coming Saturday. On that afternoon the 
Lake Forest team will line up against Beloit, whom 
she defeated last year, or some other good team. 
The next game at Lake Forest will be on next 
Tuesday afternoon, when the National Bank Clerks 
will try their valor. These games are the first oppor- 
tunity Lake Foresters will have for seeing the fine 
work that the team have been doing, and, moreover, a 
large attendance from the town people will greatly 
encourage the players. Everyone should be present at 
the games. 



MORE EVIDENCES OF PROGRESS. 

THE HERBARIUM. 

In an early issue of The Stentor appeared a very 
brief statement concerning the Herbarium. Since this 
department is an established part of the University, it 
is fitting that a more detailed account should appear, 
showing the nature and significance of the work done. 

The domain of work concerned lies in that branch 
of botanical science known as Systematic Botany, whose 
ultimate aim is a natural and complete system of plant 
classification based upon true genetic characters. Sys- 
tematic Botany would thus embrace the entire plant 
kingdom; but in its commonly accepted sense, it has to do 
only with flowering plants, ferns, and their allies, leav-; 
ing to the histologist the vast realm of Cryptogamic 
Botany. 

With the cases crowded as they are now into very 
narrow quarters, the Hebarium does not impress the 
visitor with any correct idea of its "bigness." It is 
therefore with surprise that he learns of its 60,000 
specimens of flowering plants and ferns from every 
country and climate, or of its great value in the excel- 
lent representation from nearly every quarter of North 
America. Relatively it takes rank among the large 
herbaria of America, while as a private collection it is 
second to none on this side of the water. A marked 
feature is the large proportion of western JJora repre- 
sented — a direct consequence of years of study on the 
plants of those regions, culminating in Coulter's Rockv 
Mountain Botany ( 1 SS5 ), and his Manual of the Pterido- 
phytes and Phanerogams of Western Texas, only re- 
cently completed. 

Like other private collections, it has risen to dis- 
tinction along with its owner. First at Hanover, later 
at Wabash, then at Indiana University, receiving large 
additions from time to time as it moved, the Coulter 
Herbarium at last finds lodgment in Lake Forest, where 
every indication points to a period of greater growth 
and prosperity than ever. 

Dr. Coulter is now preparing his Monograph of 
North American Cactacea? for press — the result of 
nearly three yeors of critical study in that strange, diffi- 
cult group. Critical material constantly being sent in 
for identification requires much time and attention. 
Revision of other groups — just now the Amaranths and 
the Nettles — are being worked out, all of which are to 
contribute their share in future publications on the Flora 
of North America. — U. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH \>> 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
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dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
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the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

of DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH STREET. CHICAGO, ILL., USA 

.* * £ * *■ 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsolete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To the>e he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These fern significant sentences from Judge Cooley's work should be read by every law student: 

"And so it happens that while Year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acqni ing an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agretable introduction. 

•' Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or proprietv, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while i;noring the p inciph s of life which animated it. And it is noiiceable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have neve r been made, and where much of the rtcent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to Ameiica, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information aboir parliamentary legislation which in noway 



concerns us. 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS $9 50, PREPAID ON R'CEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



STT JOF^NHTS Presenting this ad. will be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

The Model Clothino- House, 



t 



Temperance Temple, Washington St., 



"The |V|odel" makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN, 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats fP Furnishing Goods. 

.And on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. "Verbum Sat Saptexti." 




Uhe Grak} press, 

iprinteis, ipublisbcrs, Besioners 

178=182 Monroe Street 

Cbtcaoo. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

A Complete Line of the 

Celebrated 

Victor Bicycles, 

Shaker Sweaters, 

Base Ball, 

Lawn Tenis, 

Photographic Supplies, Etc. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros., 
108 Madison Street, 



O 



icago. 



W. E. RUSTOIN. Agent. Lake Forest. 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 

Practical 

PLUMBER • GAS FITTER, 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRcstauiaut an& 

^~ Choice Gonfccticmeni, 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER — ^ 



choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT 



J. G. Cornish, 



DF.ALEK IN 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, « 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



ANU MANUFACTURER Ol 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OE . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. 111. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS, 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, ETC . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



jSJ ORMAN J. ROBERTS, 

DENTAL 
SURGEON 

WAUKEGAN, IL1 — 

Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

* * HARNESS, 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

Df AWErrc c REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE. 

BLANKETS, ETC. 

Waukegan, III. 



ROBERT MERCER, , 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
PIPES, AND 
STATIONERY. 
AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
AND DEALERS IN 

MEDICAL and ROOKS 
SCIENTIFIC *• L, V7V7I\0 

96 Washington Street, 
Chicago. 



QANDY 

CANDY 
CANDY 



Send $1.25, $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box b)* express, 
of the best candies in America. 
put up in Elegant Boxes and 
Strictly Pure. Suitable for 
presents. Express charges pre- 
paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all Chicago. Try it once. 
ADDRESS, 

C TGUNTHER 

CONFECTOINER- 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



A.H. Abbott &Co. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University... . 



faculty: 



■ DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 
Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President, 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

. WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M.D.,PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. II. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



& 



OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, CHICAGO. 

79 DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J" b CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS, 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

IN. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



November 7, 1893. 
> 1— V 



No. 6 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



AS FOLLOWS: 

1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. PUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co educational. 6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT LALE FOREST. ILL. AT CHICAGO, ILL. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and tits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French- 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Bibical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address, 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lakk'Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




MEN S FURNISHINGS 



MARK 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Chicago's Leading Religious Meekly. 

Good 

Sunday 

Reading 

For Sale at Aewstands. 




w. j. Root, 



HIGH ART 



Kimball Hall, 241 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

Typewriting and 
Manifolding. 

You can secure the best results. 
You can obtain more work for your money. You can 
obtain more Manifold Copies, and you will always be 
pleased by bringing your manuscript copy to me. 

A. B. BURDICK, 

College. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Purchase lor 
Books, 

Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



BRUBAKER 

€ Qrtisti© $Pfi©t®§ rapfier® 

Waukegan, 111. 

NEW LOCATION. NEW ROOMS. 

NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
126 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 

D. R. COOVER. 

(photographer, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 

pDMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 

IRotice to Hbvertisers. 

If for any reason you are not satisfied with 
the shape, size or position of your ad., please address 

C. B. Moore, advertising agent, Lake Forest, 
do not let any little grievance like above named, run along 
indefinately and make it a cause for getting out of your 
contract. All Hut is pjisi'oli sylll b; h 1: t j :r.:: ny 
errors. 




The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 189: 



No 6. 



ANOTHER VICTORY. 



liELOIT DEFEATED IN A LOOSE GAME. 



The Beloit team arrived in town Monday noon de- 
termined to take Lake Forest "into camp," and thus go 
home with at least one victory. The day was ideal for 
both players and spectators, and a fail-sized crowd wit- 
nessed the game. However, Beloit was disappointed 
in her worthy ambition, and this in spite of the fact that 
Lake Forest played a substitute full-back and a new 
man at guard, Lake Forest was found to win, but would 
have had more difficulty in doing so if Beloit had had 
a few more men like her captain, Atkinson. He made 
his men play a quick sharp game. At one time our 
score was 20 to 4, but by a little extra "ginger" Beloit 
worked up, so that the final score was 26-16. 
At 3:30 the team lined up as follows: 



LAKE FOREST. 




BELOIT. 


Rice 


right end 


Wheeler 


Rheingans 


" tackle 


Pitkins 


H. Thorn 


" guard 


Burge 


Hunt 


center 


Hinkley 


Rein hart 


left guard 


Dwight 


Woolsey 


" tackle 


Wood 


Adams 


" end 


Riggs 


Hayner, capt 


quarter back 


Wetzel 


Lee 


right half 


Fisher, Frizzelle 


D. H. Jackson, 


left half 


Keith 


Fales 


full back 


Atkinson, capt 



Referee — Xyce, of Princeton '91. 
Umpire — Raycroft, U. of Chicago. 

Beloit won the toss and took the ball, 10 yards was 
gained on the opening play. Rushes by Atkinson, 
Keith and Fisher, brought the ball to the L. F. 10 yd.- 
line. L. F. braced a little, but Atkinson finally carried 
the ball across the line, scoring Bcloit's first touchdown. 
No goal was kicked. Score 4-0 for Beloit. L. F. 
opened with a flying wedge, and Jackson carried the 
ball 30 yards. 

Good bucking by Fales and Lee, and runs by Wool- 
sey, quickly carried the ball down the field. Beloit 
could not stop L. F.'s rushes, and the ball was carried 
across the line by Lee. Xo goal. Score 4-4. 

Beloit made a short gain with the wedge, followed 
by runs of Atkinson and Riggs. 

L. F. got the ball on four downs and carried it down 
the field when it again went to Beloit. 

Beloit made several good gains. At this point Fisher 
was hurt and his plaee taken by Frizzelle. Woolsey 
shortly after this got the ball for L. F. by a sharp pla\ . 
It was forced down the field, and Jackson, after a run 



of 20 yards, made a touchdown. Fales kicked goal. 
Score 10-4 for Lake Forest. 

Beloit took the ball and carried it up the field till 
Lee got it on a fumble by Atkinson. This ended the 
first half. 

L. F. opened the second half with the flying wedge, 
making 12 yds. Fales punted and Atkinson returned. 
Fales again punted to Atkinson, who fumbled the ball, 
and Woolsey dropped on it. The ball was carried up 
the field and across the line by Woolsey. Xo goal. 
14-4 for Lake Forest. Beloit tried the wedge for a 
short gain, but L. F. got ball on four downs. Fales 
punted. Atkinson dropped the ball, and Rice, picking 
it up, made a touchdown. Fales kicked goal. Score 
20-4 for Lake Forest. Beloit took the ball, and aided 
by splendid interference by Atkinson, Keith made a 
touchdown. Atkinson kicked goal. L. F. carried the 
ball quickly up the field, and Jackson, after a run of 
25 yds., made the last touchdown for L. F. Fales 
kicked goal. 26^10 for Lake Forest. Beloit carried 
the ball into L. F. territory, where it was kept for 
some time, when Keith made a touchdown for Beloit, 
being literally carried across the line by Atkinson. 
This was the star play of the game. Goal was kicked. 
Score 26-16 for L. F. L. F. took the ball up the 
field, and had it within half a yard off Beloit's goal 
when time was called. 

NOTES OF THE GAME. 
Atkinson's all-around playing was a feature. He 
was literally the life of his team. 

The interference of the Beloits was often a beauti- 
ful sight. Lake Forest was rather weak in this respect 



ATHLETICS. 

Yale, Princeton and Wesleyan patched up an un- 
dergraduate rule against Pennsylvania at their recent 
meeting in Xew York. The rule is all right, but it 
can never be enforced. Pennsylvania still continues to 
play her old team and seems to want not so much the 
penant as a strong team. 

Lee, who is improving every day, is now a fixtuie 
at half-back. Reinhart, of the Academy team, is now 
playing at left guard in McGaughey's place. While he 
is a comparatively new man, still he is strong and 
quick, and if coached a little, ought to make a good 
guard. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



No matter where we have played this Fall, in every 
instance we found good level fields which had a cover- 
ing of black soil. In most cases they have been sur- 
rounded by close board fences. Why do the authorities 
not give us a good field, at least? As one of the town 
men told the boys, they endanger their life and limb in 
everv practice game. Not only is the ground hard 
clay, but it is full of sharp-edged pieces of flint, so that 
every little while some one gets the skin all taken of 
his hands or face. In some places ditches have been 
washed out by the rain so that a man is in danger of 
spraining his ankle every time he runs. 

In the last game at Evanston the team was sup- 
ported by a large sized delegation from Lake Forest. 
Let everybody turn out and go down next Saturday. 
Those who missed the train last time can take an 
earlier start this time. 

The Academy foot-ball team must have an awfully 
complicated system of signals judging from the amount 
of time which is spent in practicing on them. The 
Captain gets his men out on the field as a rule before 
the 'varsity gets out. His team then proceeds to prac- 
tice signals which they do all the time the 'varsity is 
practicing its signals. Then when asked to line up 
against the 'varsity the plea is, "We want to practice 
signals, can't you let us practice signals just a little bit 
every day?" Then the 'varsity has to go round and 
pick up a few men to form a line against it. This is 
no kind of practice for the 'varsity; they ought to have 
fifteen or more good men against them every night if 
they expect to do anything. 

There is now a systematic effort on foot to organize 
a good second eleven. Although rather late in the 
season, yet much good may be derived from the forma- 
tion of this team. E. E. Vance has been elected captain 
and will be pleased to see as many as possible come out 
for practice. Let every one put on a suit of some sort 
and play ball. 



ALUMNI. 

Rev. J. W. Millar, of 'S3, is pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church at Deer Lodge, Montana, and gives the 
Biblical Instruction to the classes in the College of 
Montana. 

The Lake Forest delegation at McCormick Seminary 
this year numbers nineteen, viz: J. L Boggs, E. M. 
Wilson, H. H. Davis, J. Sutton, E.'S." Chaffee, W. F. 
Love, M. McLeod, G. W. Wright, E. W. Irwin, N. H. 
Burdick, C. S. Davies, J. A. Linn, H. Marcotte, H. E. 
House, S. G. Tyndall, H. W.Jones, H. Killen, W. E. 
Price, J. A. Mitchell. 

Keyes Becker, of 'S9, is one of the editors of "The 
Rani's Horn" — "the only paper of the kind in the 
world" — an unsectarian religious weekly which has its 
headquarters in the Woman's Temple, Chicago. 

Rev. Selbv F. Vance, of 'S5, who went abroad in 
Tune with Mrs. Vance and Miss Jean Smith for two 
years of study in Germany, spent some months at 
Cassel and is now at the University of Tubingen. His 
line of study is New Testament criticism. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mrs. Bridgeman has returned from a visit in Orange, 
New Jersey. 

The Junior dancing school started last Wednesday 
afternoon. Mrs. Pevien, of Waukegan, will again take 
charge of the class. 

The University Club met for the first time last 
Friday evening at President Coulter's house. 

The Misses Wood gave a Hallowe'en party Tues- 
day evening, Oct. 31st. 

The Young People's Entertainment Society was 
entertained Thursday evening at the home of Miss 
Pratt. The Society will meet regularly throughout 
the winter for the purpose of amusement and social 
intercourse. 

The Northwestern Railroad has enlarged its Lake 
Forest engine-house to hold two engines. 

The bridge between the church and Mr. J. B. 
Durand's is being repaired. 

The liquor nuisance is as yet unabated. Several 
beer wagons have been seen in Lake Forest lately, or 
probably the same wagon has been seen several times, 
openly delivering spirits. 

Several day sago Mrs. Lake's house was entered and 
over forty dollars taken. Mis. Lake, who lives on 
the road to Lake Bluff, had been having her house cal- 
cimined, and the calciminers had left a ladder to the 
second story standing. The burglars probably gained 
entrance by means of this ladder. 

Monday night, Oct. 30th, Charles Bryant, of High- 
land Park was discovered robbing Blackler's meat mar- 
ket. Mr. Blackler had been missing small sums for 
several months previous. His cashier suspected Bryant, 
but as Mr. Blackler was unwilling to believe it, he 
engaged a Mooney & Boland detective to look into the 
matter. Monday night the detective and Russell Wells 
found Bryant in the store but failed to catch him. He, 
although shot in the leg, managed to catch a train just 
drawing out, and reached his home in Highland Park, 
where he was soon after found by the detective and 
Mr. Blackler. Bryant is well known and has been 
highly esteemed in Lake Forest. He became a partner 
of Blackler's after working for him several yeais, but 
last spring he established a market of his own in High- 
land Park. He was married but a few months ago. 
He confessed that he had robbed the safe and till twenty 
times taking each time from five to fifty dollars. Being 
acquainted with the combination of the safe and having 
a key of the till, his method was simple enough after 
he had swung himself through the transom of the front 
door. The whole affair is a surprise to all who knew 
Bryant. Such actions also show a very ungrateful atti- 
tude toward Mr. Blackler, who has helped Bryant in 
many ways. It has been said that Bryant will not be 
prosecuted. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



5 



THE BIOLOGICAL CLUB. 

The "Biological Club of Lake Foiest University" 
was organized Friday, Nov. 3, in Prof. Locy's labora- 
tory. The officers of the club are: President, Dr. 
Coulter; secretary, E. B. LTline. Beside a president 
and secretary there is a program committee, consisting 
of two students and a member of the faculty, to handle 
the meetings. The club will meet once in three weeks, 
on Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, in Prof. Locy's 
laboratory. 

Its charter members are: Misses Cotton, Phelps, 
Gilleland, McKee and Goodwin; Messrs. Coulter, 
Uline, Harper, Locv, Dudley, Coulter, Bray, Hayner, 
Black, Swezey and Thorn. 

Dr. Coulter outlined the work as follows: The 
object of a Biological club is, first, to create an atmos- 
phere of the subject, — to arouse in the students a lively 
interest in scientific research; secondly, to make stu- 
dents familiar with the current literature of Biology, 
and lastly, to give scientific students the very necessary 
practice in presenting the results of their investigation. 

All students having completed one year's course in 
either Botany or Zoology, and continuing the course, 
are eligible to membership. 

This club is expected to arouse much interest in 
scientific inquiry at Lake Forest. It is desired that 
every one interested will take hold and push it to 
success. 



to the new grand Steinway piano in the chapel on 
Hallowe'en was an act of purest vandalism that, I am 
sure, will meet with still greater disapproval on the part 
of the body of students of Lake Forest University. 
The trustees are constantly making great effort to fur- 
nish the schools with every appliance to assist the 
students in their work, and any destruction of property 
assigned to this purpose is therefore doubly to be de- 
plored and condemned. The city lamplighter told me 
that four-fifths of the expense to the city for repairing 
lamps is incurred in the limited part of the city which 
students most frequent. Lamps are smashed as a re- 
creation, and tax-payers must foot the bill, while citizens 
are obliged to find their way along the streets in dark- 
ness. Destruction of public property is a crime just as 
much as is the destruction of private property. It seems 
to me that the time has come when faculty and students 
should set their strong seal of disapproval upon these 
things. — L. Seeley. 



COMMUNICATION. 

VANDALISM. 
Isn't it time for the students of Lake Forest to con- 
sider what constitutes proper fun and what becomes 
vandalism? It is not my purpose to write an essa yon 
college morals, or to discuss at length the subject from 
an ethical standpoint; but I want to bring forward a 
few concrete examples, in the belief that the strong 
sentiment of the students here condemns wrong-doing 
as soon as it is seen. There is a great deal of badness 
in the world, but I believe that there is much more of 
goodness, and this holds among students as well as 
among other classes of people. Where so many young 
people are brought together it is quite natural that 
there should be more or less of mischief. When that 
mischief is innocent — when it does not go too far, when 
it is not demeaning either to those who practice it or to 
the victim, it is not objectionable; but when it becomes 
vicious, when it goes so far as to become a nuisance or 
a danger, when it offers insult to the feelings or bodily 
injury to the individual, when it destroys public or pri- 
vate property, then it is wrong and should be discount- 
enanced. Let us take a few examples. The destruc- 
tion of a window screen in the private room of a young 
lady at Ferry Hall would not have been thought of in 
any private home in Lake Forest, and was promptly 
resented on the part of the mass of students as soon as 
known, and proper amends insisted upon. The injury 



EXCHANGES. 

Wooster U T niversity has lately received legacies 
amounting to $50,000. 

The second number of the Inlander has come to us, 
and is if possible better than the first. 

The Rockford Collegian contains Washington 
Irving's Ichabod Crane in dramatized form. 

The University of Minnesota beat Ann Arbor in a 
wretchedly poor game, 34-20. They followed this up 
by beating Evanston 1S-0. 

Nothing is so essential to the success of college 
athletics as the support of the press. This has been 
proven beyond a doubt in the East and is rapidly being 
demonstrated in the South. — Ex. 

The library is the armory of human thought, and 
contains both trophies of the past and the weapons for 
future conquest. — Round Table. 

The Voice, a well edited monthly, comes to us 
from the West Division High School of Chicago. 

The editor sat in his sanctum 

Letting his lessons rip, 
Racking his brain for an item, 

And stealing all he could clip. 

The editor sat in his class room 

As if getting over a drunk, 
His phiz was clouded with awful gloom, 

For he had made a total flunk. 

The editor returned to his sanctum, 

And hit himself in the eye, 
He swore he'd enough of this business; 

He would quit this paper or die. 

— Silver and Gold. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 

A. O. Jackson, '96, 1 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 
Miss Lucia Clark, 
Miss Louise Conger, 
S E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, ) 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Locals 

Town 

Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$1.50 

.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Coinrnmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 



will see a second " Forester." This is as it 
should be. At the last meeting of The Sten- 
tor editorial board, the members were nearly 
unanimous in their approval of such a publica- 
tion, and this opinion seems to be shared by 
the students at large. We wish to call the 
attention of the committee to the fact that the 
Annual should appear not later than the mid- 
dle of the second term, hence there is great 
necessity for dispatch. Everyone is very busy 
(or thinks he is, ) but there is plenty of unoccu- 
pied talent which can be devoted to this work, 
while even a really bus)- man can always do 
still more. We can readily surpass our former 
effort if all take hold in the right spirit. Let 
the matter be pushed. 



* * 
* 



ENGLISH STUDY. 

ARVARD, always in the forefront in mat- 
ters educational is now moving in the di- 



H 



W 



E are glad to note that the preliminary section of greater attention to the study of 



steps are being taken towards forming 
a University Glee Club. The plan outlined in 
the last number of The Stentor seems to 
meet with genral favor. We hope to see the 
club organized and practicing before Thanks- 
giving. 



# * 

* 



IT has been suggested that we enter a plea in 
behalf of the many hand-ball players for a 
suitable place to play that "fiendish" game. 
There is a court alongside the College dormi- 
tory, but changes in the weather will soon 
make it unavailable. In the gymnasium there 
isthe dark, cooped-up end of the ball cage with 
a rough and uneven floor. We would urge 
that a portable wall be provided, so as to make 
one or two hand-ball courts on the main floor 
of the gymnasium. The game is one of the 
best of indoor exercises, and better facilities 
should be furnished for it. 



* * 
# 



THE two College societies have appointed a 
joint committee to consider the " Annual" 
project, so it is highly probable that this year 



English. Thorough and careful training is 
offered, with a view to attaining, first, a scien- 
tific knowledge of English language and litera- 
ture; second, a general acquaintance with Eng- 
lish literature; third, proficiency in English 
composition. Students are encouraged to 
form opinions of their own about what they 
read, and to express opinions with intelligence, 
precision, and brevity. Harvard has increased 
the number of courses in English about fifty 
per cent, over last year, and there is scarcely a 
doubt that all other colleges will follow in her 
footsteps. This advance in English study is 
made mostly at the expense of the ancient 
languages — chiefly Greek. Many educators 
express the idea that Greek will ultimately 
lose its present prominent position as a required 
study, and become of secondary importance. 
Such at least seems to be the modern tendency. 
Be that as it may, all students will agree that 
English (and American) literature should 
receive more attention from college men than 
has usually been given to the subject in the 
past. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

The gymnasium is now open on Wednesday and 
Saturday evenings. 

Mr. A. Black is the latest addition to the working- 
force of Herbarium. 

Essays, orations and thesises, are now the bane of 
life for a great many students. 

C. G. Smith was last week called away from school 
by the death of his grandmother. 

W. E. Danforth, G. W. Wright and H. Marcotte, 
attended the Hallowe'en party at Ferry Hall. 

Attention is called to a communication from Dr. 
Seeley on "Vandalism," which appears in this issue. 

Prof. G. W. Schmidt is now located in the Sharp- 
neck house where the "19th Century Club" boarded 
last year. 

John Rice received a visit from his brother E. O. 
Rice, of Wis. U. '92. His brother George has entered 
the class of '97. 

Judging from the programs posted it would appear 
that the new men are rapidly getting into their harness 
in the societies. 

There is now a chance to get magazines and other 
periodicals very cheaply from those having the leading 
room in charge . 

The College fellows appreciated very highly the 
serenades given by the young ladies last Thursday and 
Friday evenings. 

About ten members of the foot-ball team accompa- 
nied Capt. Hayner to Evanston, on Saturday to get 
pointers on the Beloit team. 

Mr. F. C. Rogers, of Waukegan, has been obliged 
owing to poor health to quit school. This is the second 
man '96 has lost this year. 

Mr. Leland T. Powers will give his peerless im- 
personation of Dickens' "David Copperfield" in the Art 
Building, on Saturday evening, Nov. 25. 

J. A. McGaughey, on Tuesday, left for Monmouth 
College to take charge of the foot-ball team in that 
school. He will be much missed in the team here and 
his place is hard to fill. 

Quite a number of the boys took advantage of the 
holiday on closing day to attend the Minnesota-North- 
western game. The fellows think Minnesota will meet 
her Waterloo when she pla\ s Madison. 

Dr. Coulter was at Marion, Indiana, last week, in 
attendance on the State convention of Young Men's 
Christian Association, of which he was president and 
at which convention he delivered an address. 

Through the Wooster Voice we learn that B. R. 
McIIatton (a former editor of this paper) has entered 
the Junior class of Wooster College and that his good 
record as a foot-ball player has preceded him. 

Miss Abigail Davies gave one of her enjoyable 
candy-pulls last Thursday evening in honor of her 
friend Miss Graham, of Greenville, Mich. The parti- 
cipants declare the evening a success — "lots of fun." 

A dark night — a "Sen" serenade of the College — a 
wild rush to the window — obstacle a clean pane 
of glass — then crash and all that's left is a hole in 



the sash. The foot-ball captain is now looking for a 
glazier. 

Fry thought he had a high-grade watch dog, but 
since Hallowe'en he has changed his opinion. He says 
the dog never barked once during the night, while there 
was disturbance enough to have kept him barking till 
morning. 

The parties who took the hymn books from the 
College chapel and who damaged the piano at Ferry 
Hall should make a satisfactory settlement for their 
malicious mischief. If thev are honorable men they 
will do so promptly. 

There does not seem to be so much enthusiasm in 
regard to the chess club as last vear. Chess is a game 
which is receiving much attention in the higher col- 
leges to-day and it is to be hoped a club will be started 
here as soon as the foot-ball season closes. 

Harry McClenahan spent- a few days in town dur- 
ing the last of the week. It was expected he would be 
back with the Sophomore class as soon as the Fair was 
over. He says, however, he will not be able to come 
back to school till after the Christmas holidays. 

The Dial of November 1st contains a review by 
Prof. Halsey of the last addition to the "American 
Statesmen" series — the life of Abraham Lincoln by 
John T. Morse, Jr. This work Prof. Halsey considers 
superior to the more pretentious "lives" which have 
preceded it. 

About a week ago a notice was posted that a letter 
had been received for the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 
We do not often get letters of such a kind here, and it 
created quite a little curiosity among the fellows. The 
question was several times asked whether it was possi- 
ble that a " frat " existed her " sub rosa." 

It is said that the Freshmen have been breaking 
into the rooms of some of the upper class-men. For a 
Freshmen to enter a Sophomore's room v\ hile he is out is 
not unprecedented. But it is a law established bv age 
and custom that the rooms of the upper class-men 
should be left alone by the lower c'ass-men. 

Died — At North Hall, Thursday, November 2, 
Solidge Ometry, '97, aged one month and sixteen days. 
Funeral services November 4 at nine o'clock in the 
evening. He was much beloved by those who knew 
him best and for the others he still lives. 

How we miss those little footlets 
Tinkling on the tufted stair, etc., affetuoso. 

The initial meeting of the University Club was held 
at the house of Dr. Coulter last Friday evening. In- 
strumental music by Misses Ripley and Sizer, and a 
paper by Prof. Halsey, supplemented by a spirited dis- 
cussion, constituted the program. Social converse with 
refreshments followed, and the club adjourned to meet 
again at Prof. Thomas's. 

At present the faculty arebusily engaged in the revi- 
sion of the requirements for admission. The revision does 
not mean any change in the standard of admission, but it 
does mean a broader, more "cosmopolitan" standard, so 
that just as there is a wider choice of courses under the 
new curriculum so there may be a wider field in which 
schools may be truly preparatory. 

At the regular meeting of the Zeta Epsilon Society 
on Friday evening the program was opened by a debate 
— "Resolved, that the popular election of Senators 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



would reform our National Senate." Affirmative, W. 
F. Curry, J. M. Vance; Negative, H. W. Harris, C. A. 
Coolidge. Decision of judges was for the negative. 
T. C. Lininger rendered a vocal solo and G. T. B. Davis 
read a selection from "Sohrab and Rustom." Herbert 
Moore recited Artemus Ward'b opinions of "Wimen's 
Rights," and A. F. Waldo read a paper on "Prejudices." 
The program as a whole was excellent. 

The Freshmen, who had previously been quite re- 
served in their actions, made their debut on Hallowe'en, 
and appeared very much alive. They clearly showed that 
they were expert oontologists. Their midnight parade 
to the Sem. in colorless suits, carrying in state the de- 
ceased (?) body of '96, and the weird, long-drawn out 
tolling of the College bell, together with the abstrac- 
tion of said bell-rope, were merely outcroppings of 
latent talent. Too bad they lost the rope after taking 
the trouble to get it. They now rejoice in the fact 
that their colors waved triumphant from the top of the 
College dormitory all day Sunday and most of Monday. 

The Athenian Society held their regular meeting 
on Friday evening. A very entertaining and instruc 
tive talk on the Board of Trade was given by W. E. 
Danforth. The next on the program was an essay by 
A. B. Burdick, followed by an impromtu talk on "Banks 
and Banking" by J. H.Jones. The debate, resolved — 
" That the elections should be under the supervision of 
the federal government," was rendered in an intensely 
inteiesting manner by VV. U. Halbert for the affirma- 
tive and H. G. Timberlake for the negative. Both are 
new men and received the merited applause of all 
present. Several visitors were present among them 
Messrs Danforth, T. Stanley, Newton, Rossiter, Skin- 
ner and Erskine. 

While in Evanstonthe fellows noticed that although 
their gymnasium is not nearly so pretentious as ours, 
yet they have those things so necessary in a gymnasium, 
namely, lockers. Within a very small place 77 lockers 
were constructed. We have in our gymnasium p'enty 
of room for 100, which would be sufficient for our 
needs. This matter should be attended to and we 
should, if possible, secure some action on it. Another 
matter is in regard to covering for the running track. 
In almost all gymnasiums, on the surface of the running 
track a felt padding, especially prepared for the pur- 
pose, is laid. This makes dangerous slips by the run- 
ner less likely, saves shoes, is much easier on the feet, 
and causes no noise. 

Arrangements have been made for the Week of 
Prayer (Nov. 12-17) as follows: Three of the six 
meetings (Sunday, Monday and Friday) will be union 
services of the College, Seminary and Academy ; on the 
other evenings the Seminary will hold separate services. 
The meetings will probably be as follows: Sunday 
afternoon at 3 130 o'clock in the College Chapel ; Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday evenings at Reid Hall; Thurs- 
day evening in College chapel, and the closing meeting on 
Friday evening in Ferry Hall chapel. The evening 
services will begin promptly at seven o'clock. The 
Associations have secured for this week the services of 
several prominent Association workers. Mr. L. W. 
Messer the general secretary of the Chicago Y. M. C. 
A. will be with us one or two evenings as will al«o one 
or 'wo of his assistants. It is earnestlv hope I 1 hat every 
student will unite heartily to make this Wiek of Prayer 
a giand success and a great stimulus to our work for 
the remainder of the year. 



FERRY HALL. 

The young ladies are much indebted to one of the 
crowds that serenaded on Friday evening for seme good 
music. 

Lost, strayed, or stolen — a small alarm clock has 
been missing since October 27th. A just reward will 
be given when returned to room 1 15. 

Mrs C. B. Farwell lectured to the members of the 
Aletheian Society last Friday evening on "The English 
Bible." It was a most delightful talk and was highlv 
appreciated by the girls. 

Perhaps it is not known that a larger part of Mid- 
way Plaisanee has been transferred to Ferrv Hall, 
north wing, second floor, but such is the case. There 
may be found the Beauty Show next door to Hagen- 
beck's with the Street in Cairo and the Zoopraxo- 
graphical Hall just opposite. Other interesting exhibits 
are the Persian and Egyptian Theatres, the "Fairies" 
Wheel, the Moorish Palace and Enchanted Maze, and 
the usual Bureau of Information and Guard House are 
near at hand. The guard is very courteous and i-. glad 
to show visitors the way out if they enter at the wrong 
time of day. 

Monday was a holiday at the Sem. as well as at the 
College, but it was only given under condition that no 
disturbance be made on Hallowe 'en. The Juniors con- 
sented to this with downcast faces, but after all a whole , 
day off is better than bothering the Seniors for only one 
evening. They had a party too and it would have been 
cruel if all their guests had been forced to go home 
bareheaded, which they surely would have done if the 
promise to be good had not been given. If the truth 
were known, the Seniors were much relieved when the 
faculty made that condition. Thirteen girls spent the 
day at the Fair, with Prof. Eager as chaperon. This 
was one of the instances where the "unlucky thirteen" 
was a misnomer. 

The Senior Class entertained a few of their friends 
at a Hallowe'en party last Tuesday evening. The 
parlors and one of the recitation rooms were opened 
for the guests. A bright fire in the back parlor fire- 
place shed a cheerful glow on the men)* gathering, and 
various games made the time pass pleasantly. First in 
order was a series of attempts to re-tail an inoffensive 
looking donkey. Mr. Goodman's effort was judged to 
be the most successful in this, hut in bobbing for apples, 
Dr. Seeley and Prof. Eager easily led. Chestnuts, 
apples and bowls of cider were ready at hand, while 
everyone seemed to know how to toast marshmallows. 
Indeed some few found this latter occupation so attrac- 
tive that they were hardly able to resign it for a mo- 
ment. The would be arlists had an opportunity to dis- 
play their skill in dr. 1 wing silhouettes, and Mr. Wright 
proved himself to be the first in iherace for "Jerusalem." 
All joined in singing college songs, but the hint con- 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



tained in the last one was too strong, so the company 
broke up, each one declaring that he had enjoyed a 
delightful evening. 

It was in the autumn of '93, 
We never again shall that night see. 
Some merry Sophs, to the Sem. did hie, 
And to one lone Freshman bad good-bye. 

They hung him high in a maple tree, 
Where all could him next morning see; 
For they dressed a stick in crimson and white, 
And on his back " '97" did write. 

Next morning at chapel the girls in a mass 
Told of the trouble befalling the class; 
The Freshmen were sad and with many a sigh 
Betook themselves soon to the trees high. 

Each of the boys, with an uncovered head, 
Looked at his brother hanging dead. 
Up climbed Roberts to let him down, 
While others wept for this man of renown. 

They laid him on a wooden board 

And thought of the place where his soul had soared; 

They carried him down to the deep ravine, 

Where Freshmen often do convene. 

Through his heart a stick they fix, 

Which changed him to a '96, 

And when the counts are given in Heaven, 

'97- 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Contributions are always gladly received for this 
department. It is not an easy matter to produce each 
week a page of Academy news. Therefore all should 
assist in doing something to fill the page and make it 
interesting at the same time. 

We wish to thank Prof. Smith for the article on 
"Self Help" which he contributed for the last issue. 

Prof. Whitford has charge of our library. We can 
modestly point to about four hundred volumes of the 
very best works. The library is in a large and well- 
lighted, room with plenty of space for more shelves, 
which we hope will soon be there and filled. That the 
students appreciate the library can be seen by their in- 
dustrious patronage of it. 

ACADEMY LACONICS. 

F. C. Vincent, '93, was in town last week. 

Mrs. Smith is enjoying a visit from her mother. 

Hinckley is the smallest man at present in the Acad- 
emy. 

In Mr. Hedges the Academy this year has a vio- 
linist of rare qualities. 

The reports for the first half of the Fall teim were 
read in chapel last Thursday. 



"Gimpy" Smith is getting that far-away, wistful 
look into his eyes that Prof. Dudley has had so long. 

W. II. Hughitt, an old Academy student, is now 
working in the General Freight department of the C. 
and N. W. Railway. 

The class in Iliad, under Prof. Burnap, is preparing 
a special Homeric vocabulary, consisting of words fre- 
quently repeated in the text. 

Of late the students residing in the Cottage have 
been heaping both insult and injury on the reading- 
room in that place. This should be stopped imme- 
diately. 

The "Palmer House," run on the "Roman Plan," 
has just been opened in East Dormitory. For refer- 
ences on the menu apply to "Captain" Williams or 
"General" Kilgour. 

The generally lawless order of the Rhetoric class 
deserves comment. Several times in last Saturday's 
recitation the proceedings were interrupted by the boy- 
ish pranks of a few. 

Chas. Durand is playing right half back for An- 
dover Academy. He has the honor of having played 
with the only team which has scored against Harvard 
this year up to date. 

A select party of about twenty delvers into the 
realms of thought from this institution, found their 
way into the city last Monday in search of the Fair. An 
enjoyable time was the result. Kline and Wright were 
admitted on childrens' tickets. 

The Tri Kappa society is still busy changing its 
constitution. In last Wednesday's meeling a motion 
was made for an amendment that a different member 
should be chosen to piesideover each literary meeting 
in place of the president. This amendment will be 
voted upon next Wednesday. 

Prof. Williams is very modest and courageous. But 
he is reported as s lying that more nerve is required in 
the parlor when the gas burns low, to express the deep 
thoughts of the heart, than to buck the line in foot-ball. 
Prof. Dudley doubtless agrees with this statement, 
though Prof. Whiteford is rather in doubt about it. 

HaUowe'en was celebrated in a becoming and dig- 
nified manner in the Academy. It has been reported 
that not a few students failed to discriminate between 
doors and windows after ten o'clock on that night. 
But Hallowe'en only comes once a year, and that 
•s a great consolation for those who were unable to find 
heir senior privileges on the morning of Nov. l. 

BOOK REVIEWS. 
It is reported that Dr. Palmer is just finishing an- 
other new novel, entitled, "Climbing Rufus" or "How 
To Get Through the Window Unobserved." 

"Lake Fores' After Dark," by Mr. Geigh Levering. 

Mr. L. Greenwood has suddenly become a poet. 
" Peace to his ashes." 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The following verses are from the pen of a poetically inclined 
Academy student. 

MY SWEETHEART. 
You ask if she's pretty, I cannot say no, 
And yet it may be, you would not think so; 
'Tis not only her beautiful face, 'tis her ways, 
That makes me remember for long, long days, 
My sweetheart. 

Her honest brown eyes would scorn to coquette, 
She's something far more than a doll or a pet, 
Her voice is so low, her words are so kind, 
The dearest girl in the world I find 
My sweetheart. 

Everyone loves her, and why should they not? 
Since everyone's best to her shrine is brought; 
Faults ne'er are talked of, wrong never implied, 
Yet nobler and purer one grows at her side, 
My sweetheart. 

Birds that she loves sing more sweet than before, 
Flowers bloom more sweetly that she has passed o'er, 
God's world has new meaning, below and above, 
Since to me has been given her soul's pure love, 
My sweetheart. — L. G. 



COMMUNICATION. 
To the Editor : 

The University has good cause to be proud of her 
football team this season, but the men themselves who 
fight so hard for the fame and name of our Alma 
Mater might be treated with more consideration. 

I have seen more than one complaint printed in this 
paper upon the way our team was treated away from 
home. I wish to argue for one thing being done for 
its comfort in our own town. After a man has played 
a long and hard fought game he feels little like walk- 
ing home nearly a mile from the station, and what is 
more, carrying a heavy satchel. Particularly is this term 
if any one has been hurt. I know personally of two 
men, two of the best players of the team, who, after 
the Chicago University game, were so sore and lame 
that walking was difficult, yet had to walk home and 
carry their luggage. It seems to me, an outsider, that 
this is either gross negligence on the part of the man- 
agement or utter lack of appreciation and sympathy on 
the part of the students. Let the 'bus meet the boys on 
their return, and thus save a long and painful walk. 

— F. M. S. 



doubtedly have won the game if it had not been for the 
contemptible action of a member of the Morgan Park 
faculty, named Caldwell, who was referee iii the last 
half. 

Morgan Park won the toss. They opened with a 
wedge and gained 5 yards. Then by a series of long 
runs around the ends they made a touchdown, but 
failed to kick goal. Lake Forest took the ball and 
made 10 yards on a flying wedge. Bv continual buck- 
ing the Academy made a touchdown and Woelfel 
failed to kick goal. M. P. took the ball, and by a wedge 
and runs around the ends scored a touchdown, but again 
failed to kick goal. Then L. F. A. took the ball, made 
40 yards by the flying wedge, and bucked a touchdown. 
No goal. Ball went to the center of the field and time 
was called for the first half. Score S to S. 

In the second half L. F. A. made fifteen yards with 
a flying wedge. At this juncture the ball was lost to 
M. P. on a fumble. The Academy held them to three 
downs. M. P. punted and Campbell caught the ball and 
made a fine run of 30 yards. Lake Forest bucked another 
touchdown and Woefel again failed to kick goal. Morgan 
Park took the ball, opened with a wedge, and made 2 
yards. Here the referee called this first down. Morgan 
Park failed to gain 5 yards in four downs and L. F. A. 
took possession of the ball. Williams bucked the line 
and yelled "down," and the referee blew his whistle. 
Their center-rush then grabbed the ball after it was 
down and got within 5 yards of the L. F. goal. The 
referee allowed this play, by which he virtually pre- 
sented M. P. with a touchdown as M. P. ran around the 
end, securing a touchdown and kicked goal. To gain 
this touchdown the referee gave them two minutes 
over time. Lake Forest took the ball to the middle of 
the field and time was called soon after, the final score 
standing 14 to 12 in favor of Morgan Park Academy. 

Among the special features of the game were 
Miller's bucking in the first half and Captain Williams 
in the second, together with Morgan Park's interfer- 
ence and L. F. A.'s defensive play. But the greatest 
feature of all was the prodigious nerve exhibited by 
Morgan Park's referee. 



ACADEMY DEFEATED BY MORGAN PARK. 

CLAIM THE REFEREE WAS RESPONSIBLE. 

On Saturday afternoon the Academy foot-ball team 
played the Morgan Park Academy team at Morgan 
Park. This was the first defeat of the season for the 
Academy eleven, but it was a very close game, result- 
ing in the score of 14 to 12. The Academy would un- 



Chicago University will have a Glee Club this year* 
As they already have a University Orchestra, we may 
expect music this year, with a vengeance. 



I took my books the other day 
And studied in the Quad, alone, 
But no professor passed that way, 
I wasn't called on the next day; 
That work was never known. 

Up on the road beside the brook, 

One little hour we two beguiled; 

I never looked inside a book, 

But I met each Prof, whose work I took, 

And when I flunked, he smiled. 

Sequoia. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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TEETH tx> 



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Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
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FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

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and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

* DENTAL SURGERY 



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* £ * * * 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the Ameri.can law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the ohsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
Amer'ean. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
"Local Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States,". 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooley' s work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the tru.- laborers in that field, the men who are to rer-p its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acqui ing an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agretable introduction. 

" Nor, although there are manv things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be iike studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principle s of life which animated it. And it is no'iceable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have nevi r been made, and "here much of the ncent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in noway 



concerns us. 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS $9 50, PREPAID ON R CEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 1 14 Monroe St., Chicago. 



STI J OP NTS P resentin g //us a( Z- wil1 be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

$ ^ The Model Clothing House, 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., 

"The [V|odel" makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN, 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats vf Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having le-s than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. " Verbum Sat Sapient '/." 




XEbe Craig Ipress, 

printers, ipubltsbers, ^Designers 

i7S=tS2 ZlDonroe Street 

Cbicacjo. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

A Complete Line of the 

Celebrated 

Victor Bicycles, 



Shaker Sweaters, 

Base Ball, 

Lawn Tenis, 

Photographic Supplies, Etc. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros., 
108 Madison Street, 



Chicago. 



W. E. FUSTON. Agent. Lake Forest, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 

Practical 

PLUMBER ^ GAS FITTER, 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



J. G. Cornish, 



DEAI-EK IN 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRestauraut an& 

* (Iboice Confectioner?, 

ice cream and salads of all kinds 

made to order — 

choice Confectionery a specialty. 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, « 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND .MANUKACTUREK OF 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 



Lake Forest, III. 



F. BA1RSTOW, 



DEAI.EK IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



marble and granite monuments, 
building stone, lime and cement, 
sewer pipe, drain tile, etc . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



ROBERT MERCER, 

- LAKE FOREST, ILL 

CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
PIPES, AND 
STATIONERY. 
AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
AND DEALERS IN 



MEDICAL and 
SCIENTIFIC 



..BOOKS 



96 Washington Street, 
Chicago. 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. III. 

N ORMAN J. ROBERTS, 

DENTAL 



SURGEON 



WAUKEGAN, ILL. 



Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

* * HARNESS, 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

DIAXlMrrc c REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE. 

BLANkhTS, Etc. 

Waukegan, III. 



(JANDY 

CANDY 
CANDY 



Send $1.25, $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box by express, 
of the best candies in America, 
put up in Elegant Boxes and 
Strictly Pure. Suitable for 
presents. Express charges pre- 
paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all Chicago. Try it once. 
ADDRESS. 

C FGUNTHER 

CONFECTOINER- 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



A.H.ABBOTT&C0. 

50MADIS0KST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A.M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 

Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROVVER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. II. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



A 



HICAGO 
COLLEGE 



^«^ /^f~\J T JZ/^^XZ THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 

LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



OF 



LAW 



FACULTY 



HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, CHICAGO 

79 DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J" & CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS, 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



November 14, 1893. 
> 1— V 



No. 7 







LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 5. 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, coeducational. 6. 

AT LALE FOREST. ILL. 



AS FOLLOWS: 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 

CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) Erench- 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Bibical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address, 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake'Forest, It.i . 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




J MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Chicago's Leading Religious II eektg. 

Good 

Sunday 




For Sale at Dewstamds. 



Reading 



W. J. ROOT, 



HIGH ART 



Kimball Hall, 243 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

Typewriting and 
Manifolding. 

You can secure the best results. 
You can obtain more work for your money. You can 
obtain more Manifold Copies, and you will always be 
pleased by bringing your manuscript copy to me. 

A. B. BURDICK, 

College. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Purchase n ° 

Books, 

Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



(';!") 



BRUBAKER 

Waukegan, III. 

NEW LOCATION. NEW ROOMS. 

NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited. 

Yours truly, 
126 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 

Whe Celebrated fsger 

D. R. COOVER. 

Ipbotocjrapber, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 

pDMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 

ftotice to Hfcvertisers. 

If for any reason you are not satisfied with 
the shape, size or position of your ad., please address 

C. B. Moore, advertising agent, Lake Forest, 
do not let any little grievance like above named, run along 
indetlnately and make it a cause for getting out of your 
contract. All that is possible will be done to correct any 
errors. 




The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, iSqj 



No 7. 



A HARD FOUGHT GAME. 

LAKE FOREST 22; NORTHWESTERN 3S. 

The second foot-ball game with Northwestern was 
played at Evanston last Saturday afternoon before about 
five hundred spectators, including a large delegation of 
strong-lunged shouters from our Chicago Law school. 
The first game having resulted in a tie naturally added 
interest to the outcome. An air of uncertainty per- 
vaded the Lake Forest delegation previous to the game, 
but it was changed to cheerful expectation by the rapid 
manner in wnich our boys scored two touchdowns. 
But the black shadow of defeat, in the person of North- 
western's left half back, was lying in wait for us. It 
was a clear case of what the Southerners call "negro 
supremacy." The negro race, in the person of one 
Jewett, played foot-ball in a way calculated to make a 
white man ashamed of himself. His playing was un- 
doubtedly the prime cause of Evanston's victory, but 
her team was greatly strengthened and improved since 
the game two weeks ago. Our line, on the other hand, 
was considerably weakened, though the boys played 
a strong game despite that fact. 

At 3:15 the teams lined up as follows: — 

LAKE FOREST. NORTHWESTERN. 

Adams left end Pearson 

Woolsey " tackle Van Doozer 

Moore " guard Wilkinson 

Hunt center Pearce 

H. Thorn right guard Scott 

Rice " tackle Libberton 

Vance " end VVitwer 

Hayner, Capt. quarter Griffith, Capt. 

D.Jackson left half E.Williams 

Lee right half Jewett 

D. Williams full back Noyes 

L. F- won the toss and the ball. Eighteen yards 
were made on the opening play, Williams carrying the 
ball. N. W. got the ball on a fumble but lost it shortly 
after to Hayner. Williams and Lee made gains which 
carried the ball up the field slowly. Woolsey made a 
good gain but the ball was lost to N. W. on a fumble. 
L. F. held their opponents to four downs and again got 
the ball. Lee, Woolsey and Williams broke through 
N. W. line for steady gains. Williams carried the ball 
over the line for the first touchdown, but failed to kick 
goal. Score 4-0. 

N. W. tried the flying wedge for a short gain. The 
ball was lost to Lake Forest on four downs, but they 
failed to hold it loug. N. W. made some short gains 
but lost the ball again. Lee, Jackson and Woolsey 
made short gains, whon the ball was carried through 
center by Williams, who made a run of 35 yards before 



he was brought down by Jewett. Williams was shortly 
after pushed across the line for the second touchdown; 
goal was kicked making the score 100. 

The Lake Foresters at this time felt highly elated, 
as everything seemed to be coming their way. How- 
ever, other things were in store for them. 

N. W. made 12 yds. on a wedge trick, and Jewett 
shortly after followed this up with a splendid run of 25 
yards, being stopped bv Woolsey. At this point Hunt 
was seriouslg injured, and though continuing to play he 
was yet unable to put up his usually strong game. The 
ball was now near L. F. goal, and by short rushes was 
carried down the field till Williams was forced over the 
line, scoring the first touchdown for N. W. Noyes 
kicked goal. Score, L. F. 10, N. W. 6. 

Lake Forest made 5 yards on the opening play. 
Williams punted for 30 yards. N. W. got the ball 
and started it down the field. Williams, beautifullv 
guarded by Griffith, made a run of 30 yards. He was 
brought down in the finest tackle of the whole game 
by Woolsey who literally jumped over the interference. 
Williams shortly after this made the second touchdown 
for N. W. Noyes again kicked goal. N. W. 12, L. 
F. 10. 

L. F. made 13 yards on the wedge and followed it 
up with short gains by Lee, Woolsey and Williams. 
Some punting was done by both sides at this time. 
Shortly after this, on a pass back trick between Noyes 
and Jewett, the latter made another touchdown for N. 
W., from which Noyes kicked a goal. Score, N. W. 
iS, L. F. 10. 

Lake Forest held the ball but a short time before 
the end of the first half was called. 

The second half was almost a repetition of the first, 
with the exception that N. W. scored more easily than 
before. 

Four touchdowns, three of them by Jewett and one 
by Noyes, were made for N. W. in this half, from 
which Noyes kicked two goals. For L. F. two touch- 
downs, one by Rice, one by Jackson, were made, from 
which Williams kicked goals. The final score stood, 
N. W. 38, L. F. 22. 

NOTES OF THE GAME. 

Both teams put up a very poor defensive game. 

D. H. Williams' playing was remarkably good. He 
was the backbone of our team. 

For the first time this season Thorn met his match 
in Wilkinson, the N. W. left guard. 

Hayner's tackiing was phenomenal. He and Wool- 
sey made far more tackles than all the rest of the team 
combined. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Lake Forest's last touchdown was not due to the 
darkness as was claimed by some Evanston men, but 
was gained by a clever trick which would have 
worked just as well in broad daylight. 

An "undergraduate rule" would certainly be very 
greatly to Lake Forest's benefit if such an agreement 
could be established. It would cut N. W. off from her 
two best players, but would not necessitate any change 
whatever in our team. 

The following is a tabulated score, approximately 
correct: 



Adams. . 
Woolsey. 
Moore . . . 

Hunt 

Thorn . . . 

Rice 

Vance. . . 
Hayner . . 
Jackson. . 

Lee 

Williams. 



Yards 
Gained. 


Tackles. 


Touch 
downs 


3 

26 


2 
12 


O 
O 





1 


O 





I 


O 





I 


O 





7 


I 





2 


O 





'9 


O 


30 


2 


I 


7' 

1S5 


4 

6 


O 
2 



Referee, Gould, of Amherst. 
Umpire, J. Flint, of Chicago Univ 



3'5 5S 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK CLERKS, 0; 
LAKE FOREST, 20. 

On Tuesday afternoon a team composed of the 
First National Bank Clerks of Chicago played our 
team on the home grounds. The game was altogether 
one-sided, and at times laughable. However, there 
were occasional good plays, and two or three times our 
men were forced back with the ball. Fergus of the 
B. C.'s made most of their tackles, while Briggs, who 
played nearly every position on the team at one time or 
another, did most of the offensive work. The teams 
lined up as follows, at 3.30. 

BANK CLERKS. LAKE FOREST. 

Crouse left end Adams 

Don Kennedy " tackle Wolsey 

Claflin " guard Reinhart 

Briggs center Hunt 

Fergus right guard Thorn 

Harris right tackle Cragin 

Dundee « end Rice 

Cary right half Wood 

Prince left half A.Jackson 

Williams quarter back Hayner, capt 

Woelfcl full back Fales 

Referee — Goodman, Lake Forest. 

Umpire — Seixas, Chicago Athletics. 

Time of Game, 50 minutes. 

Bmk Cleiks opened with a wedge and gained S 
y s 'out soon lost ball on four downs. Rice gained 



thirty yards, but having fumbled the ball Wolsey 
dropped it for a touchdown. Bank Clerks opened but 
soon lost ball, and Lake Forest kicked. After a few 
minutes of play, during which the Bank Clerks were 
steadily pushed down the field, Fales ran round the end 
for a touchdown. Bank Clerks opened but soon lost 
ball, and after Jackson had gained 20 yds. Vance 
caught the ball and ran 25 yds. for a touchdown. After 
some more playing time was called with ball in pos- 
sesion of Bank Clerks. Score, 12-0. 

In second half L. F. opened with the flying wedge 
and gained 35 yds. They then lost ball on four downs, 
but on a fumble Hunt got the ball and made a touch- 
down. B. C. opened but soon lost ball. L. F. kicked. 
At this point Briggs made a good run of 35 yds. on a 
bluff kick. After a few minutes play L. F. pushed up 
the field, and Jackson was shoved across the line for a 
touchdown. After some more play the game ended. 
Score, 20-0. 

The Bank Clerks filled out their team by borrow- 
ing two men from the Academy. Lake Forest did not 
play her usual team, but put in several subs, for sake of 
practice. Among the features of the game was the 
playing of Williams, the B. C. quarter. Quickly 
getting aid of the ball, he would rush madly into the 
interference, knocking men right and left, and shoving 
a path for the runner. 

Lake Forest's poor goal-kicking was also a feature. 
This lost our first Evanston game, and some one should 
be coached up to kick goals. 



ATHLETICS. 

As a result of the struggle over the undergraduate 
rule in the east, Pennsylvania and Wesleyan have re- 
tired from the association. This leaves the field open 
for a league of the three large colleges — Yale, Harvard 
and Princeton — which will probably be formed. 

We were pleased to see the fair-minded way in 
which our fellows treated Beloit during the game. 
Every good play was cheered, no matter whether 
made by our own team or the Beloits. Atkinson in 
particular drew loud applause for his brilliant playing. 

As winter approaches, and the weather becomes 
cooler, the gymnasium is being daily more frequented. 
It would be well then, at this time to say a word in 
regard to boxing gloves and a punching bag. As will 
be remembered, at the beginning of last year we had 
both gloves and a punching bag. However, during 
the first term the "Senator" threw the gloves into the 
kerosene barrel, which very effectually destroyed their 
usefulness, and they were never replaced. The punch- 
bag also early in the year was damaged in some way 
and, like the gloves, we saw no more of it. It is about 
time something should be done about the.se things. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



5 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 

If the Lake Forest departments of L. F. U. have 
been resting with the idea that they possessed all the 
spirit and enthusiasm of the University, they have been 
decidedly mistaken, for there exists in Chicago, one de- 
partment at least, that has enterprise enough to make 
the undergraduates stretch themselves a little. Last 
Tuesday Mr. Crampton of the Junior Class of the 
Chicago College of Law, came out to Lake Forest in 
the interests of University spirit and athletics, and in- 
vited a few of the fellows to go into the city the fol- 
lowing Thursdav evening to meet the class of '95. 
Messrs. Bourns, Bird, Lewis and Jones, J. H., accepted 
the invitation, and were right royally entertained. 
Covers were set for twenty at the "La Fayette," and 
there they sat down to a very elaborate and daintily 
served dinner. The table was prettily deccrated with 
'Varsity colors, and at the head stood a placard, on 
which was painted the L. F. U. yell, and before theparty 
adjourned to the class room, "Hi, ho, ha!" was well 
learned. At nine o'clock the Junior Class, consisting 
of nearly two hundred members, was called to order by 
its president, Mr. Swansen, and for over an hour the 
floor was occupied by enthusiastic men talking of, and 
praising L. F. U. and foot-ball. 

It was suggested that a car be chartered for the 
Evanstou game Saturday, and in five minutes the cash 
was in the treasurer's hands. A lively interest was 
aroused in University affairs, and never was the yell 
given with more vim and vigor than on Thursday night 
in the Atheneum Building. At ten-thirty the Lake 
Forest delegation left for the train, highly pleased 
with the reception accorded them and with the 
spirit and enthusiasm shown by the Junior Law Class. 
They proved that their interest was permanent by the 
way in which thev turned out to the game Saturday. 



CHAPEL TALKS. 

Dr. Coulter has inaugurated an injoyable and in- 
structive practice, that of giving chapel talks. During 
the past week he has been speaking for a few moments 
each morning on the development of the American 
College curriculism. 

In the beginning it was based solely on the philos- 
ophy of Aristjtle, then on the tripos, Latin, Greek and 
Mathematics. This was meant to be a course for the 
training of the mind and in so far as it was used it ac- 
complished its end but all men could not be brought 
under this tripos and hence these caused the pressure of 
subjects which started the movement which is still 
going on, that of broadening the college curriculum. 
This movement naturally divides itself into three 
phases, the Classical, the Patchwork and the present 
elective system which is not by any means finished. 
The classical phase consisted more in the study of clas- 
sics than anything else — a result of the action of the 
law of the survival of the fittest — the fittest beine 



classical men, because science was not well taught nor 
was there much known concerniug it. Then came the 
demand of the students for a greater variety of subjects 
and as a result the "Patchwork" stage in which there 
was no apparent appreciation of the relative value of 
studies. "It was an attempt to put a maximum number 
of subjects in a minimum of amount of time." The 
whole system was away from the thoroughness. The 
professors were neither scholars nor specialists. The 
only gain of this phase was that it opened the way for 
a better, the modern idea of electives. This system 
requires that there be a more thorough preparation, 
that all subjects be placed on the same basis and that 
the student assume the responsibility of choosing his 
own course. Freedom is essential to scholarship. 
Again by the law of the survival of the fittest our 
faculties will be better because students can now choose 
courses for professors. The deficiencies of this method 
are that lazy students will chose "snap" courses, erratic 
courses and will tend to premature specialization. The 
answer to these objections are that colleges are not for 
lazy students and lazy students can always make snap 
courses, erratic courses are often the best; and lastlv 
every subject cannot be taught to every student. 




MR. LELAN'D T. POWERS. 

We present above a cut of Mr. Leland T. Powers, 
who has been engaged to appear in Lake Forest, on 
Saturday evening, the 25th inst. He will present his 
wonderful impersonations of the characters of "David 
Copperfield." Of Mr. Powers it has been said that "he 
has discovered a new field, and one which gives what 
is good in the drama without its abominations." He 
carries his audience at will from ectasies of merriment 
into tenderest sympathy. Mr. Powers has appeared 
with great success in the eastern states, and is fast mak- 
ing a name for himself in the West. Tickets, price 75 
and 50 cents, will be placed on sale within a few davs. 



The Round Table of Nov. 1, contains an essav on 
the necessity of Humane Education by W. H. Short, 
'94, Beloit, which won the $200 prize offered by the 
Humane Society last year. 

Recitations at the Lniversity of Wisconsin are now 
conducted six days in the week. 

We welcome to our table " The IntesraP from 
Case School of Applied Science. It contains this week 
an excellent article emphasizing the necessity of breath 
in education. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94 
W. B. Hunt, '94, 

A. O. Jackson, '96, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 
Miss Lucia Clark, 
Miss Louise Conger, 
S. E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, I 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Locals 

Town 

- Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

• Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



terms. 
Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



*l-50 

.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

ONE class in the Law School to whom the 
plan of " University Day "was suggested, 
responded very favorably to the idea, and we 
have no doubt, that all the city departments 
would be equally pleased to co-operate if the 
plan should be put into execution. 

* * 
* 

ONE of the very best papers in its field to- 
day is the Young Men's Era, the na- 
tional organ of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. Its editorial department, news 
and contributed articles can be read with much 
profit, and we take pleasure in giving it this 
unsolicited recommendation. 

* # 

* 

A SIGN of the times which cannot escape 
an observer of the college world is the 
decline of hazing. Our own college has this 
year been free from it, and in the large Eastern 
schools the same is true, with possibly one ex- 
ception. Evidently this "relic of barbarism" is 
gradually being relegated to the rear. Think- 
ing men will join in wishing it God-speed in 
its journey to oblivion. 



OUICK work was done in order to give the 
report of the foot-ball game in the last 
issue of The Stentor. As a rule, Saturday's 
news is the latest which we can publish, but 
the Beloit game took place Monday afternoon. 
The copy was taken to the printer in Chicago 
earl)' Tuesday morning, and on the evening 
of that day the papers were issued, containing 
a full account of the game. 



* * 

# 



A THING which this town needs and the 
institution needs is a better system 
of lighting. The present system is really 
no system at all, and is almost a disgrace 
to the town. So much has been expended 
for paving, bridges, water works, etc., that 
the Council will hardly be able to do anything 
in this line for some time at least. But why 
would it not be well for the University to have 
an independent incandescent lighting plant? 
The expense would not be great, and would 
be chiefly for the wiring, as there is already 
boiler capacity enough to run a small dynamo. 
The gain over the inadequate and unreliable 
gasoline lights would be immense. We com- 
mend the idea to the consideration of the 
trustees. 



# * 

* 



JUST now it is a question with the foot-ball 
teams as to whether two victories in one 
week counter-balance one defeat within the 
same time. A few pessimists seem inclined 
to rail against the decrees of fate, but The 
Stentor always takes an optimistic view of 
these matters. The team certainly have no 
reason to feel ashamed of their work, — in fact 
there is a great deal to be proud of in this 
year's foot-ball record thus far. The eleven has 
had to contend with many difficulties. The 
preliminary obstructions were no sooner clear- 
ed away than new ones appeared. Lake For- 
est gave Northwestern a hard battle on Satur- 
day last, and this in spite of the changes which 
accidents and misfortunes have compelled the 
captain to make in the constitution of the team. 
We see nothing to criticise but much to praise. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Prof. Dawson was confined to his house part of last 
week owing to sickness. 

The Thorn brothers were visited by Mr. Newell, 
a friend from Springfield. 

" Tod" Grant and " foe" Flint were out last week 
watching- the play of the football team. 

Mr. A. \V. Doran, '93, M. Y. (Master Yeller) as- 
sisted in the howling at the Beloit game. 

Mr. C. E. Latimer has returned much strengthened 
after a three weeks stay in Xew York state. 

The services of the Week of Prayer were begun 
Sunday afternoon with a well attended meeting led by 
Dr. Coulter. 

Miss Lottie Liese, ex-'95, visited her Aletheian 
friends Friday evening. She is at present a cadet in the 
city schools. 

The Chicago University second eleven will play 
the home second eleven on Wednesday the 15th. Ad- 
mission 15 cents. 

Prof. Stanley is busily engaged in making a "find- 
ing list" of the library. It will be published about 
Thanksgiving time. 

A. Haberli has the agency for Dr. Barrow's history 
of the "Parliament of Religions" — a book which can 
be read with much profit. 

Several Evanston students were on our side lines 
during the Beloit game, among whom we noticed 
Capt. Griffith and Manager Ramsey. 

James Whitcomb Riley and Douglass Shirley will 
give an entertainment under the auspices of the Athen- 
ian Society, on Thursday evening, Dec. 14th. 

It has been decided that it will be advisable to issue 
an Annual this year, and various places are being can- 
vassed, but nothing definite has been done as yet. 

Mr. Byers of McCormick Seminary, and Mr. 
Cooke of Heck Hall, Evanston, formerly of Emporia 
College, were the guests of 94's trio from that college 
last Sundav. 

Final examinations in several studies were held last 
week. Examinations at this time of year has hitherto 
been something unnsual. They are the outgrowth of 
our new system of studies. 

The Stentor Company are grateful to Mr. Marvin 
Hughitt, Pres. of the C. and X. W. R. R., also a 
trustee of this university, for kindly furnishing neces- 
sary railway transportation. 

J. A. McGaughey, who left here for Monmouth, 
seems to be a "big gun" down there. He says in a 
letter to one of the fellows that he is addressed by the 
Monmouth students as Professor. 



One might have supposed, however, by the way in 
which it was guarded when being removed, that the 
Sophomores were as many in number as the autumn 
leaves now strewed upon the giound. 

The Zeta Epsilon Society will try "Prendergast" for 
the shooting of Mayor Harrison, next Friday evening. 
The proceedings will be conducted in judicial form, and 
the case promises to be an interesting one. 

The Sophomores have challenged the Freshmen to 
a football game in the near future. No date has yet 
been decided on, but all may rest assured that the game 
will be for blood. The Freshman flog is a "thing of 
beauty and a joy forever." 

From all reports the Ghost Dance given at the 
"Sem." one night last week, did hor seem to meet the 
Principal's approval. Whether there were any really 
improper proceedings connected with the performance 
we have been unable to find out. 

The foot-ball management has ordered new stock- 
ings and under sweaters for the men on the team. This 
will give our team a much better general appearance on 
the field. Hitherto they have been accustomed to 
playing under any colors they could get hold of. 

The First National Bank Clerks made a very 
favorable impression among the fellows out here. 
They played a very clean game of ball, and said after- 
wards that they were rather surprised at the gentle 
treatment they received from our team; their only 
complaint was on the ^Macadam covering on our 
grounds. 

At present the faculty are busily engaged in the 
revision of the requirements for admission. The 
revision does not mean any change in the standard of 
admission, but it does mean a broader, more "cosmopol- 
itan" standard, so that just as there is a wider choice of 
courses under the new curriculum so there may be a 
wider field in which schools may be truly preparatory. 

About one hundred new books have been placed in 
the library recently, Sixty volumes were added to the 
English department, among which were Matthew 
Arnold's and Emerson's complete works, Geo. W. 
Cable's novels and Lomsbury's Chaucer in 2 volumes, a 
very fine edition. Prof. McNeil's department received 
fifteen volumes, Prof. Halsey's a dozen and the rest are 
scattering. 

The Zeta Epsilon meeting for Nov. 10th was made 
especially interesting by its spirited debate on the "Dar- 
winian Theory." The speakers in behalf of the theory 
were C. Thorn and J. Stearns; negative, H. P. Ded- 
rickson and W. E. Williams. Decision of judges, two 
to one for the negative. The rest of the program was 
as follows: — Declamation, F. C. Ritchie. Book review, 
E. E. Vance; Impromptu, H. L. Bird. 

The Junior evening in the Aletheian Society proved 
such an intellectual treat that the programme com- 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



mittee commanded the members of '94 and '96 to take 
charge of an evening. This explains the sounds of 
mirth and revelry which issued from the Aletheian 
Hall Friday evening. The exercises consisted of music, 
classical and otherwise, Speakin' Day in the District 
School, and shadow pantomimes. The Seniors and 
Sophs are now ready to arrange dates for the Holiday 
season. 

The Athenian Society held their regular meeting 
on Friday evening. The first number on the program 
was a declamation by J. H. Jones, entitled " Absalom." 
The selection was admirably rendered. Mr. Goodman 
gave an interesting talk on " What constitute a talk." 
A question box was conducted by A. O.Jackson. The 
last number on the program was a spirited debate on 
the question, — "Resolved, that preachers should be 
politicians." Affirmative, C. O. Parish; negative, D. 
Fales. Decision of judges was for the affirmative. 

Miss Marie Skinner very pleasantly entertained the 
young ladies of the Freshman and Sophomore classes 
at her home Saturday, three to six; the entertainment 
being a marshmallow toast. The decorations were in 
the colors of the two classes, and the place-cards, tied 
with red and black ribbon, were dainty souvenirs. The 
vice-presidents of the two classes presided at the table, 
where marshmallows were toasted and lighj refresh- 
ments served. The occasion was a most enjoyable one, 
and the thanks of the young ladies of '96 and '97 are 
due to their charming hostess. Those present were: 
Misses Keener, Kenaga, Giles, Fitz-Randolph, Mc- 
Clenehan, Brown, Pierce, Cooke, Wetherhold, Hodge, 
Darby, Mellen and McLean. 



A MUSICAL ASSOCIATION. 

At a meeting last Thursdays evening, of all students 
interested in having a University Glu and Banjo Club, 
it was decided to form a Musical Association of Col- 
lege and Academy. A committee of three, Messrs. 
Harris, Goodman and Gilleand were appointed by 
temporary chairman Chas. G. Smith to draw up a 
constitution and be ready to report at the meeting to 
be held this coming Thursday evening. 



THE READING ROOM. 

Our large reading room is beginning to lose its 
barren appearance. The students are indebted to Mrs. 
C. B. Farwell for the "Independent," to Prof. Schmidt 
for "Ueber Land und Meer," to Prof. McNeil for 
"Fliegende Blatter" and to A. Haberli for "The Voice." 
It has been suggested that others might wish to give 
if they only knew what was needed. Thinking that a 
list of what we have would be the shortest way of say- 
ing what we need, we make the following additions to 
the above named publications: — "Popular Science 
Monthly," "Atlantic Monthly," "Homiletic Review," 
"University Magazine," "Review of Reviews," "Out- 
ing," "North American Review," "The Century," "The 
Forum," "Harper's Monthly" and "Weekly"," "The 
Illustrated American," "The Graphic," "Frank Leslie's 
Weekly," "Puck," "Judge," "Life," "The Missionary 
Review," "The Missionary Herald," "The W'eekly 
Mail and Express," "Presbyterian," N. Y. Weekly, 
Witness," "Public Opinion," "The Nation," "Wauke- 
gan Gazette," "Le Figaro" and Chicago "Tribune." 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Hodge was visited bv her father on Thurs- 
day. 

Miss Lititia Funk, a former student at Ferry Hall, 
visited Miss Titus Friday. 

Mrs. Hester kindly sang for the young ladies at 
chapel on Friday morning. 

Miss Barnes, of Karney, Neb., one of the old girls, 
spent Saturday with Miss Mcintosh. 

Mrs. Pride, of Chicago, spent Thursday with her 
daughter who had been ill several days. 

Miss Somerville was surprised on Friday evening 
by a little spread given in honor of her birthday. 

The Juniors are just beginning to make their mark 
in chemistry. One of the most brilliant members of 
the class poured some surplus H 2 SO 4 into a bottle of 
H CI. and was surprised to see it "bubble." 

The girls were not allowed to attend the ball game 
on Tuesday on account of a theatrical performance 
given by a limited number of the young gentlemen of 
Lake Forest on the front lawn on the night before. 

Judging from the tender inquiries made Wednesday 
evening, the Juniors were much distressed by the pov- 
erty of the Seniors. 

"O, you have to be a rusher of a dignified Senior, 
Or you won't stand in a little bit." 

At the request of the majority of the school, Doctor 
Seeley consented to make a change in the calendar. 
The vacation at Thanksgiving will be shortened to 
one day, with lessons the following Saturday to make 
up for that day, so that school may close about four 
days earlier at Christmas. 

The growing literary taste of the students is demon- 
strated by the number of books that are taken from the 
library; however, they are too often removed and re- 
placed without the knowledge of the librarians. This, 
as well as the number of papers and magazines left on 
the table, give much annoyance and trouble to those in 
charge. 

We are so glad that some people have sisters who 
get married and thus furnish amusement to those fool- 
ish Sems. who believe that dreaming on wedding cake 
effects their future state. But, alas! some who had 
considered their fate as already sealed with a happy 
seal, have found that nothing but the life of an old 
maid is left for them. These few (?) are the only ones 
who doubt the power of wedding cake to foretell the 
future. 

Any one who has been under the impression that 
the hard times are over with would have discovered 
his mistake if he could have visited one of the rooms in 
Ferry Hall on Wednesday evening. The occasion was 
a "hard times" party given by a few of the Seniors. In 
their relief at having completed their essays, they threw 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



off their dignity — for the evening -anil came in such 
variegated and unique costumes that a spectator would 
have been reminded of the old nursery rhyme, 
"The beggars are coming to town, 
Some in rags and some in tags." 

Wanted: — Fun and Frolic — Apply to the class of 
'94. For a fortnight, feasts of all descriptions have 
been nightly occurrences among the Seniors. The 
crowning one of the first scries took place last Friday 
eve, at the well-equipped cafe (if our popular city 
caterer, Mr. Matthews. The menu consisted of nice, 
large pan-cakes, or flapjacks if you please, served with 
with good old-fashioned maple syrup. This was what 
constituted the first course, the second was like unto it, 
and the third was the same as the first two. Ice water 
was furnished in abundance, as were also fresh, delicious 
cream-puffs, providing vou paid enough for them. 
Music — between courses — by the class president and 
her trained chorus. The repast, in itself, is one which 
will long be rem mbered by the participants; but the 
return home is one which will never be forgotten. As 
we neared the College a strong desire possessed us to 
return, in a measure, the many serenades which all 
Ferry Hall inmates have enjoyed so much. Arranging 
ourselves below the College windows in an effecth e 
group, more quality than quantity, we pealed forth 
sweetest strains of music upon the stillness of the mid- 
night air. On we sang, song after song pierced the 
evening atmosphere, until our stock was exhausted, 
with the exception of one wee song, saved as a response 
to the expected encore. We stopped and listened with 
bated breath everything was quiet. Xo deafening 
applause fell upon eager listening ears, not a moving 
inmate could be seen, not even a window was thrown 
open. Not, however, disheartened we recalled the 
proverb, instilled into our youthful minds: — "If at first 
you don't succeed, try, try again.''' We sounded the 
old saying in its length and breath, but all attempts 
seemed futile. Even our orchestra had not the power 
to entice a single individual from his occupation. 
Disappointed, and with vengeance in our hearts, we 
returned to the Sem. to find that the would-be clever 
Juniors, with the aid of the members of the first year 
class, had barricaded the doors of the Seniors' suites. 
For a time, it was impossible to gain an entrance; but 
"in union there is strength," and it took but a few mo- 
ments for some of our buxom Seniors to force the doors 
open, there to meet the baffled gaze of the weak and 
unsuspecting '95's. In thinking over our evening's 
escapade, we could not help but contrast the reception 
with which our serenade met, and that which is 
extended to the young gentlemen on their visits to the 
Sem. At the sound of the first foot step on the walk, 
and the first notes of "My Bonnie," every light is ex- 
tinguished, every curtain raised: and there is not a win- 
dow but what is thrown wide open, out of which pop 
at least ten heads. Applause upon applause echoes far 
and wide and : — 

After the serenade's over, 
After applause is won, 
After the Hall is still, dear, 
After the boys are gone: — 
Many the throats that are sore, dear, 
After the young men's raid, 
Manv the hands that are blistered 
After the serenade. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

A petition was circulated a few days aeo asking 

that the students of the third form should not be com- 
pelled to remain in the study room during the day. The 
just nature of this petition can easily be seen, and the 
Faculty should consider it seriously. Except probably 
in the case of the first form boys, who r.eed more over- 
sight on account of theii youth, the requirement of sit- 
ting in the study room which in former years was 
imposed only as a punishment, should be set aside. 

"To him who hath shall be given." Nowhere more 
than in the intellectual world d^es this saving hold true, 
ami it may be profitably ponderedby all students'. 

From the beginning of ihe year manv have re- 
marked upon the decreasing age of first form students. 
One may get an adequate idea of the relative size of a 
first form class's members from the following numbers. 
The ages of said members vary from 11 to 14 years; 
their average weight is about 90 lbs., one member 
weighing just 70 lbs. We believe that it would be 
butter for the Academy to require, according to the 
catalogue, an age of at least 14 yi ars. A class of stu- 
dents is too young when their age necessitates such a 
rule, as for instance, the required presence in the study 
room, and makes it necessary to state in catalogue that 
such students may ordinarily expect to spend two years 
in the first form. Beside, too, if there were not so 
many small boys, it would probably not be necessary 
for a professor to forget his dignity so much as to "lick" 
some of his pupils. 

ACADEMY LACONICS. 
Mrs. Annie Durand has kindly sent over to the 
College a fine pot of chrysanthemums. 

Gilleland and Hedges were called home Tuesday 
because of the death of their cousin, Dr. Hobart, of 
Chicago. 

A Learned Derivation 1 . — Mosquito [L. ablative 
absolute me scito~\ i. e.: to know me; to have sampled 
my quality. 

Notice to Third Form Students: — The "guard 
house" in Reid Hall will continue to be kept open for 
your accomodation. The Faculty. 

Prof. Palmer has developed a sudden tendency to- 
ward pugilism. Lie judiciously chooses, however, such 
opponents as are warranted to be easilv handled. Mar- 
quis of Queensbury rules are favored. 

Mr. W. E. Danforth, of the Chicago Tribune, 
paid Prof, and Mrs. Burnap a visit last week. Mr. 
Danforth was a student of the Academy when Dr. A. 
G. Wilson was principal. 

Durand Cottage receives with delight a proclama- 
tion of Prin. Smith's to the effect that three tardinesses 
to meals will cause a loss to the unfortunate late-comer 
of two hours on Saturday afternoon. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The plea which was made for a German table in 
this column a short time ago was evidently well re- 
ceived. To-day East Dormitory claims as one of its 
special features a table at which German only is spoken. 
Milwaukee beer and hot Frankfurt's are served every 
day. 

An old Academy member, Mr. A. E. Platz, of La 
Crosse, Wisconsin, spent a day with us last week. His 
fascinating variety is infinite. The tall gentleman says 
that "deacon" Medgry, another old student from the 
same place, is in partnership with his father, and is be- 
coming known as an expert sand-pounder. 

Messrs. Warren and Ewing on two different nights 
last week were startled by the crash of shattered win- 
dow glass, caused by a flying missile. The fact that 
three c jnseculive and successful attempts to break iheir 
windows have been made would point to somebody's 
destructive intentions. Investigation will be made of 
the matter. 



COMMUNICATION. 
To the Editor: 

The members of the Academy Foot Ball team feel 
that The Stentor in its athletic notes did them an in- 
justice last week when in a short paragraph it insinuat- 
ed that they took no interest in ihe 'varsity team and 
would not give them as much practice as possible. 
This assertion is untrue. Every member of the Acade- 
my team takes almost as great an interest in the 'Var- 
sity team as in the Academy team and has never re- 
fused to practice against them except on the evening 
preceeding a game and would probably have played 
them then, but for the fact that the 'Varsity line is so 
much heavier than the Academy line that it is almost 
mpossible to get up any kind of interference. 

* * # 



ALUMNI. 

Rev. B. Fay Mills is conducting a series of meet- 
ings in the Fullerton Avenue church in Chicago, and 
after Thanksgiving he will transfer his field to the 
Church of the Convant — the McCormick Seminary 
chnrch. 

After spending his summer in inspecting emigrant 
trains and vaccinating the South-west portion of Chica- 
go for the Health Department, A. G. Wilson, of '92, is 
back at Rush Medical College. "Aleck's" inspecting 
zeal trieJ to include a World's Fair family party down 
in Ohio and caused him to beat a hasty retreat before 
the indignani emigrant. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bergen are at home in one of 
the most beautiful houses in Highland Park, on Laurel 
Avenue, justeast of the subway. Dr. Bergen has fitted 
up his interior in hardwood in exquisite finish, and has 
introduced electric lighting and hot water heating. 
The main floor includes a well equipped suite of profes- 
sional offices and a conservatory. 



At a banquet of the Lake County Medical Society 
given at Waukegan, Nov. 4th, after our village physi- 
cian Dr. Haven had spoken to the toast, "The humor- 
ous side of the profession," and our Dental College 
represenative, Dr. N. J. Roberts, to "The Dentist's 
Views of it." Dr. B. M. Linnell, of '89 responded to 
the toast, "The Young Physician." 

Rev. Paul D. Bergen has accepted a call to the new 
Presbyterian church at South Waukegan, and with 
his family moved last Thursday to the new home on 
Tenth street, near McAllister avenue. South Wau- 
kegan is to be congradulated on its success in securing 
Mr. Bergen, and the town will be fortunate indeed, if it 
is able to retain for any length of time so able a man as 
its pastor. 

John A. Linn has abandoned his studies at McCor- 
mick Seminary and gone to California on account of his 
health. Richard Pughe and L. E. Zimmerman must 
be added to the list of L. F. U. men now in attendance 
at McCormick, bringing the members up to twenty. 
George W. Wright, although as yet but a "middler" 
at McCormick, preached twice last Sunday in his old 
home church — the Forty-First Street Presbyterian. 
Dr. John HaU occupied the pulpit the previous Sunday. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. W. G. Rainey is visiting his father in Kentucky. 

Miss Towner, of Highland Park, has been visiting 
with Mrs. Henry Cobb. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Larned and family will spend 
the winter in Pau, in the south of France. 

Mrs. Ford will give a series of ten lectures on Mo- 
dern Art at the house of Mrs. E. J. Warner. The lec- 
tures will be delivered weekly. 

The Lake Forest branch of the Needlework Guild 
of America has begun active work for the season. Mrs. 
Calvin Durand is President, and Miss Harriet Durand 
Secretary. 

Unknown to Lake Foresters generally, there was a 
wreck on the Northwestern road near the Lake Forest 
Depot last Wednesday night. A great stone was jolted 
off the fast freight about ten o'clock in front of Black- 
ler's meat market; several trucks were broken, and 
several freight cars demolished, but with the aid of the 
wrecker and a large force of workmen everything was 
cleared up by three o'clock the next morning. 



It seems that a lawyer is something of a carpenter. 
He can file a bill, split a hair, chop logic, dovetail an 
argument, make an entry, get up a case, frame an in- 
dictment, impanel a jury, put them in a box, nail wit- 
nesses, hammer a judge, bore a court, chisel a client, 
and other like things. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN I 
TEETH >> 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
ifford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are II. D, 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI <£ SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

* DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH STREET. CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.A. 

* $• $ £ $ 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



(ITfy£ Jfunb^mimt&l letter 5§oak* 

THE one among them all that survives all changes ami all opposition is Bl.ickstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it ; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooley' s work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while j'ear by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to repp its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acqui ing an intimate acquaintance wii h the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agretable introduciion. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principle s of life which animated it. And it is no'iceable also, that though 
in England, where the common law- and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and "here much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even bv way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to Ameiica, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information abou'- parliamentary legislation which in no way 



concerns us. 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9 50, PREPAID ON R"CEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 

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108 Madison Street, 



Chicago. 



W. E. RUSTON. Agent. Lake Forest. 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 

Practical 

PLUMBER * GA5 FITTER, 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Mrs. A. Williams, 

TRestauraut anfc 
Choice Confectioner?, 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER — . 



choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT 



J. G. Cornish, 



DEALER IN 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, « 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND MANUFACTURER OF 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. III. 

JSJ ORMAN J. ROBERTS, 

DENTAL 
SURGEON 



WAUKEGAN, ILL. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



marble and granite monuments, 
building stone, lime and cement, 
sewer pipe, drain tile, etc . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



ROBERT MERCER, 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
PIPES, AND 
STATIONERY. 
AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



Fred, Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

* * HARNESS, 

CARRIAGE TRIMMINGS, 

DIAWCTC _ REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE. 

BLANKETS, ETC. 

Waukegan, III. 



The W. T. Keener Co. 



PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
AND DEALERS IN 



MEDICAL and 
SCIENTIFIC 



..BOOKS 



96 Washington Street, 
Chicago. 



fjANDY 

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Send $1.25, $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box by express, 
of the best candies in America, 
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paid east of Denver. Refers to 
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ADDRESS, 

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CONFECTOINER- 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



A.H. Abbott erCo. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR COPYING 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D.,PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 

Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



a 



HICAGO 
COLLEGE 



V*^ r~*f~~\\ T IZ/^XZ THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 

LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



LAW 



OF 

faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, . CHICAGO 

79 DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J R b CO. 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS* 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to $35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



Novembej^i, 1893. 
k— 1 ^ 



No. 8 







LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. PUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 
J. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, coeducational. 6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT LALE FOREST, ILL. AT CHICAGO, ILL. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French. 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Bibical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address, 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake'Forest, III, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




i MEN S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



CJiirago's Leading Religious }\ pekly. 

Good 




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tM R io R ! Sunday 

Reading 



w. j. Root, 



HIGH ART 



Kimball Hall, 241 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

Typewriting and 
Manifolding. 

You can secure the best results. 
You can obtain more work for your money. You can 
obtain more Manifold Copies, and you will always be 
pleased by bringing your manuscript copy to me. 

A. B. BURDICK, 

College. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Purchase "^ 
Books, 

Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



BRUBAKER 

©Qrtisti® ®Pfiot©f ropfier® 

Waukegan, 111. 

NEW LOCATION. NEW ROOMS. 

NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
excelled. Prices reasonable. A trial order solicited 

Yours truly, 
126 GENESEE ST. J. H. BRUBAKER. 

jPfag delegated E^gei? 

D. R. COOVER. 

Ipbotoorapber, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building. 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 




pDMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 



MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 

flotice to Hfcvertisers. 

If for any reason you are not satisfied with 
the shape, size or position of your ad., please address 

C. B. Moore, adverti ing agent, Lake Forest, 
do not let any little grievance I'kv. above named, run along 
indefinately and make it a < ai.se or getting out of your 
contract. All that is possibk will be done to correct any 
errors. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1893 



No. 8 



CALLED IT A TIE. 



CHICAGO UNIVERSITY GAME DECLARED A 
DRAW — SCORE I 4— > 4- 

The 'Varsity team did not expect to play again be- 
fore Thanksgiving, but last Thursday afternoon Man- 
ager Bourns received a telegram from Chicago Uni- 
versity asking for a game on their grounds on Saturday, 
the iSth. The invitation was accepted, although many 
of the men were still laid up from the Evanston game, 
and the whole team rather demoralized. Stagg wanted 
revenge for the former defeat, but was unable to get it, 
for even though Lake Forest did want money, she also 
wanted "blood." 

When our team played the first game, they reached 
the grounds about 2.30, but Chicago refused to play 
until nearly 4 o'clock, and then only half-hour halves. 
Last week their manager did not advise our men at 
what time the game was to begin, so our men arrived 
at the grounds about 3 o'clock, much to Mr. Stagg's 
wrath. Capt. Hayner expected to play half-hour 
halves, but he insisted on playing 45 minutes. The 
first half was for the most part a good exhibition of 
foot-ball, although marred by several bad fumbles, 
mostly in the part of Chicago. At the end of the first 
half it was so late that our men wished to call the 
game, but as the score was 6-4 in our favor, Stagg 
would not consent to it. The second half was supposed 
to be fifteen minutes in length, and was played in al- 
most total darkness. The sun had gone down and the 
moon was covered with clouds. The only illumination 
was from the electric lights of the Midway Plaisance. 
The teams lined up as follows: 

LVKE FOREST. CHICAGO. 

Rice, Vance right end Gale, Lamay 

C. Thorn, Kellog " tackle Knapp 

H. Thorn " guard Lazier 

Hunt center VVyant, 

Moore left guard Smith, Ruhlkoeter 

Woolsey " tackle Allen 

Adams " end Sykes 

Hayner quarter Raycroft 

Dave Fales right half Nichols 

Dave Jackson left " Bliss, Lamay 

Dave Williams full back Neel 

Lake Forest won the toss and opened with a flying 
wedge for 14 yds. Jackson gained 15 yds. around right 
end but Chicago secured the ball on four downs. 
On the first play Chicago fumbled and Fales getting 
the ball ran 25 yds. for a touch down. Williams kicked 
goal — score, L. F. U. 6, U. of C. o. 

Chicago gained 12 yds. with a flying wedge but the 



ball went to L. F. on offside play. Adams made 15 
yds. around the end. Williams kicked 30 yds. and L. F. 
soon got the ball and 15 yards on a fumble. L. F. 
was now near Chicago's goal line and for fully fifteen 
minutes the battle raged fiercely close to Chicago's 
goul. Neel tried to punt but was blocked. On 
a second trial the ball was stopped but Knapp 
getting it made a run of 30 yards. Lake Forest 
was awarded the ball on four downs but it went 
back to Chicago and Neel punted 30 yards. Lake 
Forest made 10 yards on a flying wedge but lost the 
ball on a fumble, regaining it again on four downs. 
Williams punted 30 yards. Neel fumbled and Hunt 
downed it for L. F. After several gains had been 
made through the Chicago line, Jackson made 20 yards 
around the end. Chicago was given the ball near the 
center of the field and gained steadily one and two 
yards at a time until the ball was pushed across the 
line for a touch down. No goal was kicked — score 
6-4 for L. F. 

During the entire second half the exact location of 
of the ball was purely a matter of guess. The goal 
posts could not be seen from the center of the field. 

In opening, Chicago gained 30 yards in the wedge. 
The ball was lost on a fumble. Jackson gained 30 
yards and Williams ten yards for a touch down. No 
goal, — score 10-4 for L. F. 

Chicago now after a couple of plays got through in 
the darkness for a touch down. Goal, — 10-10. Wil- 
liams gained 30 yards in the flying wedge. Jackson 
ran 2^ yards for a touch down from a wedge. No 
goal, — score 14-10 for L. F. 

Stagg still thought it was light enough to play, 
though he could't find the middle of the field. Chicago 
put the ball in play and her men scattered and ran up 
the field. The L. F. men could not see where the ball 
was. Hunt however found the man with the ball be- 
fore he had fairly got started and brought him down. 
Referee Stagg was up near the goal at the time looking 
for the ball. After the ball had been called down, 
Wyant secured it by a pass forward and covered by 
darkness ran up the field and scored a touch down 
which Stagg allowed because he was not near the ball 
when it was called down. VVyant did not kick the 
goal, as Lake Forest would then get the ball and in 
dark would be sure of a touch down. By agreement 
between Stagg and Ha3'ner, the game was called with 
the score 14-14. 

Tabulated score: 



No. ol Yards Touch 

Runs. Gained. Tackles, downs 



Williams. 
Hayner. . 



■9 
o 



95 
o 



3 
H 



4 THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

Fales 9 31 3 1 wedge, Carver gaining 15 yards. Several bucks with 

Jackson id 122 7 1 gains followed when the ball was lost on four downs at 

Woolsey 4 24 7 o Waukegan's 30-yard line. Waukegan then sent 

H. Thoni 3 10 1 o Rogers for a gain of 25 yards and lost the ball by a 

C. Thorn 4 S 3 o fumble. The ball was rapidly forced down the field 

Adams 2 17 4 o and Halbert carried the pigskin across the line. The 

Rice o o 5 o second half ended with the ball in the territory of '97. 

Hunt o o 3 o Score 12-0 for '97. 

Moore o o 3 o The game was witnessed by a large crowd of 

Vance o o 1 o Waukeganites and the Freshmen girls. 

Kelloo-.. 001 o The features of the game were Baker's tackling, 

Adams' and Halbert's end runs, the bucking of Kucker 

™ , and Kellogg. 

Total 5 2 3o7 55 3 

Referee A. A. Stasis:. 

Umpire H. Goodman. BI G VICTORY FOR THE ACADEMY. 

HIGHLAND PARK CADETS PUSHED AROUND THE 
NOTES OF THE GAME. 

FIELD TO THE SCORE OF 52 TO O. 

Williams' all around playing and Hayner's tackling 

.„„ „ • ,, . t1 -r, • 1 j On Wednesday afternnon the Academy foot-ball 

weie especially noteworthy. Rice played a star game ' J 

,,„i-;i *„..„„ 1 t ..• • n 1 i. c .u c .. u \c -lj team scored what may truthfully be called a grand 

until forced to retire in the last of the first half. Hunt ■> J " 

j-j 11 , j j 1 i. 1 1 victory, over the foot-ball eleven of the North- 
did excellent work at center, and made several tackles. ■" 

j) f t xt 1 1 v j- 1 a u 1 j western Military Academy. The game took place at 

Raycroft, Neel and Knapp did the best work for J - 6 r 

ChicTo-n Highland Park, but was attended by a large delegation 

from the Academy. The Highland Park team was 

The Chicago Univ. eleven has three captains. out of practice, and was unable to do anything against 

They rank in the order named: Stagg, Raycroft, the stl - ng line of our team- wherefore a one-sided 

wyant. game and decidedly one-sided score. 

Fales was out of his element at half-back, yet play- The two teams lined up as follows: 

ed a sharp, cool-headed defensive game. His tackling highland park. lake forest. 

, . ,, , r , ,, , , , , Summers right end Kline 

is equal to that of any full-back we ever had. ° 

Measure " tackle Kennedy 

The erratic manner in which time was kept in the Teller " guard Randolph 

latter part of the game was probably due to the fact C 00 k center McKinnie 

that in the darkness the referee could not distinctly see Rosenburo- left guard Mailers 

the face of his watch. Isaacs „ tackle Taylor 

The foot-ball team are always glad to see the inter- Shoyer " end North 

est the Lake Forest gentlemen take in their games. Stokes quarter Woelfel 

We were pleased to see Mr. Fauntelroy, the lone deli. Dean right half Williams 

gate, at the game Saturday. Dixon left half Campbell 

Dymond full back Miller 

The features of the game were the running of 

FRESHMAN DEFEAT WAUKEGAN HIGH SCHOOL. Campbell and North, the hard tackling of Kline, the 

Last Friday the Freshman team played their initial goal kicking of Woelfel and the general team work 

game of foot-ball at Waukegan. and interference of the Academy. For Northwestern 

The game was called at 3:30 p. m. Waukegan Military Academy Dixon and Dymond did good work, 

opened with a wedge and gained 2 yards. Then fol- Touchdowns — L. F. A. — 9; goals, S. 

lowed two attempts around right end which failed of 

material gain. After bucks at the center the ball went , „ , ^„.„, „„ ..^„ m „ „.,^„^ 

. , „ & f , t,. - , t . , ACADEMY VS. NORTH SHORE. 
to 97 on tour downs. I he b reshman started with 

bucks for good gains and Halbert by a brilliant run L - F - A - overmatched, but the score close. 

around the end scored a touchdown. Waukegan The Academy team played a good game on the 

played another wedge with a slight gain. By a series home ground Saturday afternoon with the "North 

of bucks they carried the ball down near '97 goal. Shore" eleven, composed of athletic young men from 

After a struggle the Freshman plugged the line for re- various suburban towns between Lake Forest and 

peated gains. From the 25-yard line Adams guarded Chicago. They outweighed the Academy boys and 

well by Craigin and Carver scored the second touch- could usually break through their line whenever they 

down. Time was called with the ball in W. H. S. had the ball. A notable exception was when the Cads 

possession. Score S-o favor of '97. got the ball on downs when it was within a few inches 

The Freshman opened the second half with a of the goal line. In spite their opponents superior 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



weight, L. F. A. was in the lead until the last few 
minutes, when the North Shores secured a touchdown 
and goal, giving them the game, 16 to 12. 

The game begun with the North Shores in posses- 
sion of the ball. A flying wedge and steady, heavy 
line bucking, productive of good gain, brought the ball 
within 5 yards of goal. It was pushed over the line 
for a touchdown 4 minutes after time was called, 
goal was kicked — Score, 6-0 for North Shore. 

L. F. A. with the ball for the first time in her 
hands, played the flying wedge, protecting Campbell 
for 10 yards. The half baeks were sent against the 
line with only slight gains, until four downs lost the 
ball to the visiting team. But it was hardly more than 
in North Shore's possession when a fumble allowed 
Kennedy to fall on the ball for Lake Forest. Gilleland 
punted about 30 yards, immediately regained to North 
Shore by a single run. Small but steady gains pushed 
the L. F. A. men to within 5 yards of the goal where 
they made a strong stand, but to no avail. Perseverance 
yielded the visitors a touchdown, and no goal being 
kicked the score stood 10-0 in their favor. 

It was now L. F. A.'s turn to play with the leathern 
oval. After an opening run for 10 yards, Kennedy 
seized the preferred ball, rushed plump into the oppos- 
ing right end, summarily disposing of him and stepped 
out upon a clear field. He almost stopped in his aston- 
ishment at not being tackled, but recalled to his senses 
by Gilleland he made hasty tracks for goal before a 
good interference. Woelfel neatly lifted the ball be- 
tween the posts and the score announced itself 10-6 for 
N. S. Starr of the North Shore, and Campbell of L. 
F., were injured in the first half. 

In the second half "Gimpy" Smith took Campbell's 
place as half back. The Cad led off with 15 } ards and 
then the gains dwindled down until her opponents took 
away the Rugby on four downs. North Shore started 
on a bee-line for L. F. goal, but an awkward fumble 
spoiled the movement and Smith fell on the ball. 

The Academy halfs plunged into the solid line each 
in turn and with a final rush Miller was forced over 
the line. This touchdown and the goal, which by the 
way was as handsome a one as ever was kicked on the 
field, made the score 12-10 for L. F. A. 

North Shore started with the wedge, which they 
had worked so awkwardly throughout the game. At 
3 ft. from Lake Foiest goal they halted — halted in the 
full sense of the word. The Cad line stuck like a book- 
agent against the first rush of the opposing backs. An- 
other wild lunge was repulsed; the ball was 6 inches 
from the goal line. North Shore gathered herself to- 
gether for a final desperate chage, but to no avail. 
There was a plunge, a heave, and the North Shore 
rushers fell back. 

The pig-skin now started on a slow but steady 
journey from whence it came, but in the middle of the 
field L. F. A. "stopped never to go again." Four downs 
lost the ball to them. Their stout antagonists, aided 
by the gathering gloom, passed the left end and sailed 
behind the goal. 

The goal kick was successfully made, and Williams' 
rnshers were defeated to the tune of 16-12, "Beaten, but 
not dishonored." 



ATHLETICS. 

The question of a "three cornered league" between 
Evanston, Chicago and Lake Forest, has been agitated 
in the last few days. This would be an excellent move 
for several reasons. The question of expenses has al- 
ways bothered schools in the West, it being impossible 
to create interest enough to get large crowds. Fur- 
thermore all the leagues have been gotten up between 
colleges so far apart that the expenses of traveling were 
necessarily large. Now if a league were formed by 
the above mentioned schools the traveling expenses 
would to a large degree be done away with, and the 
numbers of the league all being in the neighborhood of 
Chicago, and having a good many friends and alumni 
in that city, a greater amount of interest would exist 
and larger crowds would result. Chicago and Lake 
Forest are neither one in anv league and Evanston has 
found that large leagues cost something, so that there 
would seem to be nothing to hinder the formation of 
such a union. 

The foot-ball team is slowly beginning to get back 
into form again. The men who were hurt are nearly 
all out at present and the team should be in good shape 
by Thanksgiving. Thorn is out again. He is playing 
tackle, thus strengthening the line and making it possi- 
ble for Rice to go back to his place at end. 

The championship of the West and North-West has 
been decided. Minnesota carried off the honors. In 
some ways the result was a surprise to many. Madi- 
son at the beginning and in the middle of the season 
seemed to have a "cinch" on the championship but for 
some reason their play deteriorated until large scores 
were run up against them. 

It seems too bad that there is to be no chance of 
comparing western and eastern foot-ball this year. 
Cornell and Minnesota were to have played Thanks- 
giving day, but according to latest reports Cornell has 
backed out. 

The members of the Champaign foot-ball team are 
suffering with a peculiar complaint. Several of the 
men are laid up witn boils. On this account their game 
with Chicago was declared off and it is doubtful if they 
will be in shape by Thanksgiving. 

A great deal of interest centers just now in the 
class teams. Each class has elected a captain and are 
practicing signals every night. Last year there were 
no games and so the feeling between the classes are 
higher than were before. 



Lake Forest has organized a glee and banjo club, 
the first in the history of that university. 

— Univ. of Chicago Weekly. 

Our contemporary is mistaken. Lake Forest has 
had such an organization for three years past. It was 
under the auspices of the Z. E. Society however, and 
so was not, strictly speaking, a University affair. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

(A Union of The Stentoe and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 

A. O. Jackson, '96, i 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 
Miss Lucia Clark, 
Miss Louise Conger, 
S. E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, ) 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 
C B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Locals 

Town 

• Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

- Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



#1.50 
.10 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

IT is to be regreeted that the preliminary 
work of the "Annual" is not being pushed 
forward with more vigor. Time is very prec- 
ious just now, and those interested ought to 
realize that fact. The Board should be elected 

and organized at once. 

* * 
* 

THAT we can play foot-ball in spite of acci- 
dents was proved by the Chicago Uni- 
versity game last Saturday. The Chicago 
team was far stronger than it was at the time 
of our first encounter, while our team was con- 
sidered weaker. It was said by some that the 
reason we won the first game with Chicago 
was because it was so early in the season that 
they were not in form. Yet the last game re- 
sulted in a virtual victory for Lake Forest. We 
congratulate the team on their good work. 

* # 
* 

A TRIPLE LEAGUE. 

THE 'plan of a triple athletic league, to be 
composed of Lake Forest, Northwestern, 
and Chicago Universities (which is suggested 
in another column) , is well worthy of consider- 
ation. There are many arguments in favor of 



such a league, and hardly one good one against 
it. The important matter of travelling ex- 
penses would be reduced to a minimum be- 
cause of the short distances separating the 
three institutions. This has been one of the 
greatest objections to the present league be- 
tween Michigan, Northwestern, Wisconsin and 
Minnesota. Travelling expenses have eaten 
up gate receipts. Again, the three schools are 
quite evenly matched. In foot-ball, at least, 
Lake Forest is fully able to keep up her end. 
As to the other branches of athletics, she can 
make a creditable showing, and will improve 
as time goes on. Neither Lake Forest or 
Chicago have been members of any " league " 
this year. One advantage of such an associa- 
tion is that a pennant furnishes an incentive 
to work, and keeps up the interest in athletics 
Let us hear what Evanston and Chicago think 
of a " three-cornered league." 



* * 

* 



NOTHING in the way of a lecture or enter- 
tainment course is provided for Lake 
Forest students. The literary societies are 
allowed one or two entertainments, but this is 
not enough to secure a series of the best 
speakers and thinkers, as is done in most pro- 
gressive institutions. In some schools the 
students organize a '' lecture association," in 
others the Y. M. C. A. takes hold of the pro- 
ject, or possibly the faculty takes up the matter. 
By thus co-operating, a series of choice enter- 
tainments are secured at absolute cost, only 
enough being charged for tickets to defray 
actual expenses. Such a plan, if introduced 
here, would leave the literary societies to gain 
their money in some other way, but would in- 
sure more high-class entertainments than we 
have at present, at little or no additional cost. 
Last year there was a plan on foot to make a 
permanent lecture fund, by diverting the Gov. 
Bross essay fund to that purpose. This the 
heirs unreasonably refused to allow, so we 
need expect no assistance from that quarter. 
But no one will deny that a course of this nat- 
ure would be most desirable. It is a little 
late to do anything this season; still there is 
time enough to make a start in the right dir- 
ection. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Miss Parker, of Kankakee, visited Miss Kenaga 
over Sunday. 

Dr. Hirsh, a former well-known Lake Forester, was 
in town recently. 

Ed. U. Henry played left guard for Cornell in the 
game with Lehigh. 

Miss Stowell, of Chicago, ex. '95, visited Miss 
Keener over Sunday. 

T. S. Jackson, 'S9, paid a hurried visit to L. F. 
friends last Wednesday. 

Mr. Neal of the Senior Class in McCormick Sem- 
inary visited Mr. Lininger on Sunday. 

Mr. H. VV. Jones, ex '94, known to us as a good 
sermonizer is now a first class married man. 

Mr. Harris, of Chicago, cared for Mr. Hayner's 
bruised feelings the day after the draw with the U. of C. 

Capt. Hayner and Mr. Hunt went into the City 
departments yesterday morning to look for some foot- 
ball enthusiasts. 

Dr. Walter Smith's paper on "Certitude" in the 
November number of Philosophical Review is worthy 
careful attention. 

Everyone should make arrangements to attend the 
Leland T. Powers entertainment at the Art Building 
next Saturday evening, 

The young ladies of the College ars insatiable; 
some call Moore, some for Sey-mour and some Mori-ette. 
— Aletheian Reformer. 

The class foot-ball teams are preparing for the fray; 
all have elected captains, and the members of teams are 
hard at work getting their signals in mind. 

Mr. Lininger is a somnabulist, but never walks. 
The other night coming out from Chicago he went to 
sleep and in this state went on to Waukegan. 

The Alhensean Society will celebrate the 17th anni- 
versary of its founding on Nov. 24. There will be a 
reunion of old members and a good time is anticipated. 

The Aletheians are revising their constitution. Six 
vears work under the present constitution have revealed 
several weak points, and some much needed additions. 

The United States Senate has decided as to whether 
the majority or the minority should rule, but the ques- 
tion considerably agitated the Senior class last week. 

Miss FitzRandolph went to the city Wednesday to 
meet her father, Rev. Allen FitzRandolph, on his re- 
turn from West Virginia to his home in Otis, Colorado. 

Ths Musical Association did not hold its meeting 
as advertised owing to the inability of the committee 
to arrange the constitution on account of Mr. Harris' 
illness. 



Miss Oberne has been called to the city several 
times lately owing to the serious illness of her brother, 
Master Will. We are glad to report that he is much 
better now. 

It has been suggested that a very good skating park 
could be made on the ground south of the college, by 
making an embankment along the sidewalks and then 
flooding the inclosure. 

The James Whitcomb Riley and Douglas Shirley 
tntertainment will be given under the auspices of the 
Aletheian instead of the Athenasan Society as wrongly 
stated in these columns last week. 

President Coulter intends visiting the High Schools 
of northern Illinois soon for the purpose of becoming 
acquainted with the school people and letting them 
know what Lake Forest can do for them. 

The latest evidence of progress is the foundation of 
a Univ. Mandolin and Guitar Club. The following is 
the distribution of parts: — Mandolins, Messrs. North, 
H. Moore, Moriette; Zithar, Rumsfield; Guitars, 
Fales, Morrison and Fortier. 

It is announced that a new bi-monthly magazine, to 
be known as the Psychological Review, will appear 
early in the coming year, with Professor J. Mark Bald- 
win, formerly of Lake Forest, now of Princeton, and 
Professor j. M. Cattell, of Columbia, as editors. 

The Freshmen girls turned out en masse to the '97 
vs. Waukegan foot-ball game, and it is rumored that 
half the glory of the victory is due to their inspiring 
presence. Their enthusiasm carried them quite beyond 
the bounds of the Rhetoric room, but alas! the}' now 
dream dreams, and see visions." 

The Aletheian program for Friday evening was as 
follows: — Vocal solo, banjo accompaniment, Miss 
Phelps; "News of the Week," Miss McLean; Paper, 
"Aletheian Reformer," edited by Misses Skinner and 
Darby. The debate was dropped on account of the 
lateness of the hour, and the exercises closed with a 
solo by Miss Keener. 

Miss Mary L. Roberts, daughter of our former 
president, Dr. W. C. Roberts, was married to Mr. 
Roswell Miller, president of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
and St. Paul Railroad on Thursday, Nov. 15th. The 
ceremony took jiilace at the home of the bride's parents' 
on Madison Avenue, New York City, and was per- 
formed by the bride's father, assisted by Dr. John Hall 
and Rev. James McCosh. The couple will spend 
their honeymoon traveling in the south in Mr. Miller's 
private car. Their home is to be in Chicago. 

At the regular meeting of the Athenian Society on 
Fridav evening, the following program was rendered: 
A declamation, very well delivered, by H. B. Cragin, 
an enjoyable reading by Wolsey, entitled "The Ava- 
lanche of Jungfrau." The reading was followed by a 
splendidly prepared and well delivered essay by J. G. 
Coulter, on "Wendell Phillips." The last number be- 
fore the debate was an interesting talk on "Incubation," 
by W. E. Rustin. The debate, "Resolved, that Bime- 
tallism is the best solution of the money question" 
was supported very ably on the affirmative by C. G. 
Smith and R. L. Roberts, ann on the negative by A. 
B. Burdick and M. K. Baker. The decision of the 
judges was for the affirmative. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



This year's week of prayer for colleges has been 
one of the best and most instructive held here. We 
have been favored with exceptional leaders. Dr. 
Coulter, Messrs. Sunday, Wells and Messer are known 
to all and need no comment. The meetings on Sunday 
and Thursday were held at the College, on Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday at the Academy and on Fri- 
day at Ferry Hall. Mr. Sunday, who was with us on 
three of the evenings, came from the Chicago Y. M. 
C. A., and with his frank, open style of speaking easily 
won his way into the thoughts and feelings of the 
student body. The meetings were well attended and 
all seemed thoughtful and many a student was brought 
to look upon life in a diffeeent light. 

We wonder if Geometry is of any practical value. 
It was long ago proved that a straight line is the shortest 
distance between two points, but the students of L. F. 
C. are still compelled to describe a parabolic cutve be- 
tween the College Hall and the Art Institute. The 
loss of time involved is a source of great annoyance to 
the students especially (?), to say nothing of the wasted 
strength and shoe-leather, and possibly, temper. The 
enormous traffic over the town bridge has obliged the 
city fathers to put down au entirely new floor, at a time 
when all the funds were needed for the Ferry Hall 
bridge. By all means let the University have a private 
bridge over its own ravine and give us one more greatly 
needed convenience in our pursuit of knowledge. — Ale- 
tlieian Reformer. 

L. F, IN THE COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Many colleges all over the country are getting the 
collections that have been on display at the World's 
Fair this past season for their own museums. Lake 
Forest is doing her share in this work. Soon Dr. 
Coulter will have in his Herbarium the best collection 
of cactus in the L^. S., with the possible exception of 
the one in St. Louis. More than that, in league with 
Northwestern and Chicago Universities we are expect- 
ing to secure in the Columbian Museum at Chicago a 
very large and scientific collection to which competent 
students in these three universities will have special 
rights and privileges. The idea of universities having 
a common meeting ground and of owning rights in 
common is a new one and we think a mark of 
progress. 

The case of the People vs. P. E. J. Prendergast 
was weighed in the balance last Friday evening in the 
Zeta Epsilon Hall. At the call of Circuit Judge Waldo 
court convened at S o'clock. The prosecuting attorneys 
were W. A. Bishop and Senior Thorn. Messrs. 
Bourns and Moriette appeared for the defendant. The 
clerk was Mr. Davis, late of the World's Fair. Doctors 
Lewis and Coolidge proved that the difference be- 
tween megalomania and insanity was the same as the 
distinction between insanity and megalomania. The 
prosecution proved the prisoner (Mr. Hayner) was 
sane, because he could tell what he had had for dinner 
the day before. "Mary Hanson" and "Mrs. Prender- 
gast" gave damaging testimony. The latter labored 
under the delusion that it was a woman's suffrage 
meeting. Mary fascinated the jury, who woke up in 
time to hear her gentle accents. Stenographer Gibson's 
reading of the testimony was a feature, owing to his 
use of the "More" system, which is tersely described as 
"the more you use it, the less yon know about it." The 
saloon at 1060 N. Halstead street also seemed lo plav an 
important part. The defendant was found guilty and 
was sentenced to perform weekly penance at Ferry 
Hall on pain of death. 



OTHER GAMES SATURDAY. 
Northwestern's pride suffered a serious, though 
probably not a fatal fall last Saturday. She sent her 
strongest team to Ann Arbor and they secured 6 
points. This would have been very well if L". of M. 
had not selfishly grabbed 72. 

Pennsylvania 50, Cornell o. 
Princeton 36, West Point 4. 
Williams 30, Amherst 12. 



THE DENTAL SCHOOL. 
The Chicago College of Dental Sugery of Lake 
Forest University, the largest school of its kind in the 
world and the only one in America that is possessor of 
its own building, opened on the evening of the 24th of 
last month, with ceremonies teeming wilh good omens. 
Dr. Coulter was present and delivered the opening ad- 
dress to the three hundred students and their friends, 
and Dr. Harland gave a historical sketch of the institu- 
tion which was very intrusting. 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Calhoun was visited by her sister on Friday. 

Miss Julie Lane, of Chicago, spent Sunday with 
Miss Welton. 

Miss Alice Baxter, of Chicago, visited Miss Robin- 
son on Tuesday. 

Miss Ella Pride, of Chicago, visited her sister 
Florence on Friday. 

Miss Kenaga was visited on Friday by Miss 
Parker, of Kankakee. 

The actions of some of the Freshmen would seem 
to indicate a desire to join the Sem. class in Psycho- 

lo gy- 

Miss Gussie Robinson, who has been visiting Miss 
Robinson for a few weeks, left Wednesday for her 
home in the East. 

One of the old girls, Miss Iena Kennedy, of 
Rib Lake, Wisconsin, spent several days at Ferry Hall 
as the guest of Miss Jessie Linsay. 

Since his most successful hunting expedition, Doctor 
Seeley's smile has been broad and genial. His latest 
is, "Oh! you ought to have seen that coon drop." 

As Miss Fleming finds it necessary to take a longer 
vacation than usual at the holidays on account of her 
health, the recital which usually comes at the last of 
the term will be put some weeks earlier. 

Although the first meetings of the Juniors proved 
a delusion and a snare and only a hay ride for that 
class resulted, the hopes of the Seniors are reviving 
and they feel confident that the secret meetings of the 
Juniors mean something. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Cards are out announcing the marriage of Miss 
Eloise Bronson, who attended Ferry Hall last year and 
in '90, to Mr. Willard C. Stuckslager, on Nov. 9th, at 
Wyoming, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Stuckslager will spend 
the winter In California and will be at home in Lisbon, 
Iowa, after the first of May. 

Scene — Room in old Academy. 

Dramatis Personea? — Prof. Smith and Sem. Seniors. 

Prof. S. — "Well, young ladies, we have been con- 
sidering the subject of association and 

Hasty entrance of Freshman bold; hat in hand; be- 
comes at once the centre of attraction. 

Silence "prolonged and unbroken." Freshman, still 
standing, looks helplessly from Prof. Smith to the 
door closed behind him. At last gasps out, "I guess Fll 
go out." 

Laughter — Giggles. When faces resume their dole- 
ful expressions, Prof. S., without smallest fraction of a 
smile, continues: 

"Let us now consider the laws of Discrimination." 

In rhetoricals, the best program of the year was 
given last Wednesday. The program was as follows: 

Roll call answered by quotations from Shakespeare. 
Piano music, ... Fanny Fowler 

Recitation, .... Nellie Dewey 

Essay, .... Lucile Chapin 

Recitation, .... Edna Ward 

Vocal music, - - - Delia .Stoddard 

Recitation, - - - Margaret Coulter 

Essay, - - - Gertrude Murdock 

Letter, - - - - - Mary Watson 

Piano music, - - - Eva Bouton 

Recitation, .... Edith Piatt 

News of week, - - - Myrth Titus 

Vocal music, - - - Vinnie Gilleland 

Paper, ... Polly Fales and May Giles 

Recitation, .... Myrth Dwelle 

Banjo music, - - Annie Lord and Jessie Linsay 

The program was very long owing to the omission 
of the previous meeting, but the numbers were all well 
rendered and Doctor Seeley expressed himself as being 
much pleased with the work Society "A" is doing. 



Mr. Newton, late of the College, intends to take a 
few studies in the Academy. 

Mr. W. Hedges has been obliged to go home on 
account of a felon on hisfingure. 

Didn't somebody say that "Kid" and "Cad" were 
synonymous lately? If so, they are real mean. 

Last week's meetings at Reid Hall were well at- 
tended by the Academy students, and proved to be a 
thorough success. 

Prof. Burnap has promised the Gen. History class 
a paper on Grecian geography in connection with the 
history of Greece. 

Our friend Mr. Gates, now in Europe, when last 
heard from, was in London and making preparation 
for a journey to Paris. 

I am happy to state that my new winter tans will 
be open to exhibition Monday, Wednesday, Thursdav, 
Friday and Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 1 2 p. m. T. A. T. 

In Vergil, after the Prof, has read Holland's Eng- 
lish translation. 

Prof. — "How do you like this translation, Mr. 
Thornton?" 

Mr. T. (agitated)— "Well,— that is— I—" 

The members of the Rhetoric class are required to 
write articles in poetic diction. A choice between 
these three subjects is allowed; an allegorical represen- 
tation of life as through a desert, an autumnal sunset, 
feelings at the close of the world's fair. 

As a note in last week's number alluding to the 
study room as a "guard house" might infer a certain 
unfairness- on the part of the faculty, we wish to state 
that no student is required there whose general stand- 
ing is So or above, except those of the first form. 

A collection of about twenty maps of Greece were 
handed to the Prof, of Gen. History Friday morning. 
A greater part of the maps were astonishingly artistic, 
especially those of Mr. Scudder's which the Prof, de- 
clared as fine as any map to which he could refer the 
class. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

There is no improvement as yet noticeable in the 
East Dormitory reading room. The magazines some- 
how don't manage to put in their appearance, and the 
only thing that attracts one's eye on entering the rooms 
is the promiscuous distribution on table and floor of 
the last month's files of the Chicago da'dy papers. 



ACADEMY LACONICS. 
Mrs. Thornton, of Canton, 111., is vtsiting her son 
at the Cottage. 

The Vergil class has had its examination upon the 
first book of the -Eneid. 



ALUMNI. 

The Rev. Thomas E. Barr has accepted the pastor- 
ate of the First Congregational Church of Kalamazpo, 
Mich. 

Arthur Stanford is seen in Lake Forest occasionally, 
making this the starting point for a bicycle jaunt of 
eighteen milts to the old homestead in Grant township, 
near Fort Hill. 

Thomas S. Jackson, who is with the Chicago law 
firm of Matz & Fisher, has just returned from a busi- 
ness tour in Wisconsin, in the interests of their client, 
the World's Fair. His old friends note Mr. Jackson's 
progress with interest and pleasure. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



"Eakins & Matthews, Attorney s and Counsellors 
at Law, Suite 423 The Temple, 184 La Salle Street? 
Chicago," is the inscription on a card just received' 
Two such vigorous thinkers and enterprising business 
men should be able to learn what the legend means: 
"Plenty of room on the top." 

An address entitled "The Peril of Our Nation 
through Illiteracy in Mora," delivered by Rev. N. 
D. Hillis, D.D., of Evanston, before the Congress of 
Missions, is being widely circulated as a supplement to 
"The Sunday School Missionary." The address is 
well worthy of this attention. Dr. Hillis is a suggestive 
thinker in the field of Social Science. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Miss Davis is visiting Mrs. Gorham for the winter. 

New water pipes are being laid from the front of 
Mr. Rainey's place around to the new house of Mr. 
Fauntleroy. 

Miss Mary Dwight is now a business manager of 
the Ogontz Mosaic, which is pablished monthly at 
Ogontz School. 

The Northwestern Road is macadamizing the 
hitherto unpaved section between the west platform 
of the station and the city pavement. 

There will shortly be given in Lake Forest a series 
of three chamber concerts. The concerts are to be 
ur.der the direction of Mr. Ludwig Marum, the well- 
known Chicago violinist, and consist of the best vocal 
and instrumental music. 

The Boys Goodwill Club, of Lake Forest will soon 
have larger and more commodious quarters. Through 
the efforts of Prof. Bridgeman, the president of the 
elub, and several of the young ladies of the town, a 
considerable amount of contributions have been secured. 
With these contributions the promoters of the enter- 
prise have been able to rent two rooms and furnish 
them with the necessary accessories of a boys club. 
They are in what is known as the old hotel building, 
and will be open every night in the week as reading 
and social rooms. This is a great improvement over 
the old room in the council chamber, and those inter- 
ested in the club are deserving of high regard for their 
efficient efforts and their success. 

The verdict given by the jury at the inquest over 
the body of Charles Martin was that "He came to his 
death by being struck by a railroad train." Charles 
Martin has been known for many years in Lake Forest 
and was a member of the firm of Martin & Freil, sign 
painters and decorators. Tuesday night, Nov. 14th, he 
was in Waukegan, and having missed the 9:40 train 
to Lake Forest, started to walk home, probably, how- 
ever, later in the evening. Wednesday morning, 
about half-past three, the crew of a freight train dis- 



covered his dead body one mile south of South Wau- 
kegan with several bones broken and a great gash in 
the back of his head. The train brought the body to 
Lake Forest. An inquest was held the same afternoon 
and was continued till Thursday in hope for more evi- 
dence. No more than that just given was forthcoming 
and the verdict was given as above. The funeral was 
held Friday morning, Dr. McClure conducting the 
exercises. 

The following is the announcement of the Art 
Institute of Lake Forest for the season of 1S93-94. It 
has been decided that the main topic for the coming 
year shall be Dramatic Art. Arrangements are practi- 
cally completed for the following papers and readings. 
Dramatic Art— Mr. A. E. Barron, Dramatic Critic of 

the Inter-Ocean. 
Greek Drama — Prof. Frank B. Tarbell, of Chicago 

University. 
Reading from "Antigone," (Plumptre's Translation), 

Mr. George Riddle, of Cambridge, Mass. 
Latin Drama — Prof. Lewis Stuart. 
French Drama — Prof. A. Hennequin, of Detroit. 
Contemporaries of Shakspere — Prof. J. J. Halsey. 
Educational Influence of the Drama — Prof. W. R. 

Bridgman. 
It is also expected that papers on Shakspere, the Later 
English Drama, and one or two other topics will be 
given, and the Committee is in Correspondence with 
Prof. Swing and others in regard to the matter. They 
hope to secure Prof. R. G. Moulton, of Chicago Uni- 
versity, for his lecture on Job. Two Musical Enter- 
tainments will be given during the year, and perhaps a 
reading of some play by members of the Club. The 
first meeting was held Tueseay evening, Nov. 14th, at 
the home of Mrs. J. H. Dwight, where the first lecture, 
that by Mr. A. E. Barron, was delivered. Music was 
furnished by Mrs. Gorton and Miss Davis, and after 
the program the usnal refreshments were served. The 
President of the Art Institute this year is Prof. M- 
Bross Thomas, Prof. McNeill continuing as Secretary 



EXCHANGES. 

WE FAVOR IMMIGRATION. 

Who builds de railroads and canals, 

But furriners? 
Who helps across de street de gals, 

But furriners? 
Who in de caucus has der say, 
Who does de votin' 'lection day, 
And who discovered U. S. A., 

But furriners? 



—Ex 



HORSE POWER. 

'Tis strange, to say the least, 

In this advancing hour, 
The grinding mill of college 

Is still run by horse power. 

— Brunonian. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN I 
TEETH >> 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
ifford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
'eeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

"DENTAL SURGERY 



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& 9 $ * $ 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



''THE -UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is air outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never- been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsolete and irrevalentj. rtdtes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
Slates, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." ■ - 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooley's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its templing 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

" Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
m-iv neveriheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
hs like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greally changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even bv way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 



corcerns us. 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS $9 SO, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 

STT IO"RNJTS P resentm g Mis a d- w iH be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

The Model Clothing House, 



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Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats tf* Furnishing Goods. 

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W. E. RUSTON. Agent Lake Forest 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THOS. F. HOWE, 



Practical 



PLUMBER ^ GAS FITTER, 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALTY. 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRestauraut anfc 

"*" "" Choice Confectionery 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER _m. 



choice Confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



J. G. Cornish, 



DEALER IN 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, s 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND MANUFACTURER OF 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. III. 



N ORMAN J. ROBERTS, 



DENTAL 
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OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 



WAUKEGAN. ILL. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
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COAL 



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MARBLE and granite monuments, 
building stone, lime and cement, 
sewer pipe, drain tile, etc. . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, III. 



ROBERT MERCER, 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, 
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AGENT FOR ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
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scientific •• L*v^v>rrvo 

96 Washington Street, 
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BLANKETS, ETC. 

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ADDRESS. 

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212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



A.H.ABB0TT&C0. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
ART NOVELTIES, STUDIES FOR C3.VIN 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. 0. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 7 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B. 

ROOMS 1501-4 UNITY BUILDING, CHICAGO. 

79 DEARBORN STREET. ^ 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE. J R ft CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MENS' 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS, 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantites except the 

commonplace. 



The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 

Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to 335 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers (Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

IN. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 



Vol. VII. 



November 2<S, 1893. 
> 1 ^ 



No. Q 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. PUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co educational. 6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. AT CHICAGO. ILL. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work ami fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years o{ 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (ij Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, ('n)Chem 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14I Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



Chicago's Leading Religions Weekly. 

Good 

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Reading 

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Kimball Hall, 243 Wabash Ave., 
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MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

Typewriting and 
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You can secure the best results. 
You can obtain more work for your money. You can 
obtain more Manifold Copies, and you will always be 
pleased by bringing your manuscript copy to me. 

A. B. BURDICK, 

College. LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



your 



Purchase n 

Books, 



Candies, Stationery, and Novelties at the 
College Book Store, and save your money 
thereby. Nothing but a first-class line of 
goods kept in stock. 

Rice Bros. 

Proprietors. 



BRUBAKER 

®(3rtisti@ ®Pfi©t®f ropfier® 

Waukegan, III. 

NEW LOCATION. NEW ROOMS. 

NO BETTER LIGHT IN AMERICA. 
FINEST STUDIO IN LAKE COUNTY. 

I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not 
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D. R. COOVER. 

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FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

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yOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

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21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 




Dr. JOHN HENRY BARROWS GREAT HISTORY 



or 



of the THE WORLD'S 

PARLIAMENT 

RELIGIONS 



In Two Volumes— 700 Pages each. The only official, reliable, full 
and authentic report of the most notable congress of modern times. 

A. HABERLI, AGENT FOR LAKE FOREST 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1893 



No. 9 



HOW TO STUDY. 



BY THE DEAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS, 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. 



Aristotle says in his ' Ethics ' that men become 
players of the harp by playing on the harp, and masons 
by doing the work of masons, but he is very careful 
not to say that thus they become as a matter of course 
respectively good harpers and good masons. In other 
words, the maxim that we learn to do a thing by doing 
it is not the whole truth, for in that case there would 
be no need of teachers, and the world would have no 
bunglers and dunces, or at the most very few. There 
is an art of studying as there is an art of teaching, and 
there are certain principles that are common to both. 

I suspect that there are many good students who 
would be better students and some indifferent who 
would be fair in their work, did they know and apply 
some of the principles which I shall try to set forth. 
Studying, like every other serious pursuit, to be suc- 
cessfully prosecuted must be regarded as a business. It 
should occupy the first place in the student's mind and 
thought. The good student, like the good business 
man, fits all his other occupations and his recreations to 
the demands and opportunities of his work. This 
means that the successful student is systematic in the 
use of his time and strength. But he is systematic also 
in the way in which he does his studying. If there are 
four lessons to get in the interval of twenty-four hours 
he will not spend half an hour on one and leave it half 
done and take up the next for another half hour, but 
each lesson will receive its due share of time in some 
fixed order, and one task will usually be completed be- 
fore another is begun. The only wholesome exception 
to this rule is made when the mind wearied with the 
effort expended upon some difficult piece of work must 
turn to another occupation for the relief and rest of 
some of some of its faculties, as, for example, when a 
student turns to Greek or German to get a respite from 
problems in Mathematics or in Physics. Closely allied 
to this regard for system is the effort to concentrate the 
powers of the mind upon the subject in hand. A man 
may be systematic in the arrangement of his work and 
yet fail of accomplishing a great deal if he allows his 
mind to be easily diverted and to dawdle. Recalling 
the experiences of my own college life, I am inclined 
to think that desultoriness and dawdling are the two 
besetting sins of the student at his work. One hour of 
concentrated and close study is worth more than three 
hours of a listless and interrupted poring over books 
with the wits wool-gathering. Concentrated study 



begets the habit of a trained mind that later becomes 
an invaluable possession to the man in the conduct of 
the affairs of life. What men need first of all to carry 
on the business of life successfully is a thoroughly trained 
mind, whose faculties will easily bend to the work to 
be done, without flinching, without impatience, without 
weariness, " ohne hast, ohne rast." And this is the 
priceless gain of a discipline in which the studend bends 
the sinews of his mind to the task that is before him 
until it be achieved. The mental habit that is formed 
by grappling with a hard problem is worth more to the 
student than is represented by its solution. The intel- 
lectual tussle produces mental grip. 

A third condition of success in the work of the stu- 
dent is the right use of proper tools. I am disposed to 
think that most students have too few books to work 
with. Aside from ordinary text-books, a student should 
provide himself, if possible, with books of reference and 
illustration. An English dictionary, a manual of Eng- 
literature, a general history, and a good atlas are the 
most indispensable aids. Of course for the study of 
each branch of learning there will be needed special 
books of reference bearing directly upon the science to 
be learned. But the habit of freely consulting books of 
reference and of collateral reading cannot be too highly 
recommended. A great deal of what we learn fails of 
being impressed upon the mind so as to become a per- 
manent part of our mental fibre simply because it is 
learned without reference to its relations to other things. 
How often History and Literature are stripped of all 
life and meaning because thev are not studied in their 
environment and relation. I know of a student who 
oece tried to learn the history of the Peloponnesian war 
without taking the trouble to know the date of its oc- 
currence or the location of any one of the places men- 
tioned in this scene of conflict. Of course this history 
had no meaning or interest to him. While study is to 
be the business of the student it should never be done 
as a mere task and in a perfunctory way. Too often a 
student simply 'gets his lesson;' — the lesson should get 
him ! One of the chief defects, as it seems to me, in our 
whole system of college work, lies in this prevalent 
habit of being content with simply doing the appointed 
task. 

Nothing does more to stimulate and fructify the in- 
tellectual life than the voluntary study, the self-appointed 
search," the leisurely reading, that is suggested to thf 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



student by his teacher, or by his own interest in his 
pursuit of knowledge and truth. To take upon one- 
self too many hours of presciibed study, or by any 
other occupation to cut oneself off from the great de- 
light and priyilege of this spontaneous pursuit of learn- 
ing, is one of the greatest mistakes a student can make 
— a mistake, I fear, that is often made in the effort to 
carry too many hours of regular work in order to cut 
short the time of undergraduate study. 

Finally, the question how to study should in part 
answer itself. While studying dues not of itself make 
a good student, enthusiasm for study is likely to lead 
one far on in the right path. To cultivate this enthu- 
siasm, a college atmosphere — the air of quiet and de- 
lightful study — is a great help. Few are the places 
where this enthusiasm can be so easily cultivated as at 
the University of Michigan, where amid academic 
shades and peaceful walks, stway from the tumults and 
distractions of a large city, all his surroundings and 
associations invite the student to hold delighiful converse 
with nature and with books. — From The Inlander. 



THE YALE-HARVARD GAME. 

The greatest foot-ball game of the year, between 
Harvard and Yale, took place last Saturday, at Hamp- 
den Park, Springfield. Mass. Over 25,000 people 
witnessed the exciting struggle, which resulted in a 
victory for Yale by a score of 6-0. ' For three years Yale 
has had an unbroken series of football victories. The 
game was won by fierce, hard playing at critical points, 
reinforced by good generalship. Their defeat was a 
great surprise to Harvard, as they were full of con- 
fidence, and their team was apparently the stronger. 
In the first part of the game, Yale had the advantage 
of a strong wind, and frequently resorted to punting, 
thus saving their strength. Harard's opening plays 
and mass interference were better than Yale's, but when 
the latter were in possession of the ball they played a 
quicker game than Harvard, making three rushes in 
the time their opponents took for one. Neither side 
scored in the first half. Yale, with Butterworth's 
kicks, aided by the strong wind, acted entirely on the 
defensive, and allowed the Harvard men to tire them- 
selves out. 

In the second half, Capt. Hinkey's men went in 
with a desperate determination to win which could not 
be resisted. The wind had died away and there was 
little kicking during the remainder of the game. The 
heavy plunging of Yale's backs, Thorne, Armstrong 
and Butterworth especially, secured the single touch- 
down, from which goal was kicked. 

The game was a clean one throughout, being en- 
tirely free from slugging. Capt. Waters was the only 
man injured. He had to retire during .the Last half, 
and thereby caused the Harvard team to loose confi- 
dence. The team work of both teams was good. The 
game is characterized as a vindication of the old style 
of play of rapid, repeated line bucking, contrasted with 
the more ingenious tactics followed by the Harvard 
players. 



OUR COLLEGE PAPER 

There are certain difficulties in running a college jour- 
nal which, perhaps, may not be apparent to all without 
reflection, and a few facts may be of interest. In the 
first place The Stentor is issued in the interests of 
the students and the University, and is dependent upon 
them for its support. And second, although its past 
history has shown that it is not a money-making scheme, 
nevertheless the paper can and ought to be made self- 
supporting. 

Although issued for our students, alumni and friends, 
only about half our students and less than a third of the 
alumni subscribe. It is obvious that more students 
should subscribe. Some may think that there is a halo 
of glory hanging over those that workon a college paper 
but the general sentiment of all concerned is that it is 
more work than glory. When two years ago The Sten- 
tor was issued once in two weeks at the present subscript- 
ion price, the management was not so difficult, but 
when issued every week for the same money it is 
quite another matter. The subscriptions remain about 
the same, but the work and the cost are both doubled. 

It costs one hundred and twenty-five dollars a month 
to run a paper like The Stentor, and its only sources 
of income are subscriptions and advertising. As no 
advertising can be collected before Tanuary or Febuary, 
is necessitates that all expenses until that time must be 
met by money from subscriptions. If subscriptions 
were paid in promptly all would be well. But rig'tit 
here is a needless difficulty, for it has been our obser- 
vation and experience for two years that such is not 
the case. It is the exceptional student that pays his 
subscription without being asked. And it would seem 
as though the majority thought that their subscription 
to the paper was the last bill that they need to pay; 
that somehow the paper could run either upon the 
credit of the Company or that of the University, or 
perhaps upon the ingenuity of the manager in procrast- 
insting the payment of bills. Many too, seem to think 
they can pay their subscription any time during the 
year. This is shameful negligence and for the most 
part inexcusable. It is unfair to the paper and unfair 
to those trying to make it a success. A subscription to 
The Stentor should be considered by every student 
as an honest debt to be paid as soon as possible. Such act- 
ion is a duty incumhent upon us all if we have the best 
interests of our student life and University at heart. 

A. P. Bourns. 



ATHLETICS. . 

On Tuesday last, a piece, with large head lines, 
appeared in the Herald concerning the formation of a 
three cornered league advocated in last week's paper. 
A committee should be appointed by the athletic assoc- 
iation to investigate the matter and if possible to get 
Chicago and Evanston to join with us in this move- 
ment. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The Armour Institute, although a new school, has 
started out well in athletics. They had a good foot- 
ball team and now at the end of the foot-ball season 
have organized a hare and hounds club. Their first 
run was to take place last Saturday and there is to be 
one every two weeks. We would do well to form a 
similar club. During the winter the only exercise we 
get is indoors, with the exception of a little uncertain 
skating. Now if there was a hare and hounds club a 
man could put on some good warm clothes, and wheth- 
er there was snow on the ground or not could take a 
run of an hour or so and thus get his lungs cleared and 
his waste tissue worked off. 

The Minnesota foot-ball team broke training for 
the season, last week. Their athletic association ended 
the season five hundred dollors in debt. This shows 
the disadvantage of belonging to a league the numbers 
of which are separated by long distances. Our athletic 
association will come out ahead this fall and they are 
to be congratulated for it, as they are one of a lucky 
few. 

During the past cold weather the team has been out 
in the field every night practicing signals. This is a 
good way to toughen the men, but it seems as though 
the team might do the work indoors, especially as we 
have a good gymnasium for such work. 

The foot-ball team goes to Champaign Thanksgiv- 
ing day. It is rather hard to go away from home on 
that day, but we do want to play Champaign. There 
has been a good deal of talk the last two years about 
which team was the better and we want to see it setled. 



OTHER GAMES SATURDAY. 

University of Illinois, 26, Purdue, 26. 

University of Michigan, 22, University of Kansas, o. 

Lehigh 34, University of No. Car. o. 
Among the games to be played on Thanksgiving are: 

Yale vs. Princeton ; Harvard vs. Universtiy of Penn- 
sylvania; Chicago University vs. Michigan University; 
Chicago A. C. vs. Boston A. C; Leland Stanford Uni- 
versity vs. University of California. 



BIOLOGICAL CLUB. 

The second meeting of the Biological Club Friday 
afternoon was interesting and well attended. The pro- 
gram consisted of three topics, the first being a talk by 
Mr. L'line on "The Cactus Family." He reviewed the 
details of the preparation leading up to the Revision of 
Cactacecv, now under way, following with a discussion 
of many of the peculiar characters so prevalent in that 
family, using herbarium specimens as examples. 

Mr. John G. Coulter reviewed a recent article in 
the Popular Science Monthly, entitled " Disease in the 
Apple Barrel," by Byron D. Halsted. Many of the 
common fungus diseases of the Apple, together with 
their external manifestations, were described, and illus- 



trated by actual specimens, thereby rendering it an ex 
ceedingly interesting review. 

Professor Locy presented a partial discussion of an 
extensive paper by Dr. Hodge on "Optic Changes in 
Nerve Cells due to Functional Activity." It had been 
shown, he said, that there are certain changes which 
occur in all living cells after performing their function, 
— such changes, e. g., as cell and nucleal shrinkage and 
extrusion of granular contents. Dr. Hodge's paper 
shows that in cells of nerve tissue there are found to be 
visible changes — visible by microscopical means — as a 
result of functional activity. 

Professor Locy also initiated the plan of presenting 
a series of short sketches of eminent scientific men by a 
reminiscent talk about Dr. Oscar Hartvvig, the famous 
embryologist of the L T niversity of Berlin. This will 
be made an additional feature of future programs. 

The next meeting will occur Thursday, December 
14, in Professor Locy's laboratory at 3 p. m., to which 
such students as are interested in Biology are invited. 



EXTINCT MONSTERS. 

Oh, had I lived in the good old days, 

When the Ichthyosaurus ramped around — 

When the Elasmosaur swam the bays 

And the Sivatherium pawed the ground; 

Would I have spent my precious time 

At weaving golden thoughts in rhyme? 

When the Tinoceras snooped about 

And the Pterodactyl Happed its wings — 

When the Brontops with the warty snout 
Moseyed around for herbs and things: 

Would I have bothered myself o'ermuch 

About divine afflatus and such? 

The Dinortherium flourished then, 

The Pterygotus lashed the seas; 
The Rhamphorynchus prospered when 

The Scaphognathus pearched in trees; 
And every creature, wild or tame, 
Rejoiced in some rococo name, 

Pause and ponder; who could write 

A triovlet or roundelay, 
While a Megatherium vawped all night 

And a Hesperornis yawped all day; 
While, now and again, the bray sonorous 
Of Glyptodon Asper swelled the chorus? 

If I'd been almost anything 

But a poet, I might have got along; 

Those extinct Monsters of hoof and wing 
Were not conductive to lyric song; 

So nature reserved this tender bard 

For the kindlier Age of Pork and Lard. — Ex. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
VV. B. Hunt, '94, ) 

A. O. Jackson, '96, > 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 

Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 
Miss Lucia Clark, ( 
Miss Louise Conger, i 
S E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, S 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 

Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

Aletheian 

Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$1.50 

.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, III., as second-class matter. 

WE are pleased to announce that Mr. David 
Fales, Jr., has been appointed assistant 
editor-in-chief of The Stentor, and will as- 
sume his duties with the next issue. Matter 
for publication way be handed either to him or 

the editor-in-chief. 

* * 
* 

DURING the past few weeks our space has 
been almost entirely occupied with foot- 
ball reports and local news. After next week 
we shall have room to devote to other sub- 
jects, and in this connection we renew our in- 
vitation for literary contributions, in prose or 
verse. Comments on current topics will be 
welcomed, or discussion of any matters of gen- 
eral interest. The outside world wants to know 
what Lake Forest students can do besides 
play foot-ball. While not primarily a literary 
paper, The Stentor does not wish to neglect 

that feature. 

# * 
* 

THIS week the annual American festival of 
Thanksgiving is celebrated. The average 
American college student mingles a great many 
thoughts of foot-ball with his prayers of thanks- 
giving on that day, for East and West, it is the 
time set apart by the colleges for their great 
final struggles. It is to be hoped, however, 



that the college world will not allow all ideas of 
the original purpose of the day to be swallowed 
up in speculations concerning "drop kicks" 
and " Deland tricks." Here at Lake Forest 
we have much for which to be thankful. One 
year ago, Dr. McClure, in a brief article direct- 
ed the attention to the broader outlook and 
better equipment of the University as compar- 
ed with 1891. The cheerful tone of his re- 
marks was qualified only by reference to the 
fact that we were then without a president. 
This year all that he said in praise of L. F. U. 
holds with doubled force, with a strong addi- 
tional note of thanks, caused by the fact that 
the University now has at its head one of the 
most progressive and enlightened educators 
in the land and a man of great executive 
ability. 

Our professional schools are in splendid 
condition. The Law department reports a 
largely increased attendance. Rush Medical 
is thriving and the Dental college has a fine 
new building, perfectly adapted to their pur- 
pose; while the Seminary is as prosperous as 
usual. The college students are thankful for 
more class rooms, a larger and stronger faculty 
and an unsurpassed curriculum. These are 
only a few of our blessings, but they serve to 
emphasize the time honored exhortation of the 
day, "Let us give thanks." 



* * 
* 



A UNIVERSITY BUTTON. 

A NEED which has been expressed before 
is that of a "University button," to be 
worn as a recognition badge by all members 
of the University, irrespective of departments. 
The Law school and the Medical department 
have each adopted neat buitons, and the Sem- 
inary boasts an ornamental pin, but we have 
no generally accepted University emblem. 
Here is an opportunity for some one to show 
their skill in design. It goes without saying 
that such an emblem should display the Uni- 
versity colors, and in addition it would be de- 
sireable to indicate the department of the 
wearer. The present Law school button is 
very neat and perhaps could not be greatly 
improved. The Stentor will be glad to re- 
ceive designs as above indicated, and have 
them passed upon by a committee. Simplicity 
and beauty are the two requisites, and we hope 
to see an effective combination. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Foster, U. of Illinois, 'S9, is engineering the new 
Seminary bridge. 

The Athenian Society is at present engaged in re- 
vising its constitution. 

The University Club met last Thursday evening at 
the home of Prof. Thomas. 

Miss Alice Keener was pleasantly surprised by a 
call from ner father Suuday evening a week ago. 

Prof. Schmidt has added to the library a large 
number of critical and historical works on German lit- 
erature. 

Miss Oberne's brother aud sister made her a delight- 
ful call Friday evening. Miss Edith remained over 
Saturday. 

Every one who could rake up a pair of skates of 
any kind last week, got out and took advantage of the 
good ice. 

Mr. Halbert, of the Freshman class, was confined 
to his room for several days during the past week by 
sickness. 

It begins to look as though the class foot-ball 
games would fall through this year as last, by the early 
advent of winter. 

Some of the rooms in the old Academy building are 
uncomfortably chilly on these cool mornings. Couldn't 
a little more steam be turned on ? 

E. H. McNeal, '95, who was expecting to return to 
school after the holidays, now says he will not be able 
to come back at all this year. 

Chas. Thorn and Woolsey have both been badly 
laid up since the Chicago game. Thorn will not be able 
to play again this year. Woolsey will be out for the 
Champaign game. 

W. D. McNary, '93, who is now a Junior at Rush 
Medical, spent Saturday and Monday afternoons train- 
ing with the foot-ball team, in preparation for the 
Thanksgiving game. 

The price of single copies of The Stentor has 
been reduced to 5 cents. Those desiring extra copies 
to send to their friends can alwavs obtain them upon 
application to the Business Manager. 

The special features of the Aletheian meeting Fri- 
day evening were the piano solo by Miss Hodge and 
the readings by the Misses Brown and McClanahan. 
The society prides itself upon its talent in these lines. 

Prof. Locy lectured on the origin of sense organs 
before the Biological Club of Chicago Univ., Wednes- 
day, Nov. 22. He gave the results of his recent re- 
searches on the sense organs of vertebrated animals. 

Three gentlemen from Rush Medical were out one 
night last week practicing with the foot-ball team. 
They were Messrs. Rogers, McNabb and Palmeter. 
The latter will probably accompany the team to Cham- 
paign. 



The Thanksgiving vacation will be of the usual 
length in the College this year. At the Seminary and 
Academy, however, the recess will be of short duia- 
tion, the recitations beginning again on Friday after- 
noon. 

Friday, the 24th inst., was the coldest November 
day experienced in this part of the country in twenty 
years. The lowest registered point dnring the day was 
two degrees below zero, and the highest twelve above 
zero. 

So far our reading-room has cost us $50.05. The 
following is an official statement of where the cash 
came from: From the sale of periodicals, $17. So; sub- 
scriptions from faculty, $14.00; subscriptions from stu- 
dents, $18.25. 

Prof. Stuart's class in Horace have been entertained 
several times of late by a display of amateur theatricals. 
The acting of Miss Brown in the star parts would be a 
revelation to the most enthusiastic admirers of the 
dramatic art. 

One of the rooms in the basement of the Art 
building, just across the hall from Prof. Stuart's recita- 
tion room, is being furnished with a table and book 
shelves and will be used as a library for Greek and 
Latin works. 

The L. F. A. Musical Association is now under a 
constitution adopted at a meeting of those interested 
last Thursday evening. Officers will be elected at the. 
next meeting. The Banjo and Guitar Club, under Mr. 
Harris' leadership, met for preliminary work last 
Wednesday evening. 

Prof. Halsey's class in economics spent their time 
on Monday and Tuesday in a discussion of the tariff 
question. Many able arguments were brought out on 
both sides; however, no one seemed to feel that the 
problem had really been satisfactorily solved. 

The foot-ball team will leave for Champaign 
Wednesday afternoon. The following players and 
substitutes will take the trip: Adams, Woolsey, Moore, 
Hunt, H. Thorn, Rheingans, Rice, Hayner (Captain), 
D. H.Jackson, Lee, Fales, McNary, Palmeter. Vance, 
Reinhart, Gilleland, C. Thorn, Williams. 

At the monthly meeting of the Board of Directors 
of the Athletic Assoeiation, last Thursday evening, a 
committee consisting of Goodman, Moriette and Camp- 
bell, was appointed to get up a benefit entertainment 
to be given shortly after the "semi-annuals," i. e., about 
Feb. 10th. Some special rights and privileges were 
also voted, which, it is to be hoped, will make it some- 
thing of an honor to be a University athlete, viz., that 
a 'Varsity foot-ball player have the option of retaining 
his suit when he graduates, and that none but a mem- 
ber of a 'Varsity team or a representative track athlete 
wear "L. F." on his sweater. 

We have listened to two very interesting chapel 
talks during the past week; one by Prof. Halsey on 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



"Industrial Peace," as illustrated by the recent settle- 
ment of the miner's strike in England; the other by Dr. 
Coulter, explained the functions of that body of men so 
powerful in educational matters, the "Council of Ten," 
elected bv the National Educational Association for 
tha purpose of outlining uniform requirements in sec- 
ondary schools. The report of this Council, which 
will be made next July, is expected to mark an epoch 
in secondary education. 

We have been wondering if some soi t of temporary 
foot bridge could not be put over the ravine between 
the College and Art Building. As long as tho weather 
is fair it is not so very hind to get across the ravine, but 
when it is damp or slippery, the task becomes both 
difficult and dangerous. It would seem that a light 
bridge, fastened on cables, could be swung for a small 
outlay of money, while the benefit to all concerned 
would be very great. For one going from one build- 
ing to another by the road, it is almost impossible to 
avoid being late to rocitations. 

The regular literary program of the Zeta Epsilon 
Society at its last meeting was exceptionally good. It 
was as follows: Debate, "Resolved that the theatre is a 
detriment to American youth;" for the affirmative, W. 
D. Gibson and J. H. Rice; for the negative, D. I. Jones 
and F. S. Mellen. The judges decided two for the neg- 
ative and one for the affirmative. A Thanksgiving 
number of the "Jocunda Aura," the Society paper, was 
edited by J. VV. Currens and T. F. Marshall. A pleas- 
ing impromptu speech by H. W. Harris on a " Picture 
of Canaseraga, and a talk on the " Negro " by D. D. 
Lewis, concluded the program. 

Friday evening was a night of rejoicing for the 
Athenian Society. It was the seventeenth anniversary 
of the Society, and it was celebrated by a gathering of 
the alumni with the active members. The program 
was informal and made up of reminiscent talks by the 
old fellows, together with an opening address by Harry 
Goodman and closing remarks by A. O. Jackson. Thei-e 
talks were all very pleasing and interesting, and intense- 
ly so were those of Messrs. Jack, Boggs and V\ ilson. 
Light refreshments weie served, and after the speeches 
everyone went in for a "high old time." Nearly every- 
one took a hand in the well-known game — an institu- 
tion of the Society — which has caused man}' a brave 
fellow to take his meals standing. Old songs and new 
were sung with a vim, and the Virginia Reel was intro- 
dnced with many new and startling figures. It was a 
late hour when the meeting broke up, and everyone re- 
tired with the declaration that he had never enjoyed a 
better time. Letters of regret were read, all expressing 
best wishes for the Society, from Keyes Becker, F. C. 
Sharon and L. E. Zimmerman. The following is a li^t 
of the alumni who were present: 



A. E. Jack, 
T. D. Stanley, 
E. M. Wilson, 
E. S. Wells, 
R. C. Robe, 
A. S. Wiison, 
W. E. Pratt, 
W. D. McNary, 
L. N. Rossiter, 



J. H. McVay, 
W. E. Danfbrth, 
Aubrey Warren, 

D. H. Williams, 

E. G. Wood, 

F. M. Skinner, 
N. H. Burdick, 
R. H. Crozier. 



LELAND POWERS' ENTERTAINMENT, 

On Saturday evening, under the auspices of the 
Zeta Epsilon Society, at the Art Building, Leland T. 
Powers, the famous impersonator, delighted a good- 
sized audience with his wonderfully realistic imperson- 
ations of the characters of "David Coppenfiold." Un- 
aided by scenery or costumes, he successfully repro- 
duced the great-hearted Pegotty, the cringing Uriah 
Heep, the manly David, the bombastical Mr. Micawber, 
and the rest. After having wrought his audience up 
to an intense pitch of excitement, the speaker restored 
them to a normal frame of mind by a charming little 
sketch entitled "Pro and Con." The entertainment 
was pronounced one of the best ever given in Lake 
Forest. 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Elizabeth Whitely, of Granston, spent Friday 
with Miss Norton. 

Even the detective profession is not safe from the 
invasion of women. Enquire of Miss Darby for fur- 
ther information. 

On Monday eve, Miss Fleming gave a short address 
and some practical hints on Physical Culture, in the 
chapel. Her remarks are always interesting and of 
much profit to her pupils. 

The marriage of Miss Gertrude Ellis, '90, to Mr. 
George Scofield took place at the house of the bride's 
parents, Oconto, Wis., Tuesday evening, November 21. 
Mr. and Mr. Scofield will spend the winter in Cali- 
fornia. 

Where curiosity is concerned, the Seniors are there 
every time. About a week ago, a Junior could not get 
by a Senior without being asked, " Oh, what are you 
going to give us?" " When is it coming off?" — refer- 
ring of course to the tea, which was not yet announced. 
Our big sisters, all things come to those who wait. 

In a recent talk we were told that we must not ex- 
pect to satisfy our "lower tastes" and stand up to se 
a foot-ball game, but must sit upon the floor of the 
grand stand, chairs being lacking, and try to spv out a 
few interesting points of the game over the heads of 
the other people. Therefore, we attend no more 
games. 

The young ladies are very grateful to Miss Norton 
for a most pleasant time on Friday evening. She 
planned and helped in the preparation of some char- 
ades, which were followed bv tableaux illustrating 
parts of Tennyson's " Elaine," read by Miss Robinson. 
Other tableaux followed; and it was altogether one of 
the most delightful evenings spent in Ferry Hall. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 9 

Miss Elizabeth A. Buell, '90, was married to Mr. Sonata No. 2, — For Four Hands, - Weber 

H. C. Patterson of Chicago, Wednesday evening, No- Misses Read and Harris, 

vember 22. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A Roya , p rin cess, - Christina G. Rossetli 

S. J. McPherson. It was a chrysanthemum wedding. ... ,-, . D , 

J ... Miss Gertrude rate. 

The bride wore an iS;o gown of white satin with TT T ,, r ,. , . . 

b He Loves Me, - L hail wick 

duchess lace; lilies of the valley were fastened to her 

11 -i 01 • j i_ • j , U i at j -kit Miss Rosalind Brown, 

tulle veil. She carried bride roses. When Mr. and Mrs. 

Patterson return from their wedding trip, they will re- *>■ Lark's Morning Song, Koelling 

side at No. 6525 Oglesby avenue. They will receive b - Feu Follet, - Jungmann 

on Fridays after January 5. Miss Gertrude Pate. 

a. Abschied, ) 

Ferry Hall always celebrates two Thanksgiving b. Schneeflocken, \ - - Hoffmann 

days, one differing from the other in that it comes on a c. Etude, - - - Heller 

fixed date — November 21. The old girls remembered d. Irrlichtei, Jensen 

that Monday was Dr. Seeley's birthday and the new Miss Sizer. 



Reading, — Racing with a .Storm (from the Prince of 
India), - Lew Wallace 



Miss Lita Stoddarc 

ernv 



girls recognized that fact as a cause for thanksgiving 

when they went down to dinner. Doctor's table was 

decorated by the Seniors, and all the girls expressed 

their congratulations and kind wishes by three cheers 

and the Chatauqua salute, in response to which Dr. Two Studies,— No. iS and No. 24, Op. 740, - Cz 

Seeley gave a short speech. At supper, Doctor's table Miss Ripley. 

celebrated the event, and the Juniors decorated it in On Conway Quay, - - - H. Troterc 

their colors. Doctor received many gifts. Miss De i| a Stoddard. 

Overture, — Midsummer Night's Dream, Mendelssohn 

Since Monday the Seniors and juniors have been 

, ,, , , T /••..• . .1 Misses Ripley and Sizer. 

at peace, for then the juniors sent invitations to the 1 J 

Seniors for a tea to be given in the third-floor parlor on 

Thursday at five o'clock. In less lime than it takes to 

tell it, the acceptances were sent — the Seniors having LnKt rOKfc'ol ACADtMY. 

written them beforehand, no doubt — and till Thursday 

, , , , ., „, Taylor was on the sick list last week, 

there was naught else but smiles. 1 he room was J 

uniquely decorated with palms, green and white ribbons Miss Mack] sister of Mrs Smith, is visiting at the 

— the Junior colors — and white carnations, the Class (Jotta 
flower. The refreshments were all in green and white. 
The Juniors received gracefully and proved themselves 
to be charming hostesses. On leaving, each guest was 
presented with carnations and a knot of Junior ribbon. Mr. Cutler gave the General History class an inter- 

esting talk last week on Greek legends. 

The first recital of the year took place on Monday 

. .1 o • 1 1 TM The membership of the Iliad class has been added 

evening in the Seminary chapel. 1 he programme was r 

, ., to by the entrance of Mr. Geo. Rice, the eminent 

as follows: J 

World's Fair stockholder. 

Chorus, — Greeting, - - Mendelssohn 

VOCAL CLASS. 



ige. 



Clifford P. Hall has discarded the fair sex and 
settled down to diligent study. 



A great snow-ball fight was the result of Monday 
night's snow-fall. Many from the Cottage showed a 
Rondo Brilliant,— For Four Hands, Weber shy ,- e ticence about venturing out under the circum- 

Misses Grace and Margaret Coulter. stances. 

The Set of Turquoise, Thomas Bailey Aldrich At last ou] . soc ; e ties have chosen rooms. Cuts were 

f Count of Lara, a poor nobleman. drawn by the President of each society for first choice^ 

I Beatrice, his wife. and first choice fell to Gamma Sigma, who had decided 

Dramatis Personae,-! . r . . ., ., , ., c . a t^ • t- u 

Miriam, a maid. upon the large room on the first floor. 1 n Kappa has 



Page. a room opening into the chapel on the next floor. 

Miss Nellie Ruth Dillin. As Tri Kappa is to hold no meeting the Wednes- 

Sonata C. Major - - - Havdn c ' a y before Thanksgiving the term election was held 

... T ,. ,,... Wednesday, Nov. 22. The officers for the following 

Miss India Wilson. . , rt 

term will be as follows: President, Cooke; Vice- 

' President, Stoops; Treasurer, Jaeger; Critic, B. Smith 



He Was a Prince, - - - F. L 



Miss Clara Mercer. Cutler; Sergeant-at-arms, Campbell. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



It may be of interest to the lovers of chess in our 
school to learn that the Ancient Egyptians, thousands 
of years ago, were experts at that game. Recent in- 
vestigations along the Nile has placed this beyond a 
doubt. Heretofore it was thought that this game orig- 
inated among the Chinese. This fact was brought out 
in the General History last week. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

The Art Institute met Monday evening at the 
house of Mr. E. F. Chapin, where Prof. Tarbell de- 
livered a lecture on the Greek Drama. 

Captain and quarter-back James Fales, of the 
Alcott School eleven, has been "laid up" for the past 
week. The team has therefore disbanded for the 
season. 

The usual Thanksgiving services will be held at I I 
o'clock in the church. The usual Wednesday evening 
prayer-meeting will be omitted owing to the prepara- 
tory service Saturday evening. 

Work is progressing on the new bridge north of 
Ferry Hall. The Milwaukee Bridge Co. are the con- 
tractors, and will, according to the contract, which was 
let November ist, have the bridge completed in ninety 
days from that time. The bridge will be of iron, with 
wooden flooring. The main span will be 107 feet long, 
resting on piers of concrete laid on piles. Two cantil- 
evers on either end will give a total length of 1S5 feet. 
The cost will be about $4,000. 



EXCHANGES. 

Oberlin has received her first defeat in two years at 
the hands of Case School of Science, Cleveland. 

The Delphic complains sadly that exchanges are 
too full of foot-ball notes. It is perhaps true that too 
much space is devoted to games, but then enthusiasm 
must have its outlet. Perhaps Drake University's 
record in foot-ball does not demand an outlet. 

The faculty of the University of Michigan have 
placed the University athletics under a Board of Con- 
trol, consisting of five members of the faculty and 
four students appointed by the Athletic Association. At 
the Northwestern also by a new rule the "regulation of 
athletics" is vested in a committee composed of three 
members of the faculty, time alumni and three under- 
graduates appointed by the Athletic Association. 



The Wesleyan University always has been a little 
conservative, but when recently co-education was es- 
tablished it was thought that Wesleyan was progress- 
ive. But now the boys have established a girlcott. 
Co-education meets no approval from them for they have 
an impression that the system tends towards effeminacy 
The girl lives in Webb Hall, but now all the little am- 
enities and tender ties between boys and girls are 
barred. Not even moonlight walks are indulged in. 
— Ex. 

The garden gate has ceased of late 

It's load of love to bear, 
But double weight is now the fate 

Of many a parlor chair. — Ex 

LIFE'S UPS AND DOWNS. 

In life we meet in joy and woe, 

Where'r on earth we go, 
A mixture of the good and bad — 

Fate wills it should be so. 
Just in the flush of our success 

Reverses kill our joy, 
But few of us have the ups and downs 

Of the elevetor boy. — Ex. 

" When does a lawyer work like a horse ?" 
" When he draws a conveyance." — Ex. 

The world is full of changes; there is nothing here 
abiding. 

All things are evanescent, fleeting, transitory, glid- 
ing. 

The earth, the sea, the sky, the stars,-where'er the 
fancy ranges, 

The tooth of time forever mars — all life is full of 
changes. 

Like sands upon the ocean's shore, that are forever 
drifting, 

So all the fading scenes of earth incessantly are shift- 
ing. 

Change rules the might}' universe — there is no power 
to block it. 

There's change in everything, alas! except a fellow's 
pocket. 

— Williams Weekly. 

The November Nassau Literary Magazine has 
come to us. Its usual standard of excellence is certain- 
ly well maintained by this issue. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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TEETH > 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. U. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
'ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI £ SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

»f DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH STREET, CHICAGO, ILL., USA, 

+ + > + > 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



X&\}% Jfunfr&mimtctl letter Jiook. 

THE one among them all that survives all changes ami all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it ; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the leader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," 
"Local Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooler's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are lo reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiiing an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

" Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit 'to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in wtdch our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 



concerns us 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9 SO, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

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W. E. RUSTON. Agent. Lake Forest, 111, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



UeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A.M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A.M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M.D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually, 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months."! 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE rHIfAf.n 

S.E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. ^,lll^/\UW. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE. J* b CO 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
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effect. 



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largely conjectural. 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MENS' . 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
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OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantites except the 

commonplace. 



Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
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Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
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(Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

N. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 







Vol. VII. 



December 5, 1893. 



No. 10 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



AS FOLLOWS: 

1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 4. PUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

2. PERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE of DENTAL SURGERY 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co educational. 6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. AT CHICAGO, ILL. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science, 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



SHIRT MAKERS AND 




J MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



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w. j. Root, 

. t ♦ Photographer* 



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A. B. BURDICK, 

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Purchase llor 
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thereby. Nothing but 3 first-class line of 
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Rice Bros. 

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Dr. JOHN HENRY BARROWS GREAT HISTORY 



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PARLIAMENT 

RELIGIONS 



In Two Volumes— 700 Pages each. The only official, reliable, full 
and authentic report of the most notable congress of modern times. 

A. HABERLI, AGENT FOR LAKE FOREST 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1893 



No. 10 



THE FINAL FOOT BALL GAME. 

A TIE WnilTIIE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS. 
SCORE IO-IO. 

The Lake Forest team closed the season by the 
game at Champaign on Thanksgiving Day with 
the University of Illinois. The score was 10-10, thus 
making the third tie game this season. Considering 
the difficulties under which the team labored the result 
was creditable in the highest degree. The recent snow 
and cold weather kept the second eleven from getting 
out, so the 'Varsity team had no regular practice for ten 
days preceding last Thursday. To make matters worse 
Woolsey could not play (except for a very few min- 
utes), Chas. Thorn was laid up, Dave Fales was absent, 
and Dave Williams, "the back bone of the team" could 
not go to Champaign at all. Two men were hurriedly 
gotten from Rush, and though they did good work still 
they were not in practice, and the presence of substi- 
tutes unfamiliar with the signals destroyed the possibil- 
ity of quick snappy playing. The Champaign men 
were very confident, and the odds- were 2 to I against 
Lake Forest and many bets that we could not score at 
all. Our men were naturally rather discouraged at the 
prospect, but resolved to die bravely if need be. Cap- 
tain Hayner showed excellent generalship, playing en- 
tirely on the defensive during the first part of the game 
and saving his men. Champaign scored twice in the 
first half but could not get a point in the second. 
Their center was especially strong and they 
expected to gain ground there, but soon gave up 
that idea and concentrated their strength on Lake 
Forest's weak spot, (the left side of the line,) where 
almost all their gains were made. 

THE TRIP. 

A large part of the afternoon was spent in the city 
in a photograph gallery, where the team pictue was 
taken. The men boarded the five o'clock train on the 
Illinois Central and rode for five hours before reaching 
Champaign. The trip was an enjoyable one, as the 
fellows kept things decidedly on the move. 

The team made its headquarters at the Carter 
House, and there spent Thursday forenoon quietly, a 
few going out to the grounds to practice goal kicking. 
Just before lunch, which was sparingly partaken of, the 
signals were rehearsed, and the team then started for 
the athletic park, where game was to 1 egin at two 
o'clock. The weather was perfect for foot-ball, 
although the field was rather damp and slippery. 

THE GAME. 

A crowd of U. of I. students to the number of five 



hundred witnessed the game and were most liberal in 
their applause. 

Mr. Fergus, of the Chicago Athletics, was umpire, 
and Mr. Woody, of l T . of I., was referee. 

When time was called the teams lined up as follows: 

LAKE FOREST. U, of I. 

Rice right end Cooper 

Palmeter " tackle Branch 

H. Thorn " guard McCormick 

Hunt center Gaut 

Moore left guard Fautz 

Rheingans " tackle Pixley 

Adams " end Atherton, Root 

Hayner quarter Tilton 

D.H.Jackson left half 'Pfeffer 

Lee right " Wright, Chester 

McNary full back Hart, Wright 

LT. of I. won the toss and took the ball. Ou the 
opening play 12 yards was made, but the ball was lost 
to L. F. on four downs. L. F. could make but little 
progress, and Jackson punted 35 yards. U. of I. got 
the ball and, seemingly with little difficulty, were forc- 
ing L. F. towards her own goal. Pixley made most of 
the gains, being run time after time. Several tricks 
were tried which brought U. of I. to the 5-yard line. 
Thorn was hurt at this time, and the game was called 
for five minutes. L. F. now braced up and got the ball 
on four downs. Hayner was employing Yale's tactics, 
so the ball was passed back to Jackson who punted 45 
yards. 

L. F. got the ball and McNary made 5 yards, fol- 
lowed by a beautiful run by Jackson for 35 yards. 
Here Champaign got the ball, aided by some very rank 
decisions on yards gains. Champaign forced the ball 
up the field, Pixley again distinguishing himself. Lake 
Forest was holding well. Hart was injured and his 
place taken by Chester. Cooper made a good run, but 
was smothered by Jackson. The referee at this time 
distinguished himself some more. Champaign steadily 
pushed the ball on. L. F. here gave a fine display of 
defensive work, holding the L T . of I. team to four 
downs with the ball only six inches from the goal iine. 
Jackson punted 35 yards. Champaign then started in 
with a rush, and carrying the ball 5 yards at every play, 
made their first touchdown, the pig-skin being in 
the hands of Chester. Gaut failed to kick goal. LT. of 
I., 4; L. F., o. 

L. F. made 15 yards on the wedge, and 5 more was 
added for off side play. 

The ball was soon lost on four downs, and Branch, 
beautifully guarded, made the longest run of the game — 
75 yards — finally stopped by Jackson.' Thi* brought L T 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



of I. within a few yards of L. F.'s goal line. Lake 
Forest wasevidently rattled, aad before they could re- 
cover themselves, Wright had carried the ball across 
the line for a secoud touchdown. Gaut kicked goal. 
U. of I., 10; L. F., o, 

L. F. made 9 yards by wedge, but lost the ball on 
downs. Champaign made good gains, but were finally 
held. The ball was handed back to Tackson who carried 
it around the end, scoring L. F.'s fir~t touchdown, after 
a run of 65 yards. No goal. U. of I., 10; L. F., 4. 

U. of I. made 17 yards on opening play, and con- 
tinued to carry the ball up the Held. Hayner gave a 
most superb exhibition of tackling at this stage of the 
game, and L. F. had just gotten the ball when time 
was called for the first half. 

The opening of the second half witnessed one of the 
prettiest plays of the day.. The team formed into a 
characteristic Lake Forest flying wedge, (iiot a Deland 
nor a Cornell); the ball was intrusted to Jackson, who, 
guarded by the wedge, carried the ball half the length 
of the field, thus securing the second touchdown for L. 
F. He was successful in kicking this goal. U. of I., 
10; L. F., 10. 

U. of I. made 15 yards on opening play, and by hard 
pushing had reached the 30-yard line before they lost 
the ball on downs. 

Lee, McNary and Jackson made good gains, and or 
some time the playing on both sides was terrific. 
Atherton was hurt, but pluckily resumed play. L. F. 
was forced to kick, and Jaekson sent the ball 40 yards 
down the field. U. of I. got the ball, but lost it shortly. 
Lee gained ground and Jackson punted 15 yards. 
Atherton was again hurt and Root took his place. 
Chester made some good gains for U. of I., but L. F. 
soon got the ball on downs. Jackson made another 
good run of 30 yards and the ball was then pushed 
along slowly till lost on a poor kick. U. of I. lost on 
downs, but recovered the ball on a fumble by McNary. 

Champaign, aided by three off-side plays on the 
part of L. F., was forced down to the .2 5-yard line. 
Rheinganswas hurt and Woolsey took his place. L. F. 
got the ball on downs. Hayner at this juncture, in the 
judgment of the umpire, was guilty of using his hands 
too revengefully about the person of McCormick, and 
was therefore ruled off. Gilleland took his place. L. 
F. was pushing the ball rapidly toward Champaign's 
goal when time was ealled. 

The features of the game were the strong defensive 
play of Lake Forest, Jackson's punting and Hayner's 
phenomenal tackling. 

One touchdown' from the flying wedge was a per- 
fect play. 

The tabulated score is as follows: 



Hunt 

Thorn 

Rheingans. 
Adams. . . . 
Hayner 
Jackson . . . 
McNary. . . 

Lee 

Woolsey. . . 
Gilleland . . 



Total 

Touchdowns 2. Goals 1. 



003 

1 3 11 

007 

242 

o o 2S 

15 220 6 

14 51 6 

17 5 S 6 

000 

000 

49 33 6 Sl 



NOTES OF THE GAME. 

Mrs. Fergus, the referee's wife, accompanied her 
husband and the players on the trip, returning Thurs- 
day evening. We believe she was the only lady to 
wear the red and black and became intense in her ap- 
plause when we were successful. 

Without exception we think the Champaign team 
was the most confident of victory of anv team we have 
played against this fall and they had reason to be, 
while we had reason to feel the opposite. In their 
game with Purden last Saturday they were virtual 
winners. While they played three substitutes, never- 
theless they were all good men. 

Craigin is a generous fellow. Unasked he furnished 
Freshman fun for the entire team during the trip. He 
was in trouble most of the time. After suffering the 
severe loss of an overcoat and hat, which I06S he 
promptly made known to the train officials and passen- 
gers, he lost his shoes much to everyone's sorrow. 

The team are especially thankful to Mr. Palmeter 
and "Buck" McNary, of Rush Medical, for their timely 
service. Neither of them had ever before played the 
positions they so ably filled. 

Harry Thorn, though suffering with a badly-cut lip, 
played a terrific game, while Hayner continually won 
applause from the side lines for his tackling, and Mc- 
Nary for his interference for Jackson around the end. 

The members of the foot-ball team were quite agree- 
ably surprised at the treatment they received from the 
U. of I. men. They were well dealt with all through, 
with the exception of the referee during the game. 
Several of the fellows were taken around to the eating 
clubs, and the evening was spent in one of the "frat" 
rooms. 



Rice 

Palmeter. 
Moore . . . 



Vo. of 
Runs. 


Yards 
Gained 


Tackles 


O 


O 


6 


O 


O 


4 


O 


O 


2 



ATHLETICS. 

The foot-ball season of 1S93 is ended. The cham- 
pionship is decided, and Princeton is queen of the foot- 
ball world. Interest in the game has been much greater 
this year than ever before, and the crowds which turned 
out to all the big games are equalled only by the attend- 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ance at the big boat-race, which is free. The game it- 
self has been varied in stvle, and, unlike last year, at the 
end of the season it seems as though the general style 
of play for the future has been decided. Hereafter 
among the big teams, the game will probably go to the 
team which has the best captain. The material which 
each team has to pick from is about equal, and the 
training and coaching are nearly the same. 

Yale, flushed with victory over Harvard, came down 
to New York confident of victory over Princeton. But 
she forgot to take into account Princeton's veteran line. 
Besides, Princeton had learned her lesson from Harvard, 
and played a straight game with very few tricks. 
Princeton opened with the ball, and Yale was put on 
the defensive almost immediately. Butterworth for 
Yale made several good gains, while Ward, King, 
and Morse of Princeton did some excellent work, for 
the most part around Yale's ends. Finally Princeton, 
getting the ball on her forly yard line, by a series of bril- 
liant rushes pushed the ball down the field and over 
Yale's line for a touch down. In the second half, 
Princeton outplayed her opponent and kept the ball in 
her territory almost the whole time, but was unable to 
score. Yale played with her old-time move and pluck, 
but her desperate efforts to gain ground were of no 
avail against Princeton's line, and her only good source 
of gain was Butterworth's kicking. 

The outcome of the Harvard-Pennsylvania game 
was a great surprise to nearly everyone. Pennsyl- 
vania's strong showing against Yale and Princeton, 
and Harvard's poor showing against Yale seemed to 
point to a hard evenly-matched game. Harvard de- 
pended on the old-fashioned straight-ahead game and 
showed the best interference that has been seen this 
year. Pennsylvania played a hard, desperate game, 
but was not so steady, and for the most part depended 
on Brookes' punting to keep Harvard from scoring. 
During the first half the score was run up to iS by 
Harvard, 2 points being from a safety. Pennsylvania 
by several desperate plays managed to push the ball 
over Harvard's line for a touch down, but failed to kick 
goal. In the next half, while the ball was kept nearly 
all the time in Quaker territory, still Harvard was un- 
able to score more than one touch down. The final 
score was Harvard, 24; Pennslyania, 4. 

Chieago University in her game with Ann Arbor 
played a good uphill game. She did not have as good 
a team as when she played her first Ann Arbor game. 
The game on Thanksgiving day was a walk-over for 
Ann Arbor, and during the first half she not only kept 
Chicago from scoring, but scored herself about as she 
pleased. In the second half the playing was more 
even, and each team scored 10 points. Neil played the 
game for Chicago and made nearly all her gains. The 
game was played for the most part in a snowstorm, and 
much loose work was the result. Score: Ann Arbor, 
28; Chicago, 10. 



The Chicago Athletic team surprised everybody 
by defeating the Boston Athletic in a hard - fought 
game. The game was played in a snowstorm on a 
snowy field, and as the Chicago team were the heavier 
they had the advantage. The play was rather loose, 
and for the most part was individual rather than team 
work. There were several local players on the Chi- 
cago team, while the Boston team was composed nearly 
altogether of old eastern players. The score was: 
Chicago, S; Boston, 4. 

Illinois is without a champion College foot - ball 
team. Tne honors are divided between Chicago, Lake 
Forest, Evanston and Champaign. The first three have 
each won a game. Champaign has tied with Lake 
Forest and Evanston, but did not play Chicago. 



BOWLING REGULATIONS. 

Unfortunately bowling is the most popular of all 
forms of exercise at the gymnasium. It is unfortunate 
because we have but two alleys; yet if regulations were 
made all might be accommodated. The Academy can 
have no claims to both alleys at once, though they do 
have them under existing circumstances. We have no 
bone to pick with the Academy. It is only natural that 
thev, under the reign of Adam Smith's doctrine of 
each one for himself, should try to possess everything. 
As it is now without any regulations they can do so. 

We propose the following regulations: That the 
College men should have one bowling alley to call their 
own, and the Academy the other. That if College men 
are found on the Academy alley they can be ordered 
off whenever two Academy students want to play, and 
vice versa. That if there should be by mutual consent 
two College men and two of the Academy on the Acad- 
emy alley, the two College men cannot be ordered off 
without the consent of the two Academy players, and 
vice versa. That in case there are three College men 
and one Academy student, or one College man and one 
Academy student, on the Academy alley, any two or 
four Academy students who are anxious to play have 
the right to break up the game and take the allev; and 
vice versa on the College alley. 

These rules are strict, to be sure; but only strict 
rules can be tolerated when so much discontent prevails 
as at present. It is to be hoped the committee in charge 
will attend to the matter at once. * * * 



The man who's on the ocean, 

And seasick in his berth, 
Amidst the storm's commotion, 

Is the man that wants the earth. — Ex. 

The University of Chicago Weekly issued an elab- 
orate Thanksgiving number. 

We have noticed in the Sewanee Times a disposi- 
tion to lament that " mountain dew" is prohibited to the 
students there, as well as smoking during "exams." 
This needs no comment. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
VV. B. Hunt, '94, > 

A. 0. Jackson, '96, > 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 

Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 
Miss Lucia Clark, I 
Miss Louise Conger, J 
S. E. Gruenstein, ) 

B. S. Cutler, i 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 

- Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

Aletheian 

- Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



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Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



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.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

THE Christmas number of The Stentor will 
appear next week. Among the special 
features will be an article by Prof. Halsey on 
"How to Read," also an article by Dr. Coulter, 
and a picture of the foot-ball team. 

* * 
* 

HOW ELEVATE WESTERN FOOT-BALL. 

IT is a patent fact that foot-ball among wes- 
tern colleges does not occupy as high a 
position in the mind of the public as the same 
sport among the eastern universities. We do 
not find thirty or fifty thousand people flocking 
to see a foot-ball game. The interest is not 
one-tenth as strong as in the east. Why is this 
true? An obvious answer is that the eastern 
schools have the benefit of tradition; they 
have an army of alumni and friends. But this 
is not enough to entirely explain the difference 
in attendance at a Lake Forest-Northwestern 
and a Princeton-Yale game. There are other 
reasons which tend to discredit the science of 
brain and brawn, which should be taken into 
account. 

First in order, though probably not first in 
importance, we would place as one of the 
drawbacks under which western foot-ball suf- 
fers, newspaper misrepresentation. Some of 



it is intentional, much of it is unintended. In 
the East, foot-ball reporting is a specialty, but 
we all know from experience that the Chicago 
papers rarely or never give a perfectly accurate 
account of a game. The cause is simply that 
the reporters assigned to do the work are en- 
tirely incompetent. They can write up a horse 
race, so they seem to think that foot-ball is 
right in their line and that they do not need 
to study up the rules of the game or even to 
understand the work of the different positions. 
It is the fashion of these reporters to try to 
cover up their real lack of knowledge of the 
game with highly-colored picturesof the "slug- 
ging" and brutality indulged in by the players. 
Needless to say, there is more fiction than 
truth in their stories. But the general public 
is always ready to believe the worst, and con- 
sequently we frequently find men loud in their 
condemnation of foot-ball who never witnessed 
a game and who derive all their information 
from sensational newspaper reports. The 
remedy for this evil is to have games reported 
by men thoroughly conversant with the tech- 
nical points, who will give a truthful and im- 
partial report. Men to do this can be found. 

The three greatest games of the season 
were entirely free from brutality of any sort. 
If it is true that there is more "slugging" in the 
West than in the East, it will disappear with 
time. But the principal reason why there is 
any unnecessary roughness is due to the laxity 
of umpires and referees. Here is a chance for 
a decided reform. It is a pernicious custom 
followed by most western schools, of taking 
umpires and referees from their own institu- 
tions. Such men must of necessity overlook 
the illegitimate plays of their own team. And 
so long as there is promiscuous "kicking" 
about men who try to be honest and fair, so 
long will good men refuse to umpire or referee 
a match. Poor umpiring and refereeing has 
figured conspicuously in several of our Lake 
Forest games this season. 

Another thing which has rather hurt the 
interest in foot-ball in Chicago has been the 
practice of the Chicago University team of 
playing two or more games with the same 
teams. The interest should all be centered on 
one decisive game, and not dissipated in the 
"best two out of three" idea. If Yale and 
Harvard should play two or three games with 
each other the present intense interest would 
soon disappear. 

These are a few of the causes which tend to 
down the standard of western college foot-ball. 
Others could be named. All might be removed 
by the use of more care and co-operation. 
Western teams owe it to themselves to use 
their best endeavors toward putting foot-ball 
in the high plane to which it is rightly entitled. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Mr. J. H. Jones took Thanksgiving dinner at Mr. 
Goodman's home in Chicago. 

Recitations closed at noon on the 29th, and began 
again at 2 e'clock on Dec. 4th. 

Mr. Robert Roberts, '97, preached to a Welsh con- 
gregation in Chicago last Sabbath. 

Mr. Blanchard, a friend of Mr. Waldo, spent a few- 
days last week with the latter gentleman. 

Mr. Carver has been confined to his room for sev- 
eral days during the past week by bad cold. 

Prof. Jack thinks Roberts and Ritchey are all right 
as essay writers, and as repeaters especially strong. 

More snow has fallen in the last few days than has 
been seen in Lake Forest for lo! these many years. 

The Seniors are organizing an indoor base ball 
team. A captain will shortly be elected and then play 
will begin. 

Messrs. H. L. Bird and J. C. Lininger were very 
pleasantly entertained at the home of Rev. Mr. Moore 
Thanksgiving Day. 

F. S. Mellen and A. P. Bourns attended a party 
given by Miss Bessie M. Beach at her home in 
Chicago last Friday evening. 

Miss Wilcox entertained a party of young people at 
the home of Prof. Stevens last Friday evening. Taffy 
pulling was the chief amusement. 

The encasement of Prof. Walter Smith and Mis. 
Ralston was formally announced last week. The 
Stentor extends congratulations. 

Prof. Stuart is busily engaged on an edition of 
Cicero, which he is preparing in conjunction with 
President Harper of the University of Chicago. 

President Coulter lectured in the town hall of Pax- 
ton, 111., on Friday evening last and addressed the 
Teachers' Association of that place Saturday morning 

Adams' experience with the Champaign hotels 
caused him to wonder what would happen in case a 
species of the cimex lectnlarius should light on a man's 
eye. 

Mr. J. Z. Johnson has moved his organ into the 
College dormitory and now discourses sweet strains to 
the intense enjoyment of the members of the third 
floor. 

President Coulter addressed the Ministers' Associa- 
tion of Chicago on Monday, Nov. 27th. It was a com- 
prehensive address, outlining the history of the theories 
of evolution and was highly appreciated. 

Prof. Locy gave a very interesting chapel talk last 
Tuesday morning on "What is Biology?" He defined 
it as the science which explains the phenomena of life, 
and defined its field in the realm of knowledge. 



The first sleigh ride of the season was taken last 
Friday afternoon via Fort Sheridan. Six couples, de- 
lightfully chaperoned, embraced the opportunity. 
The weather, which was considerably below the 
thawing point, did not prevent a jolly good time. 

The Thanksgiving recess is dull enough at best in 
Lake Forest, but when your schemes for the alleviation 
of homesickness are suddenly checkmated by the pow- 
ers that be, it is positively discouraging. Man proposes, 
but "Doc" disposes. So thought a few gentlemen last 
Thursday evening. 

The University Musical Association met last Tues- 
day evening and elected its officers for the ensuing year 
as follows: President, E. B. Uline; Vice-president, H. 
W. Harris; Secretary and Treasurer, C. G. Smith. 
These officers, together with the leaders of the various 
clubs, compose the executive board. 

The University Club met at the home of Prof. 
Stevens last Tuesday evening. The best part- of the 
program was an interesting paper by Dr. Holmes, of 
Chicago, on "The Conscience of the State." Mrs. 
Hester delighted the club with vocal music. It gives 
us much pleasure in this connection to say that Dr. 
Holmes has been secured to address the student body 
next week. 

The members of the Senior class in English litera- 
ture are required to write thesis from the following 
choice of subjects: Scott's Poetical Works, Gold- 
smith's Prose and Poetical Works, Shelley's Poetry, 
Keat's Poetry, Coleridge's Poetry (excepting the 
dramas), Carlyle's "Sartor Resartus" and "Past and 
Present," Macaulay's Literary Works and Edmund 
Burke's (selected works). 



FERRY HALL. 

Five of the College boys commenced preparations 
for a spread to be given to five Sems., Thanksgiving 
evening, but when the time arrived, it was found that 
the Herr Doctor had some objections to the project, 
and such a difficulty proved insurmountable. However, 
a part of the feast was brought over to the disappointed 
girls the next morning, and later in the day a sleigh- 
ride was given for them. It was the first of the season 
and a fitting end for the vacation. 

Most all of the girls started off Wednesday after- 
noon, only about thirty being left to spend the vaeation 
at Ferry Hall. But the thirty were in for fun and 
made time fly in innumerable ways. Wednesday even- 
ing was spent quietly in opening boxes, finding turkeys, 
some with feathers on (see Miss Miller), and some with 
feathers off, pulling corks, and getting ready in general 
for the following day. By twelve o'clock even such a 
delightful occupation as this grew tiresome, and some- 
thing new, in the form of a pillow fight, was proposed, 
so these queer people adjourned to the gymnasium, 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



where they threw pillows to their hearts' content. It 
would be dangerous to ask how many pillows were 
split open, but when the air became heavy wtth feath- 
ers, a motion for adjournment was in order. The as- 
cent was as artistically executed as the descent. There 
is nothing like a little experience. 

Thursday morning skating was in order, and a few 
courageous enough to climb the ravines went over to 
the pond. All reported a good time. 

The dinner was the crowning feature of the day. 
The tables were set out in a square and were tastefully 
decorated. It is needless to say that the Sem. girls 
found the seven-course dinner enjoyable, and after two 
hours of feasting they were quite ready to return up- 
stairs. 

A vain attempt was made at a sleigh ride, but a 
Virginia Reel — en costume — and a few games of domi- 
noes were substituted, and made a pleasant afternoon. 

Dr. Seeley asked all the young gentlemen to spend 
the evening at Ferry Hall, and quite a number came 
over. The evening was made pleasant by a number of 
pantomimes, prepared by Miss Phelps, and after re- 
freshments, good old-fashioned games were in order. 
" Drop the handkerchief " proved quite an attraction. 

THANKSGIVING FESTIVITIES. 

Some of the young ladies have kindly contributed 
accounts of the hilarious manner in which the Thanks- 
giving recess was (?iot) passed. As anyone can readily 
see, it was an unbroken round of gaiety : 

It would, indeed, be an act of great misdemeanor on 
the part of the Ferry Hall voung ladies to allow The 
Stentor to go to press without extending a vote of 
thanks, per se, to the gentlemen of the University who 
so kindly contributed to their enjoyment during the re- 
cent vacation. Time and space will not permit of an 
extended description of the numerous entertainments 
which were crowded one upon another in the two short 
holidays, but one especially is worthy of mention. 
Thursday evening the members of the Athaenean 
Society gave a very swell dinner party in their nicely 
furnished rooms in College Hall. Invitations were 
issued to the favored ones in the Sem., and at five- 
forty-five on the appointed evening Dent's finest equip- 
ment for sleighing reined up in front of the Hall to 
convey the young ladies to the scene of the delightful 
festival. Everything that active brains could invent 
and hands devise had been prepared to make the even- 
ing the most enjoyable- of the season. In every nook 
and corner fluttered the gay colors of the Society, and 
the floral decorations were beautiful beyond descrip- 
tion. Covers were laid for forty upon the uniquely 
and tastefully decorated table. The menu consisted of 
ten elaborate courses, and was served by Kinsley. This 
symposium was followed by an intellectual feast of 
impromptu speeches. After four short hours of pure 
enjoyment, the happy gathering dispersed, each guest 
being presented with a dainty souvenir of the occasion, 



— a photograph of the members of the Society. As 
the jovial party returned home the air resounded with 
the shouts of " Long live the Athrcneans." 

thanksgiving feast. 
Among the most enjoyable events of the Thanks- 
giving vacation was the theatre party given by the ten 
members of the Zeta Epsilon Society to as many of 
their Ferry Hall friends. The joyful party left on the 
noon train, having been conveyed to the station in the 
tally-ho. The trip to the ctty was all too short. 
"The Bostonians" was the matinee chosen and 
after the opera a dinner was served at Kinsley's. So 
varied and elegant were the many courses that a poor 
steel pen fails in the description, and it must be left to 
a fertile imagination. All rated the affair a treat of a 
lifetime and the girls are still sounding the praises of 
those generous boys. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Mrs. Burnap was visited by Mrs. Slade, of Chicago, 
last week. 

The Seniors handed their rhetoric orations to Prof. 
Whiteford last Wednesday. The subjects of the ora- 
tions were varied and interesting. 

Over one-half of the Academy students left town 
during the Thanksgiving recess. 

East Dormitory and the Durand Cottage were the 
scenes of most elegant Thanksgiving dinners last 
Thursday. 

If we are not mistaken Brown felt pretty blue the 
day he fell into Fry's pond. He is going to swear off 
skating now. 

Rev. E. B. Hubbell, pastor of the Immanuel Pres- 
byterian Church in Chicago, visited Professor and Mrs. 
Palmer on Thanksgiving Day. 

We are indebted to Dr. Seeley and the young ladies 
of Ferry Hall for the pleasant evening spent at Ferry 
Hall last Thursday. 

The first issue of the Weekly Bulletin, the new 
paper published in the Academy, appeared yesterday 
evening. The Bulletin is the first publication ever 
gotten up in that department. 

Mr. Charles Holt, in a letter to the Academy boys, 
expressed his willingness to continue awarding the 
prizes in the contest between the Gamma Sigma and 
Tri Kappa societies. The Academy societies have in 
Mr. Holt a lasting friend, and their gratefulness to him 
is almost too large to express. 

The Academy foot-ball team has enjoyed a season 
of marked prosperity. Out of five games played by 
them they lost but two, and this only through unfor- 
tunate and unjust circumstances. It is hoped that next 
year's team will make as good a record. Now that out- 
door exercise must be abandoned until spring, the 
gymnasium classes will be organized. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



■ ALUMNI, 

The announcement is made in "The Highland Park 
Register" of the birth of a daughter to Dr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd P. Bergen. 

Opening a copy of " The Vermillion Democrat," 
published at Dana, Vermillion County, Ind., we were 
surprised and gratified to read, following the caption, 
" Beatrice Bilsland Taylor, Editor and Proprietor." 
The Stentor extends to Miss Taylor a fraternal 
journalistic hand, and trusts she may be able to edu- 
cate the Vermillion County democracy up to the high 
standard of "The Indianapolis News," which she 
quotes appro vingly. 

Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Baker, of 'S2, have removed to 
Del Norte, Colo., for the sake of Mr. Baker's health. 
Mrs. Baker is Academic instructor in the Presbyterian 
College of the Southwest, located at Del Norte, and is 
also a trustee of the church at that place of which the 
Rev. Grant Stroh of 'S9 is pastor. Mr. Stroh has 
been very successful in his last year's work, and re- 
ceived eleven additions to his church membership last 
month. Mrs. S.troh conducts a large Junior Christian 
Endeavor Society on Sunday afternoons. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. James Harlan spent Sunday with Mr. Delavan 
Smith. 

Miss Julia Moss spent the Thanksgiving holidays in 
Lake Forest. 

A number of Lake Foresters watched the Boston- 
Chicago foot-ball game. 

The engagement of Mrs. Julia Gould Ralston to 
Prof. Walter Smith was announced Thanksgiving 
day. 

A S} stem of ventilating has been introduced into the 
Presbyterian Church. The ventilation is through reg- 
isters in the roof. 

There are at present three cases of typhoid fever in 
Lake Forest. The victims are Miss Jane Fraser, 
Henry Watson and James Fales. 

The State Board of Health has notified the School 
Committee that no child can be allowed to attend the 
City School who cannot show satisfactory evidence of 
recent successful vaccination. 

The new train which leaves Lake Forest at 12:2s 
p. m. is the fastest train hitherto allowed to Lake 
Foresters. It is scheduled to reach the city in 47 
minutes and sometimes makes it in less time. 

Thanksgiving services were held in the church 
Thursday morning. Assisting Dr. McClure on the 
platform were Prof. Stuart, Rev. Dr. Nichols, Rev. 
Mr. Moore, Prof. Thomas and Rev. Mr. Gallwey. 



Thanks are due to Mrs. E. F. Chapin for the beauti- 
ful and significant decorations. 

The sidewalks have been kept fairly clean from the 
recent snows by the street commissioner. But there are 
a few sections which have been neglected. The 
Stentor begs leave to inform the commissioner that 
the sidewalk on Westminster avenue, from Mr. Alex's 
East, is as yet unplowed. 

At a special meeting of the city council, held Nov. 
27, two ordinances of general interest were adopted. 
One forbids the firing of any weapon anywhere within 
the city limits. The old ordinance allowed any one to 
shoot or to permit shooting on his own premises. In 
view of the fact that bullets have been flying about in a 
way perilous to the general welfare and that one re- 
cently crashed through a window into the parlor of one 
of the councillors, a law without an}' exceptions has 
been demanded. The other ordinance forbids running 
bicycles on the sielewalks of the city. In this provision 
Lake Forest is slowly following the example of her 
suburban neighbors, and pedestrians will now have 
tome portion of the sixty-six feet of thoroughfare 
which they can call their own legally. 



EXCHANGES. 

WEARY ! 

Backward, turn backward O Time in thy flight, 

Feed me on gravel and chips, just for to-night; 
I am so weary of Fem Sem steak, 

Petrified doughnuts and vulcanized cake; 
Oysters that sleep in a watery bath, 

Butter as strong as Goliath of Gath. 
Backward, turn backward, for weary I am 

Of Saturday noon with its cabbage and ham. 
Give me some milk that has never been skimmed; 

And give me some cream that hasn't been thinned; 
Let me but once eat an old-fashioned pie, 

Then I'll be ready to curl up and die. 

— Northwestern. 

Question: How do you regard death? 

Answer: Our views on death are much the same as 
those of Mrs. Partington. She says: "We shall all 
come to an end some day though we may never live to 
see it." — Ex. 

The youth falls down with a piercing shriek, 
And his classmates round him come; 
They find his jaw broken — the cause they seek. 
Oh, foolish youth! He tried to rend Greek 
While he was chewing his gum. — Ex. 

The Indiana Student is giving a series of papers 
by members of the faculty on the work of the several 
departments. Each article is accompanied by a picture 
of the professor in charge of it. 



WATCH 



for the 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



of 



The University Stentor 

FULL PAGE PICTURE « FOOTBALL TEAM 



AND NUMEROUS OTHER SPEGIAL FEATURES. 



SINGLE COPIES, 



FIVE CENTS. 



SPECIAL RATE. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR will be sent to any address for the 
remainder of the school year for only $ 1.00. 



A. P. BOURNS, Business Manager, 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PORCELAIN 
TEETH I» 



The 2000 moulds in constant use in our manufactory 
afford an extent and variety of forms of Porcelain 
Teeth unapproached elsewhere. 

Practically they reproduce the infinite variations 
of nature's forms meeting every requirement of the 
dentist, every need of the patient, whether from the 
stand-point of usefulness or of esthetics. Cases re- 
quiring the substitution of either a partial or an entire 
denture which cannot be supplied from our stock are so rare as to be unknown. 



FACTS AND INFERENCE. 

The most successful manufacturers of Porcelain Teeth of the present day are H. D. 
Justi & Son. Their moulds are the result of deep study and many experiments. They have 
the appearance of nature, adaptability, and are in perfect harmony with the features. They 
are the most perfect imitations of nature ever produced. These facts are so well known to 
the profession and trade that other manufacturers would find it difficult to make salable arti- 
ficial teeth without following Justi's productions as patterns. The fact that other makers do 
copy our moulds is evidence in itself that they excel all others, and are unsurpassed in design 
and workmanship. 

H. D. JUSTI & SON, 

PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

Chicago College 

"DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH STREET. CHICAGO, ILL, U.S.A. 

* * » * £ 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large bodv of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatlv enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooley's work should be read by every law student: 

"And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiiing an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greally changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 



concerns us. 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS. $9 50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 1 14 Monroe St., Chicago. 

STI JOF^T\fTS P resentm g ^u's ad. will be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

^ ^ The Model Clothing House, 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., 

"The JVjodel" makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN. 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats iP Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. "Verbum Sat Sapienti." 





A. G. Spalding & Bros., 




A Complete Line of the 


tM 


Celebrated 


* 


Victor Bicycles, 


£5 


Shaker Sweaters, 
Base Ball, 


TXbe Craio press, 

printers, publishers, Designers 

178=182 flDonroe Street 
Chicago. 


Lawn Tenis, 

Photographic Supplies, Etc. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros., Pl- „_. 
108 Madison Street, V^mCagO. 




W. E. RUSTON. Agent Lake Forest. 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 



IReetauraut anfc 
Choice Confectionery, 

ice cream and salads of all kinds 

made to order —— . 

choice Confectionery a specialty. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 



Lake Forest, III. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



DEALER IN 



Cement 
Sidewalks. 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS, 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
• SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, ETC . 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, HI. 



THOMAS F. HOWE 

.^PRETIGULO 

PLUMBER and GAS FITTER 



SANITARY WORK 
A SPECIALTY 



LAKE FOREST 



ILLINOIS 



]SJORMAN J. ROBERTS, 

DENTAL 
SURGEON 

WAUKEGAN, ILL. 




Variable 
Route 

Tourist tickets 
allowing privi- 
leges never be- 
fore accorded, 
can be obtained 
with full infor- 
mation, upon 
application to 
any ticket 
agent, or to the 
General Pass- 
enger Agent, 
CHICAGO. 



FROM CHICAGO. 



All meals served 
in Dining Cars. 

Palace Drawing- 
Room Sleeping Cars 
and Tourist Sleepers 
are run through te 
San Francisco 
without change, 
leaving Chicago 
daily via the 



50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERIAL, 

ARTISTS' MATERIAL, 
MATHEMATICAL. INSTRUMENTS 
ART NOVELTIES, 
STUDIES FOR COPYING 



North-Western Line 

CHICAGO &. NORTH-WESTERN RV. 



ROBERT MERCER 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS, 

TOBACCO, 

PIPES, AND 

STATIONERY. 

AGENT FOR 
ALL CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



J. G. Cornish, 



DEALER IN 



• Fine • Carriages, • Phaetons, « 

Top Buggies, Road Carts, 



AND MANUFACTURER OF 



SUPERIOR . GRADES . OF . HARNESS, 

Waukegan. III. 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
AND DEALERS IN 

MEDICAL and ROOKS 
SCIENTIFIC * •■Jv^VJrVO 

. 96 Washington Street, 
Chicago 



Fred. Palmer, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

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CARR,AGE ™ M M,NGS, 

BLANKETS, Etc. 

Waukegan, III. 



QANDY 

CANDY 
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Send $1.25, $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box by express, 
of the best candies in America, 
put up in Elegant Boxes and 
Strictly Pure. Suitable for 
presents. Express charges pre- 
paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all 'Chicago. Try it once. 
ADDRESS, 

C F GUNTHER 

CONFECTOINER 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A.M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Profe.ssor of Clinical Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 

Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



HICAGO 
COLLEGE 

« LAW 

faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE rHIfAfn 

S. E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. ^IllGAUU. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



JAMES WILDE J R is CO 



AN UNEQUALED SELECTION 
OF YOUNG MEN'S 
STRICTLY TAILOR-MADE 
CLOTHING. 



You may obtain Wilde's perfection 
by visiting a high-priced tailor. 



Again, you may not. 



The chances are about even. 



When it comes to price ours has 
the advantage by thirty-three per 
cent on the money saving side. 



Our young men's SINGLE 
and DOUBLE-BREASTED 
SACK SUITS, 
CUTAWAY FROCK SUITS, 
OVERCOATS, 

are made extremely long 
according to style, and we 
revel in unlimited styles and 

quantities except the 

commonplace. 



You try our's right on and judge 
effect. 

The result of a tailor's effort is 
largely conjectural. 



Young Men's Suits - - - $12 Sacks and Frocks from that to S35 
Fall Overcoats, - - - $5 to $35. 
Winter Overcoats, - - - $12 to $50. 
Deep Cape Extra Long Macintoshes $7.50 to $25. 
Trousers 'Scholastic) - - $3 to $6 

< Dress) - - - $5 to $12 
Evening Dress Suits at $22, better ones up to $45 

Full Dress Suits for rent 
Do not forget that we sell Furnishings, Shoes and Hats. 

James Wilde, Jr., & Co. 

IN. E. cor. State and Madison Sts. 
Frank Reed, Manager. 







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The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY. DECEMBER 12, il 



No. 1 1 



HOW TO READ. 



BY JOHN J. HALSEY, PROFESSOR OF 

What should be the purpose of a college student's 
reading? It is safe to say that it should all be directed 
to the end for which he is in college-education, and that 
too, whether the immediate aim be entertainment or 
class-room work. For the educative value of a book 
lies not entirely in its substance, but to a considerable 
degree in the spirit of the reader. One can conceive a care- 
ful reader perusing 
Zolas " Debacle " with 
a better educational 
result than another 
might draw from a 
study of all his routine 
text books. All read- 
ing should be done 
with the determination 
to carry away there- 
from something to en- 
rich one's life — either 
with facts, orprinciples, 
or sentiments, or mo- 
tives. Let fiction, as 
well as history, science 
and philosophy, con- 
tribute to this end, and 
consider the news sheet 
as useful an adjunct as 
the printed book. The 
class-rooms should be 
so many nuclei around 
which should be con- 
centred all the reading 
of the hours controlled 
by the student. No 
argument is needed to 
prove that the student 
who confines his ac- 
quisitions to the circle 

of his text books will nDr>c , 

not become an .educated man. The class-room work 
can only stimulate curiousity and teach method, and 
outside reading and observation must enlarge the vis- 
ion and test the theories. 

What, then, should be read? In the first place a 
special line of reading should be carried along with each 
stud)'. Now that the colleges are coming so generally 
to restrict the number of subjects studied at one time, 
it is an easy matter to carry the three or four lines of 
work into the library and the study. The text-book is 
fairly committed to one view of a subject. So is the 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

teacher. Only by the comparative method of severa 
books is one enabled to form an independent judgment. 
What student is competent to form an opinion on the 
tariff question who knows only one book on the sub- 
ject, or even the added wisdom of one newspaper? 
But technical treatises are not the only food for the on- 
nivprous student. There is no subject of collegiate in- 
struction which has 
not to-day its journals. 
These should be kept 
in continual view and 
portions read as time 
allows. All this how- 
ever is reading as 
work. But there is a 
large contributory field 
of reading that it is 
just as important to 
enter upon for enter- 
tainment first, for edu- 
cational results also. 
Read no fiction from 
which one cannot 
carry away not only 
enjoyment but instruc- 
tion — foodf or the men- 
tal stomach as well as 
palate. Read poetry, 
and criticism, which is 
also literature, w i t h 
the same double pur- 
p o s e. Make the 
newspaper and maga- 
zine reading bear 
along historical, eco- 
nomic, and literary and 
other educational lines 
of thinking, and at 
, 'u.,'c C ^ '' '" ' " !r=z '— ' length a habit will be 

J." nALjti. . ° 

formed by which, as though instinctively, all innutrit- 
ious material will be rejected. 

How shall we read? Bacon said of books, " some 
are to be tasted, some chewed, and some digested." In 
other words some are to be merely known to be, others 
have profitable portions which can be successfully ex- 
tracted, others are solid food for the soul, and are to be 
made completely our own. How may this best be 
done? Do not fear to reread, to pause and meditate on 
good reading, even in this busy age. Still, it is quality 
rather than quantity that counts and one can yet regret 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



the good old times when men knew by heart whole 
books an Iliad or an Aeneisd. Read with the diction- 
ary on one hand and the atlas and gazetteer on the 
other. Bye and bye they will be opened less frequently 
and the pleasures of acquisition will be enjoyed unal- 
loyed by a supicion of being at work. It is the first 
steps that cost and the apprentice reader must climb to 
his higher privilege gradually. But rest assured that 
there comes a time when no reading which contributes 
in any wise to be enlargement of ones mental or moral 
life can seem tedious; when the joy of aquisition, of 
nourishment, of added power, makes any book which 
tourches the problems of nature or of life a thing to be 
desired and appropriated. 



" HEADS OR TAILS?" 

It was a night or two before Christmas, and a cold 
Christmas time it was. Will Raymond had finished 
his dinner, and now sat all alone before the fire, with 
nothing particular to do; only to grow sad, as you and 
I do, when the mournful mood comes on, and the 
flames, leaping, dancing, grimacing, take the old 
familiar forms, and we see again the scenes we didn't 
think much of, but which we love to recall. So Raj'- 
mond saw his dear old mother in her easy chair just on 
one side, and father quiet and happy on the other. 
The "kid," Jim, was sprawled out on the floor, restiess 
and wild as a colt, and Raymond could almost hear his 
mother's low tones telling of former Christmas Eves. 
But now they were gone — all gone! Father and 
mother up in the grave-yard, where the snow made 
two white mounds, and the wind whistled coldest. And 
Jim — yes — poor littlejim — where was he? Wild? Yes. 
He ran away soon after mother died, — said he couldn't 
stand home without her, and that he was going to the 
devil. Perhaps he had, — no one knows, — he was very 
young. 

Raymond's lower lip quivered a bit, and he thought 
it beastly luck. No Christmas presents now; no, 
nothing but saddest of memories! 

The clock striking half aroused him, and called to 
mind the Moody meeting down at the church, and that 
he ought to be there to help in the ushering, but it was 
pleasant picturing old faces, and sad thoughts make us 
better men and women. But the easy chair wasn't 
half so comfortable and his conscience kept biting. 
Laughing, he drew a cent from his pocket, and speak- 
ing half aloud, said: "Heads I stay, tails I go," and 
carefully poising the coin on thumb and forefinger, 
spun it into the air. It lit and fell under the great 
chair. Half ashamed, he drew a match from his 
pocket, and lighting it, peered under and found it, lying 
tails up. 

" Well," he muttered, "it takes three times to decide, 
you know," and he tossed it again, and it let down 
among the folds of the rug — tails up. 

He straightened up, saying, "That settles it; but 



its horribly cold," and he gave a little shudder as he 
glanced at the frosted windows. 

Raymond put on his greatcoat and warm hat, rubbers 
and all, and went out. There were few people on the 
streets until he neared the vicinity of the church, and 
there was quite a stream of people, all headed the same 
way — for Moody was to speak, and Sankey, the sweet 
singer and saver of souls was to sing. 

Raymond passed in behind quite a crowd, hastening 
to get seats, and at the head of the stairs he met a rather 
rough-looking fellow, not badly dressed — just "sporty." 
There was a careless look about him, and a smell of 
tobacco, but withal he had an attractive face, and his 
curly hair gave him a boyish look. 

Raymond spoke to him. "How do you do? Not 
going are you? The meeting will commence soon." 

He smiled, and the stranger hesitated, fumbling his 
hat in an undecided way. 

"Why," he said, "I guess the}' don't want such as 
me in there." 

"Why, yes they do; come in. I will show you a 
seat," and Raymond led the way back in and found a 
seat for him, and then stepped back to the door and 
watched the people crowd in. Somehow he felt 
strangely at peace with himself and the world, and 
thought it was because he had braved the storm. 

Then Mr. Moody appeared. You've seen him — 
short and fat, and looks like a sea-captain. How he wins 
his way into commonplace hearts like yours and mine! 
Sankey, too, just back from Europe, where he had 
gone soon after his son had died, was there, and sang a 
song that brought tears to Raymond's eyes, and many 
others, I warrant. It was "Where is my wandering 
boy to-night?" The people knew that there was a man 
singing who could feel; and, perhaps, it brought some 
one home that night. 

After the meeting, the great crowd passed out. 
Some two hundred stayed to the after-meeting. Ray- 
mond, too, went down, and at the door he was met at 
by a good old deacon. 

" Mr. Raymond, there's a young fellow just come 
in, over by the stove — yes, that one. Go over and help 
him along, that's a good boy." 

Raymond walked slowly over, and found his ac- 
quaintance of the door sitting rather shame- facedly 
looking at the stove. 

Raymond did not say much, but just reached out his 
hand, and sat down. The young fellow blurted out, 

" Say, I ain't much, but I've been leading a pretty 

hard life, and I'm tired of it all, and that d d song 

that feller sang just finished me off. I want to lead a 
straight life, pardner." 

He paused as though half-frightened at his impulse- 
iveness, and both gazed thoughtfully into the fire, and 
there were tears in two pairs of eyes. 

" Mother living?" Raymond finally asked. 

« No. That's it. She and dad are up in Rose Hill- 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



I've got a brother somewhere; but I guess he wouldn't 
care much for me now." 

There was another long pause, and Raymond asked 
quickly and nervously, 

" Was it you that put the flowers on the graves last 
November?" 

Th-' stranger did not seem surprised at the question. 
He only said, "Yep." 

Another long pause; and then Raymond leaned 
over, and, simply holding out his hand, said, "Hello, 
Jim." 

The other only said, " Hello, Bill." 

That was all. 

Soon they arose, and on the way out passed the 
good old deacon, who read the joy in their faces, and 
grasping Jim's hands, exclaimed, 

"Coming into the fold?" And then, " Why, bless 
me, how much alike you two look! —bless me! " 

Raymond said quietly, 

" Deacon B , my brother." 

Once outside, the younger turned to bis brother, and 
said, 

" Sav, Bill, say — ain't you ashamed of me? If you 
are, Bill, I'll skedaddle." 

The other turned, and said quietly, a joyful look 
shining in his eyes, 

"Ashamed of God's Christmas present? I guess 

not!" 

Fred. A. Hayner. 




Dr. John M. Coulter. President L. F. U. 



THE DENOMINATIONAL COLLEGE. 

In America, at least, the church is the mother of 
college education. Founded primarily to raise up a 
trained ministry, these colleges have outgrown their 
original purpose and have entered every domain of 
thought. In the East, on account of age and long 
monopolv, the church-founded college has remained 
dominant. In the West, state colleges were founded 
along with church colleges, and liberally disposed leg- 
islatures have generally provided means for their rapid 
development. The question, therefore, has been per- 
tinently raised, whether the denominational college is 
any longer a necessity. So far as educational methods 
go the same principles should prevail in all colleges. 
The same subjects are taught in all; the lecture, the 
laboratory, the seminary in the hands of trained teach- 
ers are common to all. Denominational doctrines are 
no more taught in the modern church college than in 
the state college. Is there then any stronger reason to- 
day for the church college than a reasonable multiplica- 
tion of colleges? 

I wish to select one answer out of many that seems 
worthy of consideration. Independent thinking is the 
educational creed of to-day. The spirit of investigation 
is the spirit of the colleges. Investigation means the 
search after truth in every direction, and in this very 
necessary process all sorts of beliefs are subjected to 



close scrutiny. As a result, some beliefs must be aban- 
doned, others must be strengthened. This necessary 
attitude of the student mind is both beneficial and dan- 
gerous, for although it brings strength it may also bring 
doubts that are not discriminating. It is to this attitude of 
mind that the student body of to-day is peculiarly exposed, 
and from this body must come the leaders of the new 
generation, the mou'ders of opinion. The importance 
of the material possibilities of the next generation is not 
to be compared with that of the thought of the next 
generation concerning religion. The universities have 
been and must become more and more the great centers 
of influence on the thought of the world, and it is a 
matter of paramount importance that along these chan- 
nels of wide influence there shall flow the spirit of 
Christianity. 

Here then lies the special field of the church college; 
not to train up a certain class within certain narrow 
fields of thought, but to put the stamp of Christianitv 
upon all truth wherever found. Its function is to train 
not only for the ministry, but also for every honorable 
calling. It thus beeomes the natural conservator of the 
energies of our young people, that all this stored up 
energy may be directed by beliefs that are helpful to 
humanity. 

If this be true, it is absolutely necessary for the 
church college to be as liberal and Catholic in its spirit 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



and as generous in its facilities for work as other col- 
leges. If we would attract we must make ourselves 
attractive. In these days of eager investigation it is 
yearly becoming more difficult to attract strong students 
and competent teachers by narrow opportunities and 
meager equipment. 

The reason for denominational colleges in particular 
rather than church colleges in general simply arises 
from the necessity of utilizing alreadry existing organ- 
izations. 

From what has been said, it must not be inferred 
that the state colleges may not be full of the influence 
referred to. In the very nature of their organization, 
however, the spirit of Christianity is not the dominant 
one, and their inherent tendency is to assume a negative 
position in this regard. It is no more a part of their 
organization than it is of the organization of political 
parties. My point of comparison, therefore, is not in 
the nature of the educational work, or in the character 
of the men who conduct it, but in the purpose of the 
organization. I am very free to say that state and 
church colleges are mutually helpful, and that neither 
could hope to reach the full measure of its usefulness 
without the stimulating presence of the other. The 
state college, left alone, would tend towards a danger- 
ous iconoclasm; the church college isolated would tend 
towards a no less dangerous conservatism; but each 
checked by the other ean develop a system of education 
best adapted to the needs of mankind. 

I have every confidence that Lake Forest, so hap- 
pily situated, will seize her great opportunity, and will 
rapidly develop into a college so thoroughly equipped 
that the strongest students ami strongest teachers will 
be attracted by her great advantages. The denomina- 
tional feature may be subordinated, but the spirit of 
Christianity must dominate. John M. Coulter. 



ATHLETICS. 

REVIEW OF THE FOOT-BALL SEASON. 

In this week's issue there appears a picture of the 
foot-ball team, and it seems fitting that we should have 
a short review of the season's work. When school 
opened the prospects looked pretty blue and were con- 
sidered very poor until after we had met and vanquished 
Chicago. Our hopes rose high, only to fall when we 
learned that several of the men had been hurt in the 
game. Then came our defeat by Madison, which made 
things look still bluer. Then more new material was 
found which strengthened the team considerably. We 
next met Evanston and virtually defeated her, though 
tied in points. Then one of the old players, Mc- 
Gaughey, left school and a new man had to be found 
for his place. After having met Beloit and defeated 
her in a rather poor game and having defeated the Na- 
tional Bank Clerk's team, we met Evanston for the 
second time. One of the regular line men was laid off 
and two or three of the players had been hurt. We 



were defeated in a very loose game in which both teams 
ran up large scores. The second game with Chicago 
resulted in a tie. In this game a couple of men were 
laid up for the rest of the season. Then it was found 
two more of the players, for various reasons, could not 
accompany the team to Champaign. Two men were 
gotten from Rush Medical and a couple of new men 
developed. Everybody expected defeat, but we not 
only tied them but came within an ace of beating them. 

On the whole the team made a record to be proud 
of, coming out of the season with a record of 3 games 
won, 3 games tied, and 2 games lost. The team scored 
1 14 points and had 1 14 points scored against them. We 
were strong on team work and played a shifty 
style of game, but were wofully weak on end inter- 
ference and goal kicking. 

The financial outcome of the season was also more 
satisfactory than in any previous year, as is shown by 
the report of the Manager, which is published this w-'J : 



There was a meeting of the foot-ball team last 
Thursday evenining. F. A. Hayner was re-elected 
captain. Here there was a thorough discussion of the 
past season; there were several criticisms made among 
which was the following: It was suggested that the 
faculty be asked to have recitations begin at three o'clock 
instead of two, during the foot-ball season. The team 
could then practice earlier in the day and would not be 
troubled by darkness. 

Now that the foot-ball season is over attention 
should be at once turned toward developing a base-ball 
team. A captain should be elected and practice work 
in the "gym." should be begun at once. Lake Forest 
been wofully weak in base-ball in the past and it is 
time for her to "take a brace." 



MANAGER'S REPORT OF THE FOOT-BALL 
SEASON. 

Received by subscriptions $ 71 00 

Oct. 14. First Chicago game 50 00 

" 21. Madison " 146 55 

" 27. First Evanston " 1 15 60 

Nov. 6. Beloit " 45 75 

" 7. 1st Nat. Bank " 13 10 

" 11. 2d Evanston " 1 24 00 

" 18. 2d Chicago " 125 00 

" 30. Champaign " 168 45 

Total received $^59 45 

Total expenses 733 63 

Dec. 8. Balance on hand $125 S2 

EXPENDED. 
Coaching ... $ 65 00 

Foot-ball supplies 107 43 

Transportation 35 1 91 

Hotels and meals 112 53 

Printing and telegrams 19 52 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 5 

Guarantee to Beloit 40 00 two years he was Lake Forest's "heady" right end, but 

Doctor bills 7 5° 'his year he was forced to play the position of quarter- 

Foot-ball picture 20 00 back. All agree that he rilled the place perfectly. In 

Miscellaneous expenses 9 54 the face of many discouragements he brought the team 

$733 63 through a most successful season. Mr. Hayner deserves 

We also have on hand for next year: much credit for the hard work he has done. His 

1=; pairs of pants. thorough knowledge of the game and his playing abili- 

6 jackets. ties, together with his obliging disposition, make him 

9 sweaters. a model man for the responsible position of captain. 

S pairs of stockings. That the team appreciate his efforts is shown by the 

10 pairs shin-guards. fact that he was unanimously re-elected captain for next 

2 nose masks. year. 

3 rubber bandages. 

A. P. BOURNS, Manager. 




FRED A. HAYNER. 

The original of the above illustration needs no intro- 
duction to the foot-ball enthusiasts of this and neighbor- 
ing colleges. It is a good likeness of Lake Forest's 
doughty captain. Mr. Hayner is not only a phenomenal 
foot-ball player, but an excellent "base-ballist," and a 
good all-around athlete. He stands an even six feet and 
weighs about one hundred and sixty pounds. He is a 
member of the Junior class. Before entering college 
he played half-back for West Division High School. For 




MANAGER, A. P. BOURNS. 

While we are all praising the foot-ball team and 
captain for the good work of the season just closed, we 
should not forget to give a due measure of credit to the 
business manager of the eleven. He it is who secured 
dates, looked after the finances and attended to a thousand 
and one little things which are exceedingly important 
but which are not seen by the casual observer. Lake 
Forest has been fortunate this year in having for a foot- 
ball manager Mr. A. P. Bourns, a man who is at once 
clear-headed, conservative, and hard working. In the 
issue of October 10th, The Stentor gave a brief bio- 
graph)' of Mr. Bourns, so it is unecessary to speak 
again of his career, further than to say that he has al- 
ways been prominent in musical and oratorical lines, 
and in athletics and religious work. He has the honor 
of being L. F. U's most successful foot-ball manager. 



At Cornell a committee of nine members of the fa- 
culty are discussing the advisability of abolishing the 
degrees of Ph. B. and B. L. Great interest is felt in 
the outcome, as such a change would practically abolish 
Greek as a requirement for the degree A. B. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 
A 5EM SPREAD. 



ILLUSTRATED 







Oh! Oh! Girls 
look! I've got a 
box! a big one too! 
oh look! oh! (clap- 
ping the hands and 
smiling from ear to ear) how perfectly lovely ! Now 
we can have something to eat. You must all come up! 
Sneak up to-night about ten and we will have some 
fun! ! 

The above was the outburst of one of the girls, who 
recently received one of those joyous boxes. 'Tis eve- 
ning: — time, eleven. Place — Room 115. Clad in 
their variegated neglige evening robes, a spectator sees 
a dozen or more sfirls seated in various attitudes on the 



BY F. GRANT. 

immense bottles of olives. A third one carries off a pie 
and so on, each one getting something with which they 
are content. The box represents a typical grab-bag. 
There we leave them for a time, masticating with ap- 
palling rapidity the prizes they have captured. An 
hour later a teacher, disturbed in her slumbers, seeks 
to locate the scene of the disturbance. She gains en- 
trance to room 115, and there a most awful sight pre- 
sents itself. 

On the floor are scattered corks, bones, papers 
boxes, nutshells and everything imaginable. Bottles, 
long ago emptied, stand in rows upon the writing- 
desk and chairs. The guests had left a half an hour 
ago. In the center of the room stands the hostess, in a 
dejected attitude, her face the picture of dismay. Her 
arms hang listlessly at her side, as she looks in despair 
at the no* empty box and general condition of the 
room and wonders, " Does it pay ? " 




floor and all articles of furniture which will bear their 
weight. They sit with open mouths, their gaze im- 
movably fixed upon the center-piece — a pine box- 
Each one clutches in her hands knives, forks, can-open, 
ers and cork-screws, while she holds in her lap — for 
want of a plate — a piece of pasteboard, or it may be 
only the cover to a cast-off tin box. 

At one side stands the indispensable water-pitcher, 
filled to the brim, out of which all are expected to 
drink. All now in readiness for action, the recipient of 
the box addresses for a moment her eager, impatient 
guests, then with a dexterous sweep of the curling-iron 
forces open the "object of interest and attraction." 

A scream of delight resounds throughout the room, 
all with one accord leap from their seats, and, elbow- 
ing, pushing and pulling, force their way up to the 
box. Every one dives in and draws out, with many 
ohs and ahs, her favorite dish. One holds up a big tur- 
key; all gaze enraptured. Another has secured two 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 




Editor 


David Fales, Jr., '96, 


Assistant Editor and Town Topics 


W. B. Hunt, '94, > 
A. 0. Jackson, '96, ) 








Locals 


Prof. J. J. Halsey, 


- 


• Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


- 


Athletics 


(Jhas. Thom, '95, 


- 


Exchanges 


Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 


- 


Aletheian 


Miss Lucia Clark, ) 
JIiss Louise Conger, > 


- 


- Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, / 
B. S. Cutler, S 


- 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94. 


- 


Business Manager 


C B. Moore, '95, 


- 


Advertising 




TERMS 




Per Year, in advance, 


$1.50 


Single Copies, 




.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, III., as second-class matter. 

THE STENTOR extends best wishes for a 
"Merry Christmas" to all its readers. 
The holidays will soon be upon us when all 
will seek rest and good cheer. The editorial 
board of this paper are desirous of the former, 
so there will be no regular issue until the mid- 
dle of next month. 

* * 

FOUR extra pages and several illustrations 
are added to The Stentor this week in 
recognition of the holiday time. As a supple- 
ment we publish a cut of the foot-ball team, 
which is worth preserving. Among the unusual 
features of this number, the articles by Prof. 
Halsey and Dr. Coulter are worthy of special 
mention. 

* 

THE idea of a "triple league," to be com- 
posed of Lake Forest, Chicago and North- 
western Universities, mentioned by The Sten- 
tor three weeks ago, appears to meet with 
general favor. Such being the case, we suggest 
that delegates be chosen from each of the 
three schools named, to meet in Chicago before 
the Christmas holidays if possible, in order to 
discuss preliminary plans of organization. The 
league should be perfectly organized before 
the athletic season open next spring. 



HOW many of the students have read the 
President's message? How many are 
familiar with the important features of the 
new Wilson Tariff bill? We venture to saythat 
hardly twenty-five per cent of even our College 
students can answer these questions in the 
affirmative. Yet the President's message and 
the tariff bill are the two most important topics 
of the time, and to be ignorant of them is to be 
ignorant of current history. The same is true 
of other subjects which are daily discussed in 
the newspapers. The student who neglects 
this kind of reading makes a great mistake. 
The education which can be derived from the 
daily press is both theoretical and practical. 
Of course there is a great deal of matter con- 
tained in the newspapers which it is a waste of 
time to read, but the wise student soon learns 
to discriminate. The ability to read the news- 
papers skilfully and rapidly is a highly desir- 
able accomplishment, and should be cultivated 

until it becomes a habit. 

* * 
# 

IT is not too early to consider a plan for suit- 
ably celebrating Washington's birthday. 
It is a day which should be sacredly commem- 
orated by patriotic students, and if appropriate 
ceremonies are desired it is well to consider 
the matter in season. We ought to improve 
on former celebrations this year. There are 
two forms of exercises which suggest themsel- 
ves. The first is by "home talent" — for 
instance a joint debate. The other is to have 
some noted orator from abroad deliver an 
address. This is the method in vogue at the 
University of Michigan and other institutions. 
President Cleveland spoke at Ann Arbor two 
years ago. To be sure, Mr. Cleveland was 
not then occupying his four year's situation at 
the White House, so we could hardly hope to 
secure him for next February, but we would 
no doubt be willing to listen to some man a 
little less weighed down with the cares of state. 
Seriously speaking, however, an effort should 
be made to engage a good speaker to speak on 
some subject of political or historical interest 
on Washington's birthday. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

"Dave" Fales has been laid up for several days with 
his old ailment, tonsilitis. 

Miss Hayes, ex-95, wields the ferule in a little red 
school house near her home in Albion, Ind. 

Dr. Coulter attended the dedication of the new 
laboratory of Rush Medical College a week ago last 
Monday. 

The hand-ball court in the gymnasianm is at last 
an assured fact. It will be ready for use after the 
Christmas vacation. 

A number of Aletheians gave B. Fay Miles the "col- 
lege grip" Thanksgiving eve. We found him a de- 
lightful conversationalist. 

Arthur Reid of the Freshman class expects to 
spend the winter in Colorado, starting for the West im- 
mediately after the holidays. 

Mr. Carver was called home by the sudden death of 
his sister, on Tuesday last, at her home in Iowa. We 
extend to him our sympathy in his bereavement. 

It is said that H. W. Harris, the " College photo- 
grapher " is a robber, as he takes foot-ball pictures in 
broad day-light. Call and see him ; cell 1001, Academia 

The members of the foot-ball team will be given 
pictures of the team free. The pictures are excellent 
ones and would be an ornament to any room. Orders 
may be left with Mr. Bourns. 

A sleighing party consisting of members of the 
Waukegan High School went by the college on their 
way to the "Sem." last Tuesday evening but fell into 
mishaps at the open bridge at the Sem. ravine. 

Dr. Holmes of Chicago will address the student 
body Wednesday, December 13th, at 9 a. m. in the lec- 
ture room of the church. All interested in social or 
economic problems are invited to be present. 

Last Friday morning, in chapel, Prof. Walter Smith 
gave a brief synopsis of a lecture on Evolution and 
Ethics which was recently delivered in Oxford by 
Prof. Huxley. His criticism of the same was very in- 
teresting. 

Saturday evening was the occasion of another de. 
lightful sleigh-ride. Misses Miller, Rosalind Brown, 
Mellen and Mercer, and Messrs. Marshall, Curry, 
George Rice and Herbert Moore, chaperoned by Miss 
Sizer, made up the company. 

Prof. Stuart entertained the students last Wednes- 
day morning with a talk on the debt modern civiliza- 
tion owes to Roman influence. It was a characteristic 
talk and brought back to some of us very vividly class 
room scenes in which Roman " disciplina " played a 
large part. 

Owing to the death of his father, Mr. Riley has can- 



celled his dates for this month. The Aletheian Society 
is sorry to announce that his entertainment will not be 
given Wednesday' as was expected. Since the later 
date he offers is not at all suitable, the society dropped 
the matter entirely. 

The first number of the Weekly Bulletin, a paper 
published by students of the Academy, appeared on 
Monday, Dec. 4th. It is a neat and well printed sheet, 
containing three pages of reading matter and one page 
of advertisements. The Stentor extends a cordial 
welcome to the new-comer. 

Dr. Coulter spent Saturday and Sunday in Madison 
delivering three addresses during his stay. One was 
before the faculty and trustees on " University Admin- 
istration, " another on "Intercollegiate Y. M. C. A. 
work," and the third before the "Madison Bible 
School " which meets everv Sundav. 

As soon as it was rumored about the College halls 
that the Whitcomb Riley and Douglas Sherley enter- 
tainment would not be given, several young men made 
great haste to make engagements for said entertain- 
ment. When the announcement was publicly made, 
none were apparently more surprised than they. 

The young ladies of the Freshman class entertained 
their young gentlemen class-mates at Ferry Hall Friday 
evening. Thefeatmeof the evening was a quiz on 
the U. S. mintage. Mr. Ritchy succeeded in evolving 
the greatest number of oddities from a penny, thus 
gaining the first prize. Mr. Halbert captured the 
" booby." Music and refreshments completed a most 
enjoyable coming. 

Prof. Jack's Rhetoric class completed last week the 
reading and discussion of original narrative and descrip- 
tive essays written by members of the class. Prof. 
Jack pronounced the work as a whole as most gratify- 
ing. Mr. Lee's production deserves a special mention. 
The Rhetoric class will shortly take up practical work 
in the line of debates. The leading questions of the 
day will be brought up for discussion, and already three 
subjects are being prepared, to be debated before the 
holidays. 

The C. G's were highly delighted last week at the 
prospect of a snow-fight betwten Sophomore and 
Freshman girls. '96 gave the challenge, and after due 
deliberation Misses Keener and Darby were appointed 
captains, Miss Smith was chosen as umpire and Mist 
McKee as referee. The eventful day dawned brigh s 
and cold but no Freshmen appeared on the scene of 
battle. The girls of '96 certainly showed a commend- 
able sprint in the matter and it is to be deplored that 
the new coiners do not evince more interest in athletics 

The Longfellow Evening in the Aletheian Society 
proved most enjoyable and profitable. The roll-call 
was responded to by familiar quotations. The program 
consisted of a sketch of Longfellow's life by Miss Smith, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



reading by Miss Keener, and recitation by Miss Phelps. 
These literary numbers were interpetsed by vocal 
renditions of some of Lonfellow's beautiful poems by 
Misses Brown and Keener. The business meeting was 
of more than usual interest. (All work and no play, 
etc., is our motto). The new constitution was adopted 
and will be put in force at the next meeting of the 
society. 

At a meeting of the directors of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation, Monday, Dec. 4, the report of the Committee 
on Entertainment was received and its recommendations 
approved. It favored the rendition of an original bur- 
lesque play to be given near the end of the first sem- 
ester. On motion power was granted this committee 
to make all arrangements. T. H. Jones was chosen as 
busine-s manager of the committee. Base-ball interests 
were fully discussed and H. Goodman was for a third 
time elected to the management of our base-ball inter- 
ests. Messrs. Bourns, Crozier and Prof. Bridgman were 
appointed to look after the "triangular league," i. e.,the 
league between Chicago, Northwestern and Lake Forest 
Universities. The report of A. P. Bourns, manager of 
the foot-ball team, showed the past season has been a 
financial success. 

The last programme of this term before the Zeta 
Epsilon Society was presented on Friday evening, Dec- 
ember S. The debate, " Resolved that we gain as 
much from environment in college life as from study, " 
proved both interesting and profitable. The speakers 
on the affirmative were E. A. Drake and C. B. Moore; 
on the negative, J. C. Lininger and E. E. Vance. 
The judges reported two for the affirmative and one 
for the negative. A. P. Bourns favored the Society 
with vocal music and O. H. Swezey read a paper on 
"Boulders." Then Wm. B. Hunt for the affirmative 
and A. Habezli for the negative strove in impromptu 
debate on the weighty economic question. " Resolved 
that the tax — 'tacks' on a long tailed dog should be 
greater than the tax on a short tailed dog." The 
judges decided three for the affirmative. F. A. Hay- 
ner then read an original Christmas story. 



SENIOR CLUB. 
The latest organization is the "Senior Club," com- 
posed of members of the Senior classes of the Col- 
lege and Seminary. It is the first organization of its 
kind in the history of the University, though it is mod- 
elled somewhat after the plan of the "University Club," 
its object being literary and social culture. A prelimi- 
nary meeting was held last Thursday evening in the 
Zeta Epsilon Hall. Mr. Goodman presided as tempo- 
rary chairman. Mr. Bourns sang a solo, improvised for 
the occasion, after which plans of organization were 
discussed. It was decided to place the meetings in 
charge of a committee of three, who are to make all 
necessary arrangements for each meeting. The club 
will meet every two weeks. The first regular meeting 
will be held on Thursday evening, January 1 ith, in the 
Athenean hall. 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Alta Barnum, '93, of Rockfoid, spent Sunday 
with her sister. 

The officers of Kappa Phi will not be elected till 
next term. 

We are glad to say that Miss Condon is recovering 
from her severe illness. 

Miss Glenrose Bell, win attended school here two 
years ago, visited Miss Mcintosh Saturday. 

Miss Florence Pride entertained her sister, Miss 
Pride, and Miss Hudson, of Kenwood, on Friday. 

Miss Titus gave a very delightful party in her 
room on Saturday evening, in honor of Miss Birnum. 

Miss Hull, who h is had charge of the French 
classes since Miss Norton's illness, will remain until 
next term . 

The chapel exercises this week were made attrac- 
tive By music by Prof. Eager and the recitation of 
"Columbus" by Miss Lita Stoddard. 

The resignation of Miss Alice Conger has been 
handed in and accepted by the board. Miss Sizer will 
take charge of her classes for the rest of the year. 

The officers of Rketoricals "A" for next term are 
as follows: 

President, - - Miss Delia Stoddard 

Vice-President, .... Miss Linsay 

Treasurer, - - - - - - Miss Porter 

Critic, .-..-. Miss Clark 

Owing to the ineradicable tendency to hold recep- 
tions and have foot races in the halls, Dr. Seeley thinks 
that the "little green chair" can no longer fulfill its 
mission in life adequately. lie proposes to have along, 
lank, hard bench placed in the office, on which naughty 
bad girls will have to sit and gaze at the "twenty-nine 
diplomas a-hanging on the wall." 

Sleigh rides were the popular thing last week. 
Monday evening a party of about ten couples chartere 1 
a bob and went off (with and on) a toot. A supper at 
Matthews' was a special feature. One given by Mr. 
Wells' Sunday School class, Thursday evening, for a 
few of the town and Seminar) 7 girls, proved a decided 
success. The party drove to Highland Park where an 
oyster supper was served. 

On Tuesday, the Seniors, excepting one, felt the 
necessity of going into mourning and attired them- 
selves in gowns suited to the forthcoming event. At 
3:30 p. m. the essays were read before a committee of 
the faculty. During the year each member must write 
three essays, which, with the delivery, count fifty per 
cent, of the standing, the other fifty being the average 
attained in other studies. The class honors will be 
given to the two whose rank, as a whole, is highest. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The Seniors of the College and Seminary, with 
their usual modesty and desire to shrink from public 
notice, have heretofore restrained from mentioning the 
fact that a literary and social club was to be organized, 
but as the initiative meeting was held Thursday even- 
ing in one of the College halls, concealment is no longer 
possible. Great enthusiasm was shown by most of the 
members and the club bids fair to be a success. Reg- 
ular meetings will be held during the rem tinder of the 
year. 

Wednesday afternoon the Rhetoricals "A" gave 
the following program: 

Vocal solo, - - Miss Bartels 

Essay, .'.... Miss Davidson 

Music, ------ Miss Schell 

News of the week. ... - Miss Wells 

Vocal solo, ----- Miss Clark 

Reading, ----- Miss Syvertson 

Recitation, ----- Miss Baker 

Duet, - Misses Lincoln and Porter 

We are sorry that the name for this society cannot be 
decided until next term. 



THANKSGIVING NOTES. 
Misses Keener and Wetherhold attended the Bos. 
tonians. 

Miss Phelps was entertained in Rockford. 

Misses Gilleland, MacLean and Hodge were "at 
home." 

Miss McKee ate turkey with friends in Hammond. 

Miss Oberne's home on the North-side was the 
scene of a merry Thanksgiving company. Miss Smith 
and Fitz. Randolph were among the favored guests. 

Miss Giles gave an infornal party at her home 
Thanksgiving evening. 

Miss Skinner attended parties, candy pulls, etc. 

Miss Brown spent the vacation with relatives in the 
city. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

[Owing to circumstances which cannot now be ex- 
plained, we have not received the usual news items 
from the Academy this week. We trust the omission 
will not occur again. Ed.] 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mrs. and Miss Florence Latimer received at five 
o'clock tea Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Chapin gave a sleigh ride Friday afternoon to 
the students and alumni of the Alcott School. 

The wedding of Prof. Walter Smith and Mrs. 
Ralston will take place Tuesday, December 26th. 



Mr. George Riddle reads selections from the "An- 
tigone" Tuesday evening, December 12, before the Art 
Institute, and Miss Ethel Roe, of Chicago, furnishes 
music. The Art Institute meets this week at the resi- 
dence of Mr. E. J. Warner. 

Dr. and Mrs. McClure gave a dinner and reception 
to Dr. and Mrs. Coulter at the Manse Thursday even- 
ing. At the dinner were, besides Dr. and Mrs. Coulter, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Durand, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Durand. 



ORGAN RECITAL. 
Mr. W. H. Humiston gave an organ recital in the 
Presbyterian Church, on Monday evening, December 
1 ith. He was assisted by the soprano of the Unity 
Church, Chicago, Miss Kathryn Meeker. The pro- 
gramme was as follows: 

Triumphal March, - - Michael Costa 

March of the Magi Kings, - - Th. Di.bois 

Nuptial Song. 
Fantasie on Themes from Gounod's Faust — 

— Clarence Eddy 
A Norwegian Song, ... - Henri Loge 

Miss Kathryn Meeker. 
Cappricio, - Ed. Lemaigre 

Offertoire in D flat, op. S., - - Th. Salome 

Prayer and Cradle Song, - - Alex. Guilmant 

Invocation in B flat. 
Pilgrim's Chorus, - - - Richard Wagner 

From Tannhauser. 
Romannce, "Evening Star," - From Tannhauser 
Solvejg's Lied, - - Ed. Grieg 

Miss Kathryn Meeker. 
Bridal Song from "The Country Wedding" — 

Carl Goldmark 
Gavotte from Mignon, - - Ambroise Thomas 

Reverie and Romance, - - Robert Schumann 

Melody and Intermezzo, - Horatio W. Parker 

Traume ( Dreams), a studv to "Tristan and Isolde." — 

— Richard Wagner 
Miss Kathryn Meeker. 
Overture Masaniello, - - D. F. E. Auber 

National Anthem "America." 



ALUMNI. 

Bad news comes from Del Norte, Colo., where on 
Thanksgiving Day the church building of the congre- 
gation to which Mr. Stroll ministers was destroyed by 
fire. 

Geo. W. Wright, '92, was recently presented with 
a handsome gold watch and chain bv the session of the 
41st Street Presbyterian Church, Chicago, in recogni- 
tion of his aid during the months that the church was 
without a pastor. Mr. Wright has lately been filling 
the pulpit of the Norwood Park Presbyterian Church. 

J. H. McVav, of '91, has been appointed Instructor 
in Histology and Microscopy in the Chicago Homoeo- 
pathic Medical College. Mr. McVay has been for two 
years an assistant in the work in which he is now ad- 
vanced, and the honor of both the original appointment 
as well as of the recent promotion is great when one 
recalls that he is still a student in that institution. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ii 






EXCHANGES. 

THE EDITOR'S FRIENDS. 

In reverie sat the editor 

And bit his finger tips, 
His copy must be in at four — 
His pen in ink he dips, 
And holds it there, 
And wonders where 
He'll find his scattered wits. 

The door is opened, 'tis a friend 

Who, since he'd passed that way, 
Will drop in and a minute spend 
In chatting if he may ; 
A thing or two 
He'll tell him, too, 
That he's heard people say. 

" Vonr paper is not just what they 

Had hoped you'd make of it, 
I think you readily will say 
It would improve a bit 

With more that's new 
And lively, too, 
And more of jokes and wit." 

The editor smiled meekly at 

His friend, a deep sigh drew, 

And timidly suggested that 

He write a thing or two. 

"Not I, oh no! 

But I must go, 

So here's good luck to you." 

Then soon a worthy class-mate 

Dropped in to see his paid, 

And asked him if the "College World" 

Came cheapest by the yard. 

"Had he the time 

To write a line?" 

No, he was studying hard. 

And soon another rap was heard 

Upon the study door, 

But straightway rose the editor 

Add tiptoed 'cross the floor, 

Right fiercely he 

Did turn the kev, 

And opened it no more. — Ex. 

The ladies of the Harvard Annex will probably re- 
ceive the regular college degree this year. 

An attempt to introduce Biblical in the curriculum 
of Kansas University will probably be successful this 
year. No course in Biblical has hitherto been offered. 

This clipping from the Sequoia will be of interest 
to students wbo remember Prof. Sanford: 

Prof. Fernando Sanford has discovered a method 
by which photographs cau be taken without light. The 



photographic plate is insetted into an electric condenser, 
one plate of which is composed of the metallic surface 
to be photographed. The condenser is charged and 
discharged very rapidly and the vibrations, which are 
set up between the condensed plates, produce the same 
effect upon the sensitized plate that would be produced 
by light waves. The negative is then developed as 
when it has been exposed to light. So far only coins, 
or metallic surfaces with raised or depressed figures 
have been photographed. This discovery may prove a 
very important one to photographic science. 



THREE COLLEGE TEAMS COMPARED. 

In discussing a foot-ball league between Chicago, 
Lake Forest and Northwestern universities, a compari- 
son of the respective foot-ball teams is interesting, for 
the three colleges are so widely different in character- 
istics that the equality of their teams is surprising. Lake 
Forest has about one hundred students to draw from 
for her team. Evanston, with ten times that number, 
has the advantage over Chicago "in experience, while 
the South Side university, with as many students, has 
the continual presence of the famous end-rush, Stagg, 
as a coach. Evanston has been favored this vear with 
the coaching of several Eastern cracks. Lake Forest has 
had no regular coach. From the players of the teams 
but few stars can be stlected, and the power of all the 
elevens rests entirely on their team work. Jewett, for 
Evanston, has won a reputation by his runs and by his 
defensive game as well; the record of tackles by Cap- 
tain Hayner, of Lake Forest, is almost phenomenal. 
For Chicago to Neel and Ravcroft are due honors. 
Each team has played two games with each of the 
others, with the remarkable outcome that each team has 
finished first. All had the ssme standing at the end of 
the season. This unique recoid was made possible by 
the three tie games played, each eleven tying one game 
with each of the other two. The whole series, in fact, 
was a general merry-go-round, as the following record 
shows: Chicago lost one to Lake Forest and tied one; 
won one from Evanston and tied one; Lake Forest lost 
one to Evanston add tied one. North Western leads in 
points, having scored 62, Lake Forest follows closely 
with ^8, Chicago next with 30. Lake Forest leads in 
touchdowns, having pushed the ball under the goal 
posts 12 times, while Evanston did the same thing 1 1 
times, Chicago having a record of 6. To Lake Forest 
belongs the only shutout. Lake Forest beat Chicago 
10 to o. 

It is easy to see that such closely matched teams as 
these, if formed into a league, would furnish Chicago 
and her vicinity with exciting foot-ball and would put 
up a Thanksgiving game due in time to equal those of 
the East in interest. For these are the colleges which 
are destined to be the center of Chicago athletic inter- 
ests and of Chicago societv. — Chicago Evening Post. 



12 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




voted to the Dental Hospital. The chief 
led ure room has a seating capacity for 
four hundred and fifty students. There 
is also a dissecting room thoroughly 
equipped with all the requisites for the 
study of human anatomy. 

There are Histological, Chemical, Bac- 
teriological Laboratories, also Labora- 
tories for the study of Operative and Pro- 
thetic Technics, and one for the construc- 
tion of artificial dentures. 

There are also reading rooms, a library 
and museum for the students, waiting 
rooms for the patients, and, in fact, every- 
thing else that will promote the interests 
of the different classes for whose benefit 
the college building will be provided. 



DR. J. W. BROPHY. 

We take pleasure in presenting to our 
readers this week a picture of Truman 
W. Brophv, M. D., D. D. S., Dean of the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, the 
Dental Department of Lake Forest Uni- 
versity. Dr. Brophy is one of Chicago's 
leading Dental Surgeons and it is largelv 
due to his push and enegy that the col- 
lege has come to take place in the first 
rank of Ametican Dental Colleges. 



THE NEW DENTAL COLLEGE. 

The new college building occupies a 
prominent position among a group of four- 
teen others, comprising medical colleges, 
hospitals and schools. 

The lot on which the building stands 
has a frontage of eighty -five feet, and a 
depth of one hundred and twenty feet. It 
is a five story and basement structure, the 
basement and first story being of rock- 
faced Bedford stone, and the superstruc- 
ture of pressed biick and terracotta, with 
terra-cotta trimmings. 

The building has two entrances, the 
main one through a large cut stone door- 
way surmounted by a stone arch beauti- 
fully ornamented with carved work. The 
interior is finished in hard-wood accord- 
ing to the latest idea of elegance, conven- 
ience and comfort. 

The entire five floors of the building 
are divided up into lecture rooms, class 
rooms, clinic rooms, etc., with the ex- 
ception of the second floor, which is de- 




THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
C o 1 1 ege. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. .0. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 

Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY i6, 1894 



No. 12 



BIG COTTONWOOD RAVINE. 

A BIT OF LOCAL DESCRIPTION'. 

Big Cottonwood Ravine is one of the man}' pictur- 
esque deep ravines that intercept the high bluff border- 
ing Lake Michigan in this locality. It is situated about 
one mile south of Lake Forest, extending from the 
Northwestern R.R. track to the lake. At its origin 
near the R.R. it is merely a narrow ditch which one 
can easily step over, or jump across, but as it proceeds 
toward the lake, it gradually and constantly widens and 
deepens until at its mouth it is fifty or more feet deep. 
Its course is very winding, and it has many branches. 
The sides everywhere are steeply inclined. 

In a rocky bed at the bottom of the ravine Hows a 
small stream which has its source in the numerous wet, 
springy places that are found along the sloping sides. 
This little stream barely exists in the dry summer sea- 
son, and in the autumn it becomes nearly filled with 
leaves, yet a few minnows manage to live in it and in 
the summer time may be seen sporting in the deeper 
pools along its course. 

The sides of the ravine are heavily wooded, as well 
as the adjacent land on either side. Many are the fallen 
and decaying trunks lying around everywhere. In 
some places several are piled together where thev have 
fallen across one another; others are leaning with their 
tops in the branches of standing trees; and yet others 
lie across the ravine near the bottom, with one end rest- 
ing on one side, the other on the other side, thus form- 
ing natural bridges. The smoothness of the upper sur- 
face of some of these indicate that they are used as such 
by the inhabitants of the adjoining woods. 

A person down in the ravine can not see very far in 
any direction, when the trees are in leaf, on account of 
its winding course and the tangles produced by the fal- 
len trees and underbrush. Even thi view upwards is 
obstructed, for the branches of the trees on either side 
mingle overhead. From the wild appearance given by 
these features, one can easily imagine that he is in some 
far-off region unexplored by man, and the next idea 
may be the possibility of meeting some wild beast of 
the woods, especially as he sees under the roots of a 
large oak near by, the opening of a burrow of consid- 
erable size. But he need not fear. The burrow is 
only the home of a woodchuck, or that unmention- 
able black-and-white nocturnal animal, which some 
dog has been trying to dig out. Several other burrows 
may be seen at diffeient places on the sloping sides of the 
ravine, entering the ground beneath, or among the roots 
at the lower side of some large tree, thus insuring bet- 
ter security for the occupant. 

To any one interested in nature, this is always an in- 



teresting place to visit. It is especially so to the botan- 
ist during the- spring and summer. Many plants and 
shrubs are found here that are peculiar to such places 
and are found in no other. The trees are mostly the 
same species that are found growing in the woods of 
the vicinity. Some of the more abundant species are: 
the red, scarlet, and white oaks, sugar maple, wild 
cherry, white ash, hickory, linden, poplar, hornbeam, 
ironwood, and red cedar. 

Not more than half a mile up the ravine, from its 
mouth, stands a gigantic cottonwood tree; and it is from 
this that the ravine receives its name. This venerable 
tree grows from a small level area near the bottom 
of the ravine, and rears its lofty top to the height of So 
feet or more. It forks at the height of 20 feet, and it is 
about 10 feet higher to the first branches. The 
branches are large and few in number, so that the tree 
has not a dense or spreading top. It is a favorite haunt 
for squirrels, for in the forks of the large upper boughs 
they are secure from the hunter's gun, as I ascertained 
one day to my camplete satisfaction, or rather dissatis- 
faction. It is so high to the leaves that their size and 
form can not be distinguished by one standing on the 
ground beneath. From the size of its trunk and the 
appearance of its bark, this must be a vers' old tree. 
The old, dead bark is in longitudinal ridges, with cre- 
vices between, three or four inches deep. There are 
three other smaller trees of this kind not far from this 
one; its children, as it were. 

As we near the lake, the paper, or canoe birch be- 
comes abundant on the sides of the ravine. Their 
straight, white trunks appear like ghosts of a former 
generation of trees. Of the shrubs composing the un- 
derbrush, witch-hazel, that shrub which has the pecu- 
liar characteristic of blossoming in the fall, after shed- 
ding its leaves, is the chief constituent. Fresh yellow 
blossoms may be found on it even later than the middle 
of November. Another shrub, the oleaster, goes to the 
other extreme and blossoms before its leaves appear in 
the spring. Mingled with these are several specimens 
of dog-wood; one, the red ozier, is conspicuous by the 
redness of its straight new shoots. The wild sarsapa- 
rilla vine is found growing here also, and climbing over 
and among many of the old logs is the poison-ivy vine, 
which must be carefully avoided by those who are 
liable to be affected by it. 

Many kinds of flowers beautify this ravine during the 
spring and summer. First to appear in the spring are 
the hepaticas, soon followed by the bloodroot, bellwort, 
wood beony, mitre-wort, rue, white trillium, and many 
others, keeping up the succession throughout the sea- 
son. In early summer this is an excellent place to 
gather the large, sweet-scented yellow lady's- slipper. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The south side of the ravine, being shaded from the 
sun's rays, is damp, and many kinds of moss cover the 
ground, forming in places a velvety green carpet. 
Ferns also abound, the delicate maidenhairs, numerous 
varieties of wood ferns, and the large brakes. In some 
of the wet, springy places are large patches of the ever- 
green horsetail, or scouring-rushes. Their straight 
green stalks are about two feet tall, and stand erect, 
and about as close together as they can grow. Also in 
the ground in similar places are delicate green liver- 
worts. 

With all this profusion and variety of vegetable life, 
animal life is not lacking here. In summer, many- 
kinds of songbirds enliven anil relieve the solitude of 
this wild place. The warblers build their pensile nests 
i n't he drooping shrubbery ; the water thrush may be 
seen flitting amongst the overhanging roots along the 
brink of the stream ; the wood thrush may be seen here 
also, though one is more likely to hear its rich melody 
than to see the bird itself, for it is rather shy. Running 
up and down the tree-trunks and along the branches 
in search of insects in the crevices of the bark, is seen 
the lively little nuthatch, and on a dead limb in the top 
of an adjacent tree, a woodpecker is industriously ham- 
mering away, intent on securing a delicious fat worm 
for his dinner. The noisy crows make their presence 
known where they are gathering for a feast around a 
carcass that someone has thrown into the ravine. Grey 
and fox squirrels nest in the trees overhead, and the 
sprightly little ground squirrel may be seen frisking 
about among the old logs. 

In conclusion: Here one may see nature in her 
natural state; here the beauties, wildness and grandeur 
of nature are combined ; and this and similar ravines form 
one of the chief characteristics of this bluff region of 
Lake Michigan. 

O. II. Swezey, 'g6. 



THE ILLINOIS STATE TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 
AT SPRINGFIELD, DEC. 27, 25 AND 29. 

The committee appointed at Galesburg to secure a 
union meeting of the colleges and secondary schools of 
the State, for which Principal Smith of the Academy 
was chairman, was successful at the State Teachers' 
Association, held in Springfield during the holidays, in 
securing one union session of the different sections re- 
presenting these interests. 

At this session there was presented by a committee 
of the Secondary schools a uniform course of study for 
the high schools of the State; and by a committee of 
the college section minimum requirements for admis- 
sion to college. These requirements were discussed in 
the joint session by represedtatives of both sections, 
and after conference between the two committees a 
modification of the two reports was adopted by the 
separate sections, requiring three years of preparation 



in the Secondary schools. This three years course re- 
quires the arithmetic and U. S. history work to be com- 
pleted in the grammar school, and makes some conces- 
sions to the high scoools with the hope of bringing them 
up within a year or two to a four years' course of pre- 
paration. 

This Galesburg committee also secured a joint meet- 
ing of the college, principals and High School sections 
for next year. This is considered an important step in 
advance, the aim being to secure a greater sympathy 
and mutual helpfulness between the colleges and sec- 
ondary schools of the State. 

At the Thursday afternoon session of the college 
section President Coulter read a piper upon " College 
Administration" which awakened great interest and led 
to fruitful discussion. He was asked to publish it in 
some such magazine as the Forum, but has not yet de- 
cided to do so. 

This meeting of the association was an exceptionally 
good one and the college section had one of the most 
fully attended and most interesting sessions in its history. 
It is hoped that more of the Lake Forest faculty may 
be able to attend another year. Representatives were 
present from Illinois, Knox, Schurtliff and Wheaton 
Colleges, and Blackburn, Chicago and Lake Forest 
Universities. 



BIOLOGICAL CLUB. 

The interest in the meetings of the Biological Club 
is keeping pace with the growing excellence of the 
programs. A plan was recently introduced to hold 
supplementary meetings subject to the call of the pro- 
gram" committee, the first of which occurred Thursday, 
January nth. Professor Locy favored the club with 
a review of his recent paper before the American 
Morphological Society on the "Origin of the Pineal 
Gland in the Shark." As a result of this investigation, 
Prof. Locy is able to give to science a discovery that 
will clear up much of the vagueness in reference to that 
organ. He has found accessory depressions similar in 
origin and structure to those giving rise to the true 
eyes and lying just back of them in the neural furrow. 
Two of these optic vescicles give rise to their point of 
contact on the median line of the brain to a single pro- 
tuberance which develops into the pineal gland. This 
explains awav the seeming contradiction between this 
impaired optic gland and the paired character of all 
other organs of special sense. The common origin of 
the true eves with the pineal gland, its prominence 
with the lower vertebrates and its gradual deterioration 
in man and the higher animals calls up the startling 
suggestion that the vertebrates have proceeded from 
multiple-eyed ancestral forms. 

Dr. Coulter set foith some recently evolved theories 
on homologies in the cactus family. He dwelt upon 
the difficulty experienced in drawing any safe generic 
distinctions, owing to intergrading forms. Tubercle 
grooves and relative position of the flower to the spines 
were shown to be very important as illustrated by 
Mamillaria, Anhalorium anil Echinocactus. A clear 
understanding of these relations goes far toward clear- 
ing up the heretofore doubtful position of the Anhalo- 
rium. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ATHLETICS. 

Now is the time when work should begin on base- 
ball and track athletics. Light work should be com- 
menced in gymnasium in order to get the men seasoned 
for the outdoor work which will begin next term. We 
have a hand-ball court in the gymnasium, and all the 
base-ball candidates should be required to use it. This 
develops the muscles, cultivates quickness and hardens 
the hands. It is a game which is played by all profes- 
sional ball-players during the winter months. Then 
later in the term practice should begin with a regular 
baseball and kept up until spring. Lake Forest ha s 
never had a very high reputation for base ball, and she 
should begin the work of building up one. There is 
some good material in the school, which ought to 
develop into good team. 

In track athletics Lake Forest lias done scarcely 
any thing, leaving out Mr. Rossiter's good work. There 
is a field day every spring, but only a few train for it, 
and these few without any assistance from a coach. 
The result is that a list of records are made which is a 
disgrace to have published in the papers. If the men 
who intend to take part on field day will begin work 
now, the result will be very much different. For the 
runners there is a track in the gvmnasium. This, of 
course, is not long enough to permit sprinting, but for 
the distance run it is all right. There is plentv of ap- 
paratus for jumping and hurdling, and this should be 
practiced steadily until field day. 

A hand-ball court was put into the gymnasium dur- 
ing the holidays. It of course interferes some with the 
other exercises, but the chief trouble is that after five 
o'clock no one can use it these nights, because it is so 
dark. A great many fellows have recitations until four 
o'clock. Then the Academy classes come for three- 
quarters of an hour. If the large chandeliers could be 
lighted, it would do away with this trouble. But if 
they are not, the court cannot be used enough to make 
it worth the trouble of building. 

Evanston at a recent meeting appointed a committee 
to confer with Lake Forest and Chicago in regard to 
an indoor athletic meet at Tattersal's, in Chicago. 
This would be an excellent thing, and should be warm- 
ly supported bv Lake Forest. Not only would it 
create interest in this line of athletics, but it would get 
the men in training for next spring. In connection 
with the above it might be well to ask if anything has 
been done about organizing the three-cornered league. 
This is a matter which should not be given up without 
making a great effort to bring about the league. 

A Hare-and-Hounds club is being organized in 
College and Academy. Runs will be made once or 
twice a week until the spring term, when there will be 
a 9eries of runs for prizes given by the athletic associa- 
tion. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. Butler is recovering from an attack of pneu- 
monia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Durand arid Miss Durand will 

leave for California Wednesday, Jan. 17th, to remain 
until spring. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Durand, Mr. and Mrs 
Shirley V. Martin and Miss Bertha Hands, are in 
Pasadena, California. 

In the absence of Mayor Durand, it will be neces 
sarv for the aldermen to elect a temporary chairman to 
attend to the interests of the city. 

The iron bridge over the Seminary ravine will, in 
all probability, be finished by lanuary 30. At this 
writing most of the iron girders and frame-work are 
already in position. 

The Art Institute meets this evening at the home of 
Mr. Albert Cobb. Prof. Stuart will read a paper on 
the Latin Drama. There will afterwards be repre- 
sented a portion of Plautus' comedy, "The Captives." 
This last part of the program will be carried out bv 
Messrs. J. M. Coulter, Jr., Andrew Jackson and David 
Fales, Jr., who have been preparing under the supervi- 
sion of Prof. Stuart. 

Last Friday afternoon and evening Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Smith held their wedding reception. Miss 
Stone, Miss Hofer, Miss Torrey and Miss Grace Stan- 
lev, were among: those who assisted in receiving; and 
serving refreshments. The house was decorated with 
greens and flowers. Prof, and Mrs. Smith will also be 
at home Fridays in February. 

Commander C. S. Gifford, of the English navy, 
was made a commander of the Bath in the distribution 
bv the Ministry of New Year's honors. Mrs. Gifford 
was formerly well known in Lake Forest as Miss Elbe 
Neef — Mr. Taber now occupies the old Neef home — 
and she will be remembered by many of the alumni, 
ss it was through her agency that the bell was secured 
which now hangs in the College belfry. 



Among the notices of our Christmas issue we are 
pleased to quote the following from our valued ex- 
change, the College Rambler : 

"The Christmas number of The University 
Stentor is most artistically gotten up. Besides a full 
page photogravure of the foot-ball team, it contains 
several half tone illustrations. The literary department, 
which is as well taken care of, contains two able articles 
on "How to Read" and "The Denominational College." 
"A Sem Spread" is the title of a humorous piece which 
is illustrated with some comic wood cuts. Altogether 
it ii production which would do credit to an}- college 
in the country." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, ) 

A. O. Jackson, '96, i 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 

Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 
Miss F. Somerville, i 
Miss Mabel Palmer, f 
S. E. Gruenstein, I 

B. S. Cutler, S 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 

- Alumni 

Athletics 

Exchanges 

Aletheian 

- Ferry Hall 

Academy 

Business Manager 
Advertising 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



|1.50 
.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 

WORK. 

BRIEFLY stated, the chief end of a liberal 
education, as generally understood, is to 
train the powers of the mind. But more than 
that, our university course should inculcate 
what Ruskin calls ". the gospel of work," and 
especially a love of work for its own sake. In 
this connection we make a few excerpts from 
the College Rambler. 

To teach young men to think is well; to 
teach them to act isbetter. They should learn 
in school and college the secret of accomplish- 
ment, how to escape discouragement and de- 
feat, how to achieve success that will endure. 
College training ought to enable us to over- 
come a dislike of work. The element of in- 
ertia is pretty strong in most people, and they 
accept work as a necessity which they would 
gladly escape. Since it is a necessity, a true 
philosophy would teach us to welcome and 
enjoy, not to resist it. As suggestions for 
making the work of each day effective and 
easy, the following are given: Keep a little in 
advance of your work. Gain your leisure be- 
fore you take it. Learn concentration. If 
you can prepare a lesson thoroughly in one 
hour don't spend two hours upon it. Compel 



your mind to put forth its best energy. Permit 
no interruption while you are engaged in study 
Don't be baffled. Train yourself to succeed 
not to fail. If you cannot surmount obstacles 
in one way. try another. Exert that strength 
will which is a pre-requisite of success in any 
undertaking:. 



* * 

* 



IT is always interesting to get a wise critic's 
idea as to what are the best books. In the 
December Century a hitherto unpublished 
essay by James Russell Lowell names five whom 
he considered the indispensable authors. They 
are, first, Homer, who has used types so uni 
versal and cosmopolitan that they are 
equally true in all languages. "Nowhere," says 
Lowell, "is the purely natural man presented to 
us so nobly and sincerely as in the Iliad and 
Odyssey. Not far below these is the 'Divinia 
Commedia' of Dante, in which the history of 
the spiritual man is sketched with equal com- 
mand of material and grandeur of outline. 
'Don Quixote' stands upon the same level, 
and receives the same universal appreciation. 
Here we have the spiritual and natural man 
set before us in humorous contrast. In the 
knight and his squire Cervantes has typified 
the two opposing poles of our dual nature — 
the imagination and the understanding as they 
appear in contradiction. 'Faust' gives us the 
natural history of the human intellect, Mephis- 
topheles being merely the projected impersona- 
tion of that skepticism which is the invariable 
result of a purely intellectual culture. These four 
books are the only ones in which universal facts 
of human nature and experience are ideally 
represented. The)' can, therefore, never be 
displaced. Further, these books are not 
national but human, and record certain phases 
of man's nature, certain stages of his moral 
progress. The)' are gospels in the lay bible of 
the race. It will remain for the future poet to 
write the epic of the complete man, as it remains 
for the future world to afford the example of 
his entire and harmonius development." 

It is noticeable that Lowell places Shakes- 
peare below these four, although he admits that 
his works mark the very highest level of hu- 
man genius. But they represent no special 
epoch in the history of the individual mind, for 
the man of Shakespeare is always the man of 
actual life as he is acted upon by the worlds of 
sense and of spirit under certain definite con- 
ditions. But with the other four there is uni- 
versal and perennial application to our con- 
sciousness. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 
COLLEGE LOCALS. 



Query. " Can anyone tel 
habi table is?" 



me what in tbe world a 
H. C. C, '97. 

Mr. F. C. Sharon, '93, of St. Louis, \isited friends 
in Lake Forest Sunday. 

Prof. Eager now wheels around his diminutive ( ?) 
proportions on a bicycle. 

Mr. Sherman Bouton, of Champaign, '91, spent 
Sunday with Mr. F. A. Hayner. 

The Senior Club will meet on Thursday evening, 
Jan. iSth, in the AthenEeam Hall. 

Mr. Vincent, who last year graduated from the 
Academy, has entered the Freshman class. 

Prof. Stanley has an article on popular amusements 
in the "Open Letters" of the January Century. 

Mr. L Sutton, '91, spent Saturday and Sunday with 
old friends, reviewing old jokes and associations. 

Mr. Geo. C. Rice has left school and is now engaged 
in the real estate business with Warncke & Owen, Chi- 
cago. 

The athletic entertainment is a fixture for Friday 
evening, Feb. 19th- It promises to be the event of the 
term. 

Among those who failed to return after the holiday 
vacation are Miss Brown, A. B. Burdick and VV. T. 
Torrence. 

Messrs. Dearlove and Longcor have left the classic 
shades, the former going to Florida and the 'latter to 
Belvidere. 

The students of Prof. Smith's classes enjojed at- 
tending the reception given by Prof, and Mrs. Smith 
last Friday afternoon. 

Prof. Eager is now read}' to coach all Ferry Hall 
representatives who expect to compete in the Pu'lman 
road race next spring. 

Vaccination is all the rage just now and will explain 
the apparent paralysis of the left arms with which so 
many seem to be afflicted. 

Miss Taylor, outside Sem.'s door — Sem. busy writ- 
ing inside. A rap is heard — Sem., still writing, says, 
" O ! that's a tailor-made rap." 

The skating on the slough during last week was 
very fair; the disagreeable feature is the long time 
needed to go so far out in the country. 

Mr. Betten, who entered school here with '93, but 
was obliged on account of poor health to stop school, 
has returned and is taking work with '96. 

The matter for the catalogues is in the hands of the 
printer, and it is expected that they will be ready 
shortly after the beginning of the second semester. 



Quite a number of L. F. students attended the Yale 
Glee Club concert. A new element was very notice- 
able at the concert this year, namely, the presence of a 
large and noisy body of Chicago University students. 

There will be a meeting of the Base Ball team of 
'93, Wednesday, Jan. 1 7, at 1:15 p.m. in Prof. Daw- 
son's room, for the purpose of electing a captain for the 
season of '9 1. 

Harry Goodman, Mgr. B. B. C. 

Every fellow with a proper regard for his health 
should join the " hare-and hound" club which is being 
formed. An eastern writer says of "hare and hounds" 
that is one of the luxuries in athletics, while on the 
cinder track we have the drudgery. 

The University Glee Club met for two rehearsals 
last week under the leadership of Mr. Uline. A Lake 
Forest College Male Quartette has been formed, con- 
sisting of E. B. Uline, first tenor; VV. S. Bray, second 
tenor; A. P. Bourns, first bass; VV. F. Curry, second 
bass. 

Mr. Sopho. Moore was formerly the proud possessor 
of a cane, but last Saturday evening, at Ferry Hall, 
while putting the Doctor's intelligent canine through 
his tricks, the dog suddenly c imbed the stairs with the 
cane in his mouth. The dog came hack, but not the 
cane. 

On Friday, the last of a series of debates was ren- 
dered in Prof. Jack's Rhetoric Class. These dehates 
are an innovation in the English work, and for the 
most part have been decidedly inti resting. The range 
of subjects has touched upon most of the live topics of 
the day. 

The fellows who found home attractions so power- 
ful as make them several days late in their return to 
school, received dainty _/azw.s in the shape of neatly en- 
graved cards, inviting them at their earliest convenience 
to an audience with the "committee," to explain their 
absence. 

At the regular election, the last meeting of last 
term, the Athenian Society chose the following officers: 
A. O.Jackson, Pies.; C. O. Parish, V. Pies.; W. U. 
Halhert, Sec; VV. B. Smith, Tieas.r Harry Goodman, 
Critie; H. G. Timbeilake, Sgt.-at-Arms. A new con- 
stitution was also adopted. 

Prof. Halsey's class in Social Economics have be- 
gun and are planning work in a practical study of this 
subject. The students intend to do some " slumming," 
and also to study the different forms of charitable enter- 
prises. Another new departure are reviews of the best 
current magazine articles on the subject given by dif- 
ferent students appointed by the Professor. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The time for the annual Academy contest is ap- 
proaching and great interest is being aroused in college 
with regard to the outcome. It has always been cus- 
tomary to have the alumni of the winning society at 
the banquet, and it is barely possible that this may 
account for the great interest in the contest manifested 
by the College fellows^ 

The officers of the Zeta Epsilon Society for the en- 
suing term are: President, H. W. Harris; Vice Pies., 
E. A Drake; Secretary, T. W. F. Curry; Treasuier, D. 
I. Jones; Critic, II. Thorn, and Sergeant-at-arms, F. 
Moriette. The first meeting of the term was held on 
Friday evening, Jan. I 3th. The inaugural address of 
Pres. Harris was a credit to himself and society. 

On Tuesday, Tan. 2d, the L. F. U. Board of Trus- 
tees held a very well attended meeting. The interest 
of the meeting centered on a scheme for the develop- 
ment of that part of the University which is in Lake 
Forest, and particularly for the college proper. The 
scheme is being printed for distribution among the 
trustees and friends of the University. 

Several fellows have taken involuntary baths of 
late in Farwell Pond, and in the case of some of the 
younger boys it is surprising that there have been no 
serious results. On Thursday a little son of Mr. Piatt 
went through the ice in water over his head. Mr. 
Bird and Mr. Hunt happened to be near at the time 
and managed to get the little fellow safe to shore, but 
got thoroughly soaked themselves. 

Two excellent "chapel talks" were given last week. 
The first was on Tuesday morning, by Prof. Thomas, 
on the "Neo-Christian Movement in France." He spoke 
of the new moral drift in French fiction, and the fact 
that the younger men and the thinkers of the nation 
were turning to morality and religion. On Friday 
morning Prof. Bridgman told the students about the 
American School for Classic Studies at Athens. This 
school receives its financial support from twenty col- 
leges in this country, and is a source of inspiration and 
benefit to scholars who visit it. 

The faculty have at last finished the new schedule 
of requirements for admission, the principle of which 
schedule may be stated as follows: The requirements 
for admission shall be twelve units or credits, which 
shall mean that the applicant has taken at least three 
studies each year during a four year's course of prepa- 
ration. The units are to be divided among the studies 
in this manner: Two years of English above gram- 
mar, one year of history, two years of mathematics 
abo\ e arithmetic, four years of languages other than 
English, which languages can be in number not greater 
than two, one year of some laboratory science and two 
years of study in some one or not more than two of the 
above named subjects in addition, thus making the twelve 
required credits or units. 



The Sunday papers of Jan. 7 had long accounts of 
the actions of the students from one of the classes in 
our Dental Department. It seems the fellows, follow- 
ing the eastern custom, took possession of one of the 
theaters and made "Rome howl" until they were in- 
duced by the presence of a squad of police to desist. 

Friday evening, December 15th, the Aletheian So- 
ciety elected the following officers: Pres., Miss Eudora 
Smith; Vice-Pres., Miss McKee; Rec. Sec, Miss Mc- 
Clannahan; Cor. Sec, Miss Phelps; Treas., Miss Gil- 
son; Critic, Miss Skinner. The members of the pro- 
gram committee are Misses McKee, Keener and Mc- 
Lean. 

All the Aletheians spent the vacation "at home," 
except Miss McClanahan, who visited with her sister 
in the city. 

The Alethei-.n Society met as usual Friday evening, 
Jan. 5th. The principal business was the inauguration 
of officers, which was followed by an impromptu lit- 
erary program- After adjournment the members scat- 
tered to re-assemble by classes in various rooms where 
'feasts' were in order until the ' wee small hours.' 

We regret to announce that Miss Brown will not 
return to L. F. U. We shall miss her faithful work as 
a member of the Aletheian. 

The happiest event of the new year among the C. 
G's has been the delightful afternoon reception extended 
them by Miss Helen M. Searles, Thursday, Jan. 1 tth. 
We were invited 'to meet Mrs. Bridgman' and truly 
our most sincere thanks are due Miss Searles not only 
for her charming entertainment and manner as our 
hostess, but for the kind thought which prompted her 
to arrange for us the opportunity to meet such a delight- 
ful woman as Mrs. Bridgman proved herself to be. 
Every girl has expressed herself as intending to go anil 
see Mrs. Bridgman and the babies right awav and there 
is some danger of her being taken by storm. We very 
seldom meet the wives of the faculty, but judging from 
tiie few we have met, we are free to vote them at least 
as charming as the faculty, and we wish again to thank 
Miss Searles for adding Mrs. Bridgman to our list of 
acquaintances among the wives of the faculty. 



THINK OF IT 

4~POS-TIV-LY=12 

FOUR WEEKS '\ v our method teaching bookeeping is 
equal to TWELVE WEEKS by tlie old style. Positions guar- 
anteed under certain conditions. Our "tree" 56 and SO-page 
catalogues will explain "all." Send for them — Draughons Busi- 
ness College and School of Shorthand and Telegraphy, Nashville, 
Tenn. CHEAP BOARD Nl > vacation. Enter any time 
Address, J. F. Draughton, Pres't, Nashville, Tenn. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Z. E. FOURTEENTH ANNIVERSARY. 

The fourteenth birthday of the Zeta Epsilon Society 
occurred on Sunday, January 14th, and in commemora- 
tion of this fact anniversary exercises were held in its 
hall last Friday evening. There was a goodly gather- 
ing of alumni and friends, though the attendance of the 
latter was necessarily limited by the size of the hall. 
After the opening remarks of the President, Rev. Paul 
D. Bergen, 'So, first president of the society, spoke of 
"Early Zeta Epsilon." He told of the meagre begin- 
nings of the organization and aroused a spirit of love 
for those who had gone before. "The Place of the 
Literary Society in College Life," by W. H. Matthews, 
'92, was more particularly an address showing the place 
of Zeta Epsilon in L. F. College, which he said was 
decidedlv first. "The Alumni; their Relation to the 
Society," by G. W. Wright, '92, was a most excellent 
address, showing very clearly that the relation of the 
the alumni to the society was an exceedingly close and 
dear one. 

The College Male Quartette then rendered some 
good music, followed by II. Thorn with "Cullings 
from the Minutes," and a sketch by F. A. Hayner en- 
titled "Schoolmates." 

The regular program closed with more music by 
the Quartette. Impromptu speeches from all the alumni 
entertained the audience for nearly another hour. The 
key note of the evening was struck by A. G. Welch 
when he said that Zeta Epsilon stood for reliability 
and loyalty. 

After a short recess and the departure of friends, a 
short business meeting was held and then all ad- 
journed to the "Z. E. Eating House," where an oyster 
supper was served. Then the "boys" (old and young) 
made the room ring with good old college songs. The 
spirit of fraternity and fellowship aroused by the re- 
union will not be forgotten in many a day. 

The a'umni present were Rev. P. D. Bergen, 'So; 
A. G. Welch and B. M. Linnell, 'S 9 ; N. B. W. Gall- 
wey, cx-'9i ; H. H. Davis and J. Sutton, '91; W. H. 
Matthews, E. S. Chaffee, G. W. Wright and W. F. 
Love, '92; H. Marcotte, C. S. Davies and A. W. 
Doran, '93; H. E. House, ex '94; C.S. Kucker, ex-'96. 



COMMUNICATION. 

The Christmas Stentor made some suggestions 
for the celebration of Wafhington's birthday. One of 
"ye locals" would like to crystalize and add thereto in 
this way. Let there be a prominent speaker secured to 
address the students, faculty and town in the morning 
on some subject suitable to the occasion. 

Now, further, we have seven literary societies in 
the University here in Lake Forest besides the Univer- 
sity Club, which, of course, is too dignified a body to 
go by that name, but which, for convenience sake, we 
will say, makes number eight. We would suggest that 
each one of these societies appoint a delegate who shall 
be subject to the call of the delegate from the Univer- 
sity Club as chairman of a committee so formed for the 
purpose of getting up and executing a literary program 
on the evening of Washington's birthday. On such 
program one and only one from each society shall appear, 
which one shall be chosen by the committee. The time 
is short, about five weeks. Consequently, if anything 
is to be done, action should he taken at once that it may 
be well done. Wm. B. Hunt, '94. 



FERRY HALL. 

The new Ferry Hall yell: — Ouch!! My vaccina- 
tion!! 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris sjDent Saturday with their 
daughter, Satie. 

Miss Olive Cost was the guest of Mils Dillon Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

Miss Richardson's brother and cousin, Mr. Aborn, 
visited her Saturday. 

Mr. Hesse, brother of Mrs. Seeley, spent Saturday 
and Sunday with her. 

Miss Mabel Palmer and Miss Fanny Somerville arc 
now acting as reporters for The Stentok. 

We are sorry to note, so early in the term, that Miss 
Norton has experienced a very serious illness. 

We are pleased to welcome Miss Richardson among 
us, and trust that she will enjoy Ferry Hall life. 

Miss Maude Baker, who was a student in Ferry 
Hall two years ago, was the guest of Miss Goodwin 
Saturday. 

Florence Pride and Francis Marder celebrated their 
— th birthdays Thursday evening by an elaborate six 
o'clock tea. 

The first prayer-meeting of this year was made 
doubly interesting by the pleasing remarks of Dr Mc- 
Clurc and Mr. Holt. 

The engagement of Miss May Stowell to Mr. 
Cooper, of Chicago, has been announced. Her many 
friends extend congratulations. 

Miss Welton made a farewell visit to her parents 
last week before they left for the South, where they 
will spend the remainder of the winter. 

It has been suggested that we renew the German 
evening, which proved so beneficial and entertaining 
under the supervision of Miss Searles. 

The school desire to extend a vote of thanks, 
through The Stentor, to Anna Blair, for the deli- 
cious cocoanut pie which we had last Thursday. 

Miss Sizer has succeeded Miss Conger as teacher of 
Calisthenics. We trust the gymnasium work may be 
as successful in the future as it has been in the past. 

One day last week it was reported that there was 
very fine skating down on the slough. Did Doctor 
S. give the young ladies permission to go? "Well, 
yes, in the usual way." 

From among the many inmates of Ferry Hall, only- 
two received invitations to the 14th anniversary of the 
organization of the Zeta Epsilon society. "A word to 
the wise is sufficient," 

The following young ladies will not return this 
term— Missrs Watson, Utley, Palzow and Barnes. 
Their smiling faces and merry laughs are greatly 
missed in the respective corridors. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



News was received last Tuesday of the engage- 
ment of Miss Florence Phelps, graduate of '91, to Mr. 
William Woodward, of Independence, Iowa, at which 
place she is now teaching. The Stextor extends 
congratulations. 

At their first regular meeting this year, the mem 
bers of the Kappi Phi elected the following officers to 
serve for the ensuing term : President, Jean Stewart; 
vice-president, Mabel Palmer; secretary, Jessie De 
Lashmutt; critic, Zana Miller. 

The Logic class met Tuesday for their first lesson, 
and in answer to Dr Smith's question, "what is Logic," 
one of the young ladies replied, after much thinking, 
"Logic is the science of ethics," and then turned to the 
class as much as to say, "at what are you laughing?" 

The following symbol, H2M2BRL, expresses 
a new compound formed by some of the ener- 
getic students of the College. The first one who sends 
in a correct analysis of this symbol, together with one 
dollar, will receive The Stextor for the remainder of 
the year. 

Wisdom comes with age. Some of the Seniors are 
fast learning to take a "tumble themselves," especially, 
when in attempting to clear the ravine at the jump, in 
order that they may be on time to College recitations. 
For further particulars "just ask of the girl at the 
Sem.," Room 1 5. 

The girls feel greatly indebted to the College 
young men for two excellent serenades. In the last 
one quality exceeded quantity and we deeply regret that 
our stock of fruit and flowers was so diminished that we 
were unable to show our appreciation by a liberal dis- 
tribution of the same Let the good work continue. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

II. O. Morris has returned to school here. 

Remarks of admiration for the Christmas Stentor 
have hardly yet died away. 

The German table in the dormitory is no more. 
Abandonment is the cause of its death. 

Since Christmas the academic ranks have been 
swelled by the entrance of seven new students. 

Alas! Mr. Ilayner was not back on time, but 
equally alas! he was here a little later, and — "say, can 
you ber.d your elbows yet? " 

At a meeting of the Base-ball team held before the 
close of last year Mr. W. A. Reinhart was elected to 
the captaincy of the team for the spring season. 

Mr. Gates, as all know, has returned from his Eu- 
ropean trip, but does not intend to take up his study 
here, as was once before written in these columns. The 
genial gentleman will go to St. Louis. 



Although there is no snow upon the ground, yet 
singing loads of young ladies frequently pass the build- 
ings and are, no doubt, delighted to hear the sym- 
pathetic inmates "join in the refrain." 

It might be rightly suggested that others be invited 
to the General History class, which Prof. Burnap is 
making so intensely interesting. His attractive talks 
are instructive, and his questions are on vital points. 

The Tri Kappa society will hold its preliminary 
contest in declamation to-morrow. This is the first of 
the series of preliminary contests, which will be one of 
the regular features in the Academy until the contest in 
the spring. 

We were all delighted to hear that Bogue was to 
return on time. " Variety is the spice of life," we 
mused, but later, existence was drained of its spicy fla- 
vor — Bogue was sick. Oh, well-a-day ! The expected 
is sometimes so expected. 

Owing to a misunderstanding as to the date upon 
which the Christmas number of The Stextor would 
appear, the Academy news were lacking in that issue. 
Together with the editor we sincerely hope that acci- 
dents will happen no more. 

At its meeting last Wednesday, the Gamma Sigma 
society elected officers for this term. All but the trea- 
surer were re-elected. Those who hold office this term 
are: R. G. McKinnie, President; Clifford P. Mall, 
Vice-President; W. S. Kline, Secretary; L. II. Gilli- 
land, Treasurer. 

Prin. Smith at chapel recently remarked on the ad- 
vantages this term contained for study. " Where there's 
a will, there's a way," seems to be proved by many of 
those about us, and while many are undoubtedly able to 
gain the p >int aimed at quicker than we, we should ap- 
preciate that every effort toward a good result imparts 
a new degree of power. Slow development by its na- 
ture may have all the elements of irresistible sureness. 

Tri Kappa inaugurated her new officers elected for 
the ensuing term last Wednesday. The inauguration 
was, as all society proceedings will henceforth he, con- 
ducted according to the new constitution, just drafted 
and accepted last term. As has been stated here, a new 
office of Recording Secretary has been created with the 
birth of the constitution, together with which the list 
of officers is as fol'ows: Pies., Andrew Cooke; Vice 
Pres., Mr. Strops; Recording Sec, N. Hewitt; Busi- 
ness Sec, A. A. Cobb; Treasurer, Win, Jaeger. 



First student, rushing frantically down stair?: 
"Come on, something's the trouble down there." 

Second student, composedly : "No there isn't, that's 
the glee club practicing." — Ex. 



Vol. VII. 



January 23, 1894. 
> r—< 



No. n 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



1. IKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, coeducational. 



AT LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



AS FOLLOWS: 

4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO,- ILL. 






LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of wor and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY FIALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college wor, beside s exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE! has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (1) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French, 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology. (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 

THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Tudge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsojete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large bodv of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Jutl^e Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," 
" Local Government in Great Britain," " British Colonial System," " Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooler's work should be read by every laze student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to w-hich he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even bv way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9.50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



A. Q. SPALDING & BROS., 



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linest imported Serges and Flannels. Newest Styles and 
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CHICAGO: 



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108 fladison St. 24s Broadway. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

1032 Chestnut St. 



Skatiflg Is enjoyed by all. 

But to see the new College Stationery 

which we have just received is to buy it. 
Come around and look it over. 

Ruled or unruled, any way you want it. 
Envelopes to match. 

Pads containing 100 sheets-. 25 cents. 
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Dr. JOHN HENRY B1RR0WS GREAT HISTORY 

of the THE WORLD S 

PARLIAMENT 

0F RELIGIONS 

In I wo \ olumes— 700 Pages each. 1 he onlj official, reliable, full 
and authentic report of the most notable congress "I modern times. 

A. HABERLI, AGENT FOR LAKE FOREST 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1S94 



Xo. 1 



FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN. 

A CROSS COUNTRY JOURNEY. 

Fifty years ago, a journey of three thousand miles 
on land would have seemed an impossibility. But at 
the present time, our modern locomotives, with their 
immense driving wheels, carry us across this vast conti- 
nent in less than a week's time. 

The Canadian Pacific, although much the longer 
route, is generally acknowledged to be, by far, the most 
grand and picturesque in its scenery. 

A bright beautiful morning in June found me start- 
ing from Boston over this road on my way to Portland, 
Oregon. As most of the occupants of the car were bound 
for points on the Pacific Coast, I looked around to see 
who were to be my companions for the coming week. 
A bright appearing Scotchman first attracted my atten- 
tion. He was a smart looking fellow with an intelli- 
gent face and I judged him to be about twenty-five 
years of age. Already he had traveled fifteen days and 
was now on his way to join his brother in Tacoma. An 
elderly couple sat across the aisle and, as I afterwards 
learned, having lost all their possessions, yvere seeking 
their fortunes in the far West. A sea-captain's wife, 
who might well be described as being "fair, fat, and 
forty," had two young nieces in her charge, and need- 
less to say, this party proved to be the centre of attrac- 
tion for me. Then there was the usual quota of old 
maids and crying babies, the latter sometimes making 
night hideous with theiryells and screams. Fortunately 
they were in the further end of the car, and being a 
sound sleeper, I rarely was disturbed by them. 

In the meanwhile the engine was whirling us rapidy 
by New England towns and villages — now through 
broad meadow lands, then across a river where an oc- 
casional fisherman yvas seen to cast his fly over some 
deep pool. Twelve hours rolled by, and at nine o'clock 
that evening we reached Montreal junction. Awaiting 
the other section of our train yve were here delayed for 
hree hours. But at last we started, and not until thet 
Rockies had been crossed, and the Pacific almost reached, 
did I see aught but Canadian soil. Instead of culth ated 
fields and thriving villages, the country we viewed 
from the car windows the next day was of a far differ- 
ent character. Rough unbroken land dotted with tree 
stumps, and here and there a solitary pine, made the 
scene a barren and destitute one. Occasionally we 
stopped for water at small towns whose chief feature 
appeared to be one long street, bounded by low wooden 
structures facing the cars. The largest one was gen- 
erally a hotel, and in some instances this seemed to be 
the only building besides the station. Over others signs 



of "General Merchandise," "Post Office," but most. fre- 
quently "Saloon" or "Pool and Billiards," yvere ob- 
served. 

The Canadian Pacific Railroad carries main' immi- 
grants to the coast, and as this class of people could 
hardly afford the luxuries of the dining-car, they were 
compelled to patronize the lunch counters for their food, 
a stop of twenty minutes or so being made at each meal 
time. It was this feature of the trip that afforded us the 
most amusement. Before the train bad come to a stand- 
still, men carrying tin buckets, and women with babies in 
their arms would jump from the car steps and make a 
wild rush for the lunch rooms. Cries for coffee, milk, 
and ham — sandwiches filled the air, while over and above 
all this din and confusion could be heard the clanging 
bell, and the harsh nasel tones of the crier admonishing 
them to speedily partake of the tempting viands whose 
peculiar odors likewise admonished us to stay away. 

On, on we are carried and soon the rough wooded 
country changes to broad rolling prairie land. We can 
see the waving grass extending for miles in all direc- 
tions. Now the train slackens its speed with a jerk, and 
the engine screams forth its warning to a band of rov- 
ing cattle that have trespassed too near the iron high- 
way. Glistening white skulls, in piles ten feet high, 
and from five to twenty feet broad, and extend- 
ing sometimes a hundred feet or more along the 
track arouse our curiosity- as to their origin and 
purpose. Upon inquiry I learned that these piles are 
all that remain of those noble animals that once- 
existed plentifully on our yvestern plains — the American 
buffalo. These skulls have a commercial value for fer- 
tilizing purposes purposes and so are gathered and piled 
for transportation. 

One morning, as we yvere just turning over for our 
second nap, a cry rang through the car, "The moun- 
tains! — The Rockies at last!" In an instant every cur- 
tain yvas pushed aside and there, indeed, we saw what 
we had been straining our eves for at every twist and 
turn the road had made during the last twenty-four 
hours. And what a sight it was! Tipped by the first 
rays of the morning sun, the snow capped peaks of the 
Sierra Nevada range lifted their heads high above the 
banks of clouds that lined the distant horizon. We 
quickly dressed, and taking more advantageous posi- 
tions, yve watched the dark shadows retreat down the 
mountain sides and the mists sloyvlv dissolve under the 
advancing rays of sunlight. There yvas not one of us 
but that confidently expected to be among the moun- 
tains within a feyy hour's ride. But so deceived were 
yve as to their distance that two whole days of traveling 
passed before we even entered the foot hills. And 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



what shall I say as to the long tedious climb when once 
we had entered their boundaries, when, even aided by 
another powerful engine, we barely crawled up and 
around the mountain sides! But once over the crest, the 
engine stopped a moment for breath, allowing us to get 
out and have a snow-ball fight, even though it was the 
last of June, and then, thanking its helper, started down 
the further side. Should I live to be as old as Methu- 
selah, never could I forget that ride. Six hours behind 
time and connections that had to be made at Victoria 
with the steamer for California and Japan — stern facts 
that stared our engineer in the face and urged him to 
open the throttle almost beyond the safety limit ami 
plunge down the mountain side. Land slides had oc- 
curred but recently and more might follow, thus adding 
greatly to the danger. Now we dashed around a curve, 
the car rocking violently and the wheels grating harsh- 
ly against the outer rail, now into a tunnel enveloping 
us in inkv blackness only to emerge and rush across a 
wild mountain stream whose course we had been fol- 



ATHLETICS. 

The Academy students have determined to hold a 
field day of their own this spring for the purpose of 
selecting representatives for the big field day. There 
are several good athletes in the Academy and if the 
College expects to hold up their end they will have to 
"hustle." 

The gymnasium is not much used just at present. 
About the only piece of apparatus that can be used, 
besides the wall machines, is the parallel bars. The 
hand ball court was put up in such a way that the hori- 
zontal bar had to be taken down; there are no boxing 
gloves or punching bag, or at least none are at the 
gymnasium. There ought to be some vaulting poles 
and an indoor shot so that the men could begin prac- 
ticing for these games at once. 

The Hare-and Hound Club is at last a reality. At a 
meeting held last Monday it was determined to run 
every Saturday until the spring term when a series of 
three runs will be taken for prizes. Only those will be 



lowing for some time. At one time looking far down eligible to run for prizes who have made eighty per 

the mountain side we could see the track as it wound cent, of the runs and are regular undergraduate students, 

its way in and out, twice crossing our line of vision. At the meeting a committee was appointed to draw up 

Night soon closed in and with the gathering darkness rules and D. H. Jackson was elected captain. Captain 

our uneasiness increased. Bed time arrived, but none Hayner expects to make it one of the requirements for 

felt like retiring. The old lady in the seat near me, base-ball candidates, that they run with the Hare-and- 

naturally timid, was so frightened that she spent most Hound Club, 
of the night in tears. Soon we reached a lower level 

and the speed slackening considerably allowed us to rest Any one entering the basement of the gymnasium 

with our fears quieted. It was not until the next morn- will be likely to notice several large boxes stuck under 

ing we learned that in the one hundred and fifty miles the stairs and stowed away in corners, They are all 

ride down the mountains our engineer had made up padlocked. The reason for this is that when any one 

three of the six hours which we were behind time. The leaves his clothes hanging in a dressing-room he stands 

other three were made during the next day and about a good chance of having his pockets picked or some of 

five o'clock the evening of the seventh da}- we arrived his clothes stolen. Now there is a lot of waste space in 

at Victoria and made good connections with the Pacific the gymnasium and lockers could be put in just as well 

Coast Steamer, Columbia. My journey on rail was as not. This would do away with the present incon- 

ended. For three thousand and some odd miles, over venience of lugging clothes to the gymnasium every 

plains and mountains, I had been carried without acci- night and would be more sightly than the present sys- 

dent; therefore, it was with some reluctance that I tern of each man having a large dry goods box. 
gathered up my belongings and bid No. 344 good-bye. 



May it continue to carry in its seats many more passen- 
gers as safely before it meets its death in some railway 
disaster. H. B. Cragin, '97. 



Y. M. C. A. ENTERTAINMENT. 



At a meeting of the base-ball team last Wednesday 
Mr. Hayner was elected captain for this year. Mr. 
Hayner has shown by his work with the foot-ball team 
what may be expected of him. The material for pitch- 
ing is not very plentiful, but we may rest assured that, 
under the captain's able management, everything will 
be gotten out that is possible. There is some talk of 
Saturday evening, Feb. 3, the Y. M. C A. will give the team taking a trip of several days, and now that the 
a literary and musical entertainment in Ferry Hall league prospects are poor, this matter ought to be 
chapel. Prof. E. M. Booth will read and recite, and pushed. A trip would make more competition among 
the Glee, Banjo and Mandolin clubs will furnish music. the men and give them something to work for. Besides 
An interesting program is promised. After the exer- it would advertise the school and show that we at least 
cises a "sociable" will be held in the Seminary parlors. try to play base-ball. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Fourteen of the choir boys of St. James' Church 
Sang at the Art Institute last week. 

The Art Institute meets to-night at the house of Mr. 
Frank Hall. Mr. E. Burton Holmes will lecture. 

Miss Ada Rainey was one of those who received at 
a reception given for the Preparatory Department of 
Chicago University at Morgan Park, 111. 

One of the most successful meetings of the Social 
Club was held last week at the home of the Misses Piatt. 
Each young lady present wore in her hair some symbol 
or emblem of her "fad" cr "hobby." 

The series of meetings which have been lately held 
i : n the church chapel ended Saturday evening with a 
meeting for prayer only. It is hoped that the unusual 
interest taken in these meetings will be productive of 
continued activity throughout the year. 

Mr. Delavan Smith and Mr. VVm. Henry Smith 
formally opened their new residence last Wednesday 
night with a cotillion. About one hundred were pre- 
sent. The guests were quartered for the night in 
various Lake Forest homes. Mrs. Moss, Mrs. Dav, 
Mrs. Taber, Mrs. Frank Farwell and Mrs. Tuttle 
grave dinners to Chicago friends before the dance. 
Johnnie Hand's orchestra furnished the music, and 
Mathews catered excellently. 

A CHRISTIAN" ENDEAVOR SOCIETY. 

After many vain attempts, a Christian Endeavor 
Society has at last found a place in the church. This 
means a great deal to the present Church life. It is 
hoped that the attendance will increase and the influence 
will broaden because of this change. 

Friday evening, at a meeting of the Young People's 
Society of Christian Work, it was decided to reorgan- 
the society into a Christian Endeavor Societv. The 
first Y. P. S. C. E. prayer meeting will take place next 
Sunday, Jan. 27th. A committee was appointed to 
spread information regarding Christian Endeavor work, 
and was authorized to call a meeting this week for 
election of officers and appointing of committees. 

Those who used to be interested in the Society for 
Christian work will doubtless mark this movement as 
an improvement and an opportunity. A new spirit has 
already begun to appear, and evidently Christian En- 
deavor has come to remain. 



BIOLOGICAL CLUB. 

Last Thursday afternoon Miss Nona Phelps pre- 
sented a paper to the Club on "Sigmentation of the 
Primitive Vertebrate Brain," reviving a recent article 
by Chas. McClure on that subject m the Journal of 
Morphology. Prof. Harper completed the discussion 
of "Nitrification of Soils" begun at an earlier meeting. 
Mr. Jensen gave a short sketch of Dr. Asa Gray, 
America's great botanist. Likenesses of Dr. Gray at 
different periods of life were displayed. Prof. Harper 
showed that Cicuta bulbifua is in a state of reversion, 
from the sexual to the asexual method of reproduction. 
In nearly all cases the seeds fail to mature while the 
abundance of bulbits in the axiles represent an increas- 
ing preponderance of the sexual function. 



Only 43 out of 1 50 candidates for admission to West 
Point were successful at the last entrance examination. 



EXCHANGES. 

Our exchanges no longer teem with accounts of 
foot-ball. Preparations for Oratorical contests and 
Inter-collegiate Debates occupy many columns of the 
editorial page. We note in the Christmas numbers 
many well written sketches, descriptive articles and re- 
views. This part of the college year is the time for 
distinctly literary work, especially in the field of college 
journalism. If we are to judge by their holiday num- 
bers we may expect much for the year's work. 

We find on our table this term- the Tatler, a well- 
edited paper from West Des Moines High School. 

The "foot-ball poet" is beginning to subside for this 
year. He must now turn somewhere else for his 
theme. This last effort of his, from the De Pauw 
Weekly is one of his best. 

"JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE." 

"Courage, sweetheart, do not falter; 
Though the future may look drear. 
I will lead you to the altar 
On my crutehes, never fear." 

Low tht maiden whispered, crying, 

Softly on his foot-ball bang: 
"Break your fool neck, dearest, trying, 

Only beat the other gang." 

In the following the use of the word that is 
strictly in accordance with grammatical rules: 

"Now that is a word that may often be joined, 
For that that may be doubled is clear to the mind, 
And that that that is right is as plain to the view 
As that that that that we use is rightly used too. 
And that that that that that line has in it, is right 
In accordance with grammar is plain to our sight." 

— The Cue. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University S tentor - 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



any special part in the exercises of Commence- 
men. they absolutely need the extra time for 
preparation. 



* * 
* 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, j 
A. O. Jackson, '96, S 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 



Prof. J. J. Halsey, 


Alumni 


D. H. Jackson, '96, 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 


Exchanges 


Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 


Aletheian 


Miss F. Somerville, j 
Miss Mabel Palmer, \ 


- Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, I 
B. S. Cutler, (" 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 


Advertising 


TERMS. 




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Single Copies, 


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Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 



WE have previously neglected to make 
editorial mention of the "Chapel Talks" 
now being given by the different members 
of the College faculty. The plan was in- 
augurated by President Coulter last term, 
and has met with unanimous approval from 
the students. Each professor tells of the 
recent advances of thought or the latest 
observations of science in his department. It 
is often a matter of surprise to see how much 
information can be imparted in the brief time 
allotted. The talks also serve the purpose of 
destroying the somewhat perfunctory nature 
which formerly characterized our Chapel ex- 
ercises. 

* # 
* 

IT is a frequently heard complaint that the 



STEPS should be taken at once, as has al- 
ready been suggested, to secure the suit- 
able celebration of Washington's birthday. 
An address by a good speaker from abroad, 
with other exercises, would render the day not the equipment be in keeping with the 



gymnasium is lacking in apparatus. Inves- 
tigation proves this to be the case, but "the 
powers that be" seem to have overlooked the 
fact. It is our proud boast that we have the 
finest "gym" building in the west, but should 



both pleasant and profitable. 



# * 

* 



building? The deficiencies which areespecially 
missed at present are boxing gloves and a 
striking bag. These used to be the most pop- 
ular things in the gymnasium, and they could 
be replaced at a trifling cost. 



* * 
# 



SYSTEMATIC training for base-ball begins 
this week and every man who has ever 
played ball, or who thinks he can learn, should 



A FEW designs for University pins have 
been submitted to The Stentor. We 
hope to receive more designs within a few 
days, and next week will publish sketches of 
the best. Let some of our ingenious readers 
try to conceive something neat and pretty. 
Before the end of the term we hope to see the 
"long felt want" for a University badge satis- join the list of candidates. The position of 
fied. base-ball captain has often been a discourag- 

* # * ing one here in Lake Forest. Every student 

THERE is a rumor afloat that the "Senior owes it to himself and to the institution to co- 
vacation" just before theend of theSpring operate with the captain (and manager) in 
term is to be dropped this year. We trust every way possible. One method of helping 
that such will not be the case. The ma- that too many neglect, is to pay subscriptions 
jority of the class are naturally opposed to any to the Athletic Association promptly when due. 
change in the custom, but more than that, if You can at least do this, even if you cannot 
the Seniors are expected to arrange or take pitch a curve or steal bases. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



THE University of Chicago has lately suf- 
fered from the same sort of misrepresent- 
ation which Lake Forest College (especially 
the College girls) received at the hands of 
the newspapers two years ago, when a com- 
paratively harmless prank was magnified asan 
outburst of lawlessness. The papers recently 
gave startling accounts of the manner in which 
the Chicago dormitories and buildings had 
been defaced during the night hours. The last 
number of the U. of C. Weekly takes vigorous 
exception to the exaggerated reports. We 
heartily join in condemning the spirit of so 
many Chicago papers to sacrifice truth for 
sensationalism. The paper mentioned, how- 
ever, admits that some small offenses' have 
been committed at various times, and in that 
conviction voices a sentiment which is rapidly 
gaining ground, namely, that when College 
pranks go so far as to become vandalism they 
should be dealt with, not by the College au- 
thorities, but should be turned over to the 
criminal courts. College vandalism would then 
cease to be "at a premium," and the guilty 
parties would cease to be a species of heroes, 
for a justice court trial will quickly kill mock 
heroism. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 



I'XIVERSITY CALENDAR. 



Jan. 25, 
Fe\ 1, 

Feb. 2, 
Feb 3, 
Feb. 22, 
Mar. 21, 



Day of Prayer for Colleges 

Senior Club 

End of 1 st Semester 

Y. M. C. A. Entertainment 

Washington's Birthday 

- Spring Vacation 



THE TRIANGULAR LEAGUE. 

A committee of which A. P. Bourns is chairman, is 
now working up the scheme of the "Triangular Lea- 
gue." 

The following is from the Xorth~Mestern on the 
subject: 

"A league composed of Chicago, Lake Forest and 
Northwestern, could be maintained at very little expense, 
and all games would be well attended, because of the 
convenience with which they could be reached. This 
would insure the managers of the athletic associations 
against financial loss. Moreover, the large attendance 
at each game would increase interest in the league race, 
and college spirit would run high between the univer- 
sities, which are all practically Chicago institutions. 
Considerable interest is being taken at Northwestern in 
the formation of the proposed league, and it is to be 
hoped that the students of Lake Forest and Chicago 
Universities will look upon the plan with favor. 



11. R. Marsh, ex-'o^, is a star on the editorial staff 
of 'J'he I//i>ii, at Champaign, 111. 

Mr. Carver has been on the sick list for the past 
few days. (Too much vaccination). 

We shall be glad to have Miss Mabel Parker with 
us again when the new semester opens. 

This is the season when the gymnasium is appreci- 
ated, and every afternoon a scene of animation is pre- 
sented to the chance visitor. 

Programs of work for next semester are now out. 
The object in getting them out thus early is that stu- 
dents may arrange their studies and settle all conflicts. 

The College girls were tendered a very pleasant re- 
ception at the home of Mrs. W. R. Bridgman last Fri- 
day afternoon. A delightful time is reported by all 
present. 

Prof. B. — in Academy — "I wish you would all pro- 
vide yourselves with copies of the Anabasis. (Mr. G. ) 
Professor, do you prefer the Anabasis of Kelsey to 
that of Xenophon?" 

Mr. II. — in French— "The twain looked longingly 
in each other's eyes." — (At this juncture Mr. H. looks 
longingly out of the window), — "then embarrassed each 
other and silently wept." 

It is reported that a vigilance committee is being 
formed to look after the case of the Nimrod on the 
third Moor who nightly comes out to celebrate his es- 
cape from persecution for another day. 

At a recent meeting of the faculty it was voted that 
examinations hereafter are to be given at the option of 
the Professor. Hence, a common expression now is: 
"Does he (the Professor) give examinations?" 

The University Glee and Banjo Clubs will give a 
concert about the first of March in the Art Institute. 
The candidates for the Glee Club have been selected 
and it is hoped the semi-weekly wailing has ceased. 

We had the pleasure of listening to Dr. McClure at 
chapel exercises on Friday morning. Dr. McClure is 
always a most welcome visitor, and his timely remarks 
always leave a deep impression on every student's 
mind. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The Juniors at their hist meeting elected the follow- 
ing officers: E. E. Vance, president; Miss McKee, 
vice-president; Dean Lewis, secretary; Chas. Moore, 
treasurer; F. A. Hayner, poet; J. G. Coulter, sergeant- 
at-arms. 

Look in the athletic column for the account of pro- 
posed field day in the Academy. The Cads are taking 
the aggressive, and have some good men. Every fellow 
in the College must get out and work if we are to be 
successful. 

Rev. Mr. Shepard, an African missionary and a 
fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of London, 
will deliver an address before the students on Tuesday 
evening in Ferry Hall chapel on his African experi- 
ences. No admission fee, all invited. 

The annual "Day of Prayer for Schools and Col- 
leges" comes on Thursday, January 25th, and will be 
duly observed in Lake Forest. There will be an address 
to the students in the church chapel at half past ten 
o'clock, and other services not yet announced. 

The season for intercollegiate debates is now ap- 
proaching. Notice appeared in one of last week's pa- 
pers of an arrangement for two debates between North- 
western and University of Michigan; one debate to be 
held at Ann Arbor, in 1S94, the second at Evanston, in 
.895. 

The Aletheians held an 'impromptu spread' in the 
last hours of the night, Jan. 19th. Candy, nuts and 
crackers furnished the menu, and 'private opinions pub- 
licly expressed' furnished the chief amusement. The 
harder our week in College, the more we enjoy this re- 
laxation at its close. 

The Stextor has been asked to protest against 
the disagreeable habit to which many are subject, of 
reading over another's shoulder in the reading-room. 
A man's curiosity should not be so overwhelming that 
he cannot restrain it until some one else has looked 
through a periodical. 

An attempt is being made to get up a game of in- 
door ball between the town students and a team from 
the Seniors. '94 claims that it can beat any team which 
dare meet it; there are those, however, who think such 
a contest would be interesting, and it is probable a 
game will be played in the near future. 

The meeting of the University Club last Thursday 
evening was devoted to music. The club met at the 
Ferry flail parlors, and listened to classic selections on 
the piano, violin a.id Mute. After the program was con- 
cluded the club adjourned to Mrs. Seeley's parlors and 
the library for refreshments. The following took part 
in the musical exercises: Misses Ripley and Sizer, a 
piano duet; Mrs. Hester, songs; Prof. Thomas, the 
flute; Mrs. Thomas, accompanist; Mr. Villim, of Chi- 
cago, the violin; Prof. Eager, piano selections. 



The program of the Z. E. Society Friday evening 
was as follows: Vocal solo, entitled the "Odd Fellows' 
Ball," by VV. F. Curry. The subject of debate was, 
"Resolved, that the passage of the Wilson Tariff Bill 
would be a benefit to the country at large." Debaters 
on the affirmative, H. L. Bird and D. D. Lewis; on the 
negative, VV. E. Williams and C. A. Coolidge. The 
judges decided for the affirmative two to one. Then 
followed a declamation by J. J. Price; a ten-minute 
talk on the "Situation in Europe," by A. Haberli, and 
an impromptu on "Devil's Lake," by Geo. Rice. 

Dr. Coulter attended the last meeting of the "Cen- 
tral Relief Association" of Chicago, at which reports 
on "Work and Relief for the Unemployed" were read. 
He gave the most interesting part of the reports to the 
students in a chapel talk last Tuesday morning. He 
said that the tremendous problem of taking care of the 
unemployed is being worked out on a Christian and 
business basis. Mr. Stirling, President of the Joliet 
Steel Works, is giving all of his time to the work. All 
cases are thoroughly investigated and no deserving one 
is left uncared for. Frauds are ferreted out and strin- 
gent measures are taken to kill these greatest of all 
banes to charity. 

The Senior Club held its first regular meeting last 
Thursday evening. The program of the evening was 
short (but sweet) owing to several causes, and consisted 
of a piano solo by Miss Clark, a vocal solo by Miss 
Parmenter, and a harmonica solo, with guitar accompa- 
niment, by Mr. Bourns. A punch bowl with wafers 
"on the side" was the center of attraction throughout 
the evening. In a contest in word-making the boys- 
(selfishly) took both prizes; Mr. Goodman taking first, 
a silver pin, and Mr. Bourns the "booby" prize, an 
acrobatic doll. The committee in charge of the next 
meeting, which comes off on Feb. 1st, consists of Miss 
Clark, Miss Welton, and Mr. Harris. 

The Aletheian Society had a very pleasant meeting 
last Friday evening. The inauguration of the president, 
followed by the usual inaugural address, preceded the 
literary exercises. The first number of the program 
was a descriptive piano solo by Miss McLean, entitled 
"An afternoon on the Midway Plaisance," and once 
again the sights and scenes of 'Midway' were laugha- 
ble realities. This was followed by an original poem 
written and delivered by Miss McClanahan in her own 
humorous style. The symposium on Portia and Cath- 
erine the Shrew, by the Misses Oberne and Skinner,, 
was most interesting and instructive to Shakespeare 
students. The debate was omitted, because the ques- 
tion has ceased lo he of interest since the program was 
prepared. The business meeting was enlivened by the 
discussion of various new plans for increasing the effi- 
ciency of the society during the term. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



On Thursday morning Prof. Harper gave us an in- 
teresting geological talk in chapel, explaining the 

"long'' and "short" archaeologists of America. He said 
that a few years ago Dr. E. C. Abbot found imple- 
ments in the gravel beds of New Jersey which he thought 
were formed during the Glacial epoch and belonged 
to the man of the paleolithic age. This would make 
man cotemporary with the Glacial epoch. More re- 
cently, however, Prof. Holmes has found that these so- 
called paleolithic stones are not unlike the stones be- 
longing to the neolithic man, which he has found in the 
Indian quarries where the Indians first roughly shaped 
their implements, afterwards finishing them at their 
leisure and giving them the neolithic appearance in 
their villages. Thus it seems that as yet we have found 
no good evidences of the appearance of man on the 
Western continent previous to the Mound Builders. 



Miss Nei 



FERRY HALL. 

'as visited by her sister last Sunday. 



W. R. Jones, of Chicago, spent Sunday with his 
sister-in-law Miss Welton. 

A special feature of the Chapel exercises Monday 
a. m. was a solo, beautifully rendered, by Mrs. Hester. 

Owing to a protracted illness, Miss Norton is unable 
to continue her instruction in French. The position 
will be filled by Miss Susaune Hall, of Chicago. 

Miss Nellie Flershiem, a student of the Evanston 
University, was a guest in Ferry Hall, Friday and Sat- 
urday. 

The old proverb, "The longest way round is the 
shortest way there," does not hold true in all cases, 
especially when in haste to reach the Art Institute, and 
the girls greatly rejoice to see the Sem. bridge so near 
its completion. You may come home "the other way" 
if vou want to, girls. 

The University Club were charmingly entertained 
by Mr. and Mrs. Seeley, Thursday evening. The 
parlors and library were tastefully decorated for the 
occasion. Dainty refreshments were served, and each 
guest carried away a uniquely designed program as a 
souvenir of the evening. 

The Athenaean hall was thrown open to the Seniors 
Thursday evening for the entertainment of their club. 
The first part of the evening was taken up by a literary 
program, followed by singing anil old-time games. 
In the word contest Mr. Goodman succeeded in gaining 
first prize, while Mr. Bourns through repeated efforts, 
hore away the booby prize. 

At a recent meeting of the Faculty, it was decided 
to have, instead of the essays at Commencement, an 
address by some distinguished personage. Although 
this is different from the usual exercises, we believe that 
it will be fully as profitable. No worrying over essays!! 



Lost, strayed or stolen, (the latter we think,) five 
bricks of ice-cream. Later, an empty cream can was 
seen in one of the young lady's rooms. There is such 
a thing as carrying a joke too far, and we think such is 
the case, when it comes to carrying it from the College 
to the Seminary. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Kennedy has lost a collar button. 

Mr. Hanson is ill with the grip in Chicago. 

Professor Burnap was in Chicago last week for two 
days. 

First Student — (significantly) — "Has it taken jet?" 
Second Student — Yes, it has taken nine days to get 
the use of my arm." 

Seven young gentlemen, with Prof. Dudley, treated 
us to a song and a consequent encore Saturday. They 
were loudly applauded. 

Mr. Fred. Smith, alias "Gimpv," is confined to his 
bed by illness, but we are glad to state that the possi- 
bility of its being serious is passed. 

On Wednesday forenoon the Tri Kappa Society 
held its declamation preliminary contest, and Gamma 
Sigma holds its preliminary contest in debate. 

Because of Mr. Andrew Cooke's illness, Tri Kappa 
postponed her preliminary contest in declamation. In- 
stead, a short and exceedingly enthusiastic session was 
held before the adjournment to Gamma Sigma's preli- 
minary. 

Our chapel exercises Thursday were made doubly 
interesting by the presence of Dr. McClure, who spoke 
to the boys in a way that bespoke his great interest in 
them. It is but seldom we have a chance to enjoy re- 
marks from him, and we appreciate the opportunity. 

Friday morning, immediately after chape', those 
present resolved themselves into an athletic meeting 
with Prof. Williams as chairman, to elect a manager 
for the base- ball team. After remarks by the chairman 
on the depleted condition of the treasury, nominations 
were made. The election resulted in a vote of ^2 for 
Mr. Jaeger, the next higher candidate receiving 19 
votes. 

"Business Life of the Romans" was the subject of 
a paper read by Prof. Palmer to the Latin students and 
as many more as wished to listen last Thursday. A 
profitable hour was spent by those who flocked to hear 
him, for, as the Academy students know, the Professor's 
papers are always exceedingly interesting and, it is 
superfluous to add, instructive. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Last Wednesday at I I a. m. Gamma Sigma held 
her preliminary contest in declamation. The members 
of Tri Kappa were invited into the chapel where the 
contest was held, and also a number of Gamma Sigma 
alumni, who were ioudly cheered as they entered. 
The judges accorded first place to Mr. Newton and 
second place to Mr. Leland H. Gilleland. All the de- 
claimers spoke remarkably well, especially Mr. Cross, 
but as there are only two choices, some one must be 
disappointed. The contestants were as follows: R. 
Cross, W. Rumsey, M. Scudder, W. A. Newton and L. 
H. Gilleland. 



THINK OF IT 

4-POS-TIV-LY=12 

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equal to TWELVE WEEKS by the old style. Positions guar- 
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Tenn. CHEAP BOARD No vacation. Enter any time 
Address, J. F. Draughton, Pres't, Nashville, Tenn. 



A PARADOX. 

This question has vexed me, for many long years, 
And vainly I've sought an explanation, 
A youth though he slumbers till ten every morn, 
Is one of the rising generation. — Adalbert. 

All life is plunged in deepest gloom; 

To dance and sing is wicked here, 
For songs shall vanish in the tomb, 

And "hops" all vanish in the bier. 

— Columbia Spectator. 



Chicago's Leatthirj Religions Weekly. 

II Good 

° The <t 

meriorJ Sunday 

j Reading 

For Satfr at Aewsta)ids. 



TO A FARMER. 

Oh! thrifty farmer do not fail 
To send your son to college; 
For there he'll learn to sow wild oats, 
Together with the knowledge. 

That horse and ponv are the same; 

That Bohns are stimulations 
Which aid the cribs (not used for corn) 

To pass examinations. 

— The Adalbert. 




^Tbe Craio press, 

printers, publishers, designers 
178=182 /JDonroe Street 
(Tbicago. 



The following does not describe one of the trials of 
editing The Stentor: 

The editor has asked for poetry, he gets, divinely 
inspired monologue, decalogue, epilogue, prologue and 
what not. Seas of Summer's shimmering silver silence 
softly sitting on the sward almost capsize his fragile 
comprehension and he publishes as much of it as he can 
find space for while echoing Mr. Morrison's suggestion 
to future contributors: 

When you write a merry jest, 

Cut it short; 
'Twill be too long at its best, 

Cut it short; 
Life is brief and full of care, 
Editors don't like to swear, 
Treat your poem like your hair, 

Cut it short. — Ex. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
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tions strictly confidential. A I I ;: M il I,.:.-,.' ' of In- 
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Patents taken through Munn £• Co. receive 
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thus are brought widelv before the public wi: - 
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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. 0. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc.- 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 

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The Model Clothing House, 



Temperance Temple, Washington St., 
I he [Vjodel " makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN. 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats icP Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. « Verbum Sat Saj>ienti. n 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




OF 



H1CAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. • First District of Illinois. 

HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE /^ VI T rf~ A /~ O 

S.E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. V^nlUAUVj. 



* 



Vol. VII. 



No. 14 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co-educational. 



AS FOLLOWS: 

4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 



AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



AT CHICAGO, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of wor and fits for entrance into all th e 
leading colleges. 

FERRY FIALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work ami two years 
of college wor, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (1) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French, 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (it) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 
For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address 

JOFIN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, Ti.i.. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 

THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the obsolete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Stud}- of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
"Local Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooley' s work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

"Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principled of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9.50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



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PHILADELPHIA: 
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Skatitlg Is enjoyed by all. 

But to see the new College Stationery 

which we have just received is to buy it. 
Come around and look it over. 

Ruled or unruled, any way you want it. 
Envelopes to match. 

Pads containing 100 sheets, 2; cents. 
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TOMASO 

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CHICAGO. 

Or. JOHN HENRY BARROWS GREAT HISTORY 

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PARLIAMENT 

of RELIGIONS 

In Two Volumes -700 Pages each, rhe only official, reliable, full 
and authentic report of the most notable congress of modern times. 

A. HABFRLI. AGENT FOR LAKE FOREST 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1894 



No. 14 



ALMA HATER. 

(Reprinted from The Red and Bluett.) 
TUNE, DRINKING SONG. 

Lake Forest dear, our Alma Mater, 
Thy praise we sing with heart and voice, 
Thy red and black floats proudlv o'er ns 
And in thy glory we rejoice; 
As stand the brave old trees about thee 
Strong as thy lake's fierce waves in storm, 
So stand thy children to defend thee 
While love in every heart beats warm. 

Beneath thy forest shade reclining. 
We gather knowledge at thy feet, 
The happy days passed all too quickly 
With friendship bright and pleasure sweet. 
Yet, when in after years, life's striving 
Shall change our joy to care and pain, 
The love and friends of Alma Mater 
Our richest treasures shall remain. 

Lake Forest, when farewell we bid thee 
And from thy college halls depart, 
As when by lands or sea divided 
The love of country fills the heart, 
When courage fails or hopes are dying, 
Our thoughts shall ever turn to thee, 
Our watchword be till time is ended — 
For God, Lake Forest, victory ! 

A. W. Dorax, '93. 



EVENING AT THE NORTHWESTERN DEPOT. 



The wonders of Chicago have been well and fre- 
quently described. Chicagoans are generally the first 
to praise some new achievement or exploit some gigan- 
tic enterprise. But, however, there are many things in 
Chicago that, although remarkable, are never perceived 
by even such energetic boasters. They are wonderful 
from the very fact that they are unnoticed and unreal- 
ized. It is true that, unconsciously, we see and are a 
part of a life which, to strangers, is one of the most in- 
teresting and amazing characteristics of Chicago. It is 
always hard, however, to take ourselves up from our sur- 
roundings and look down with critical eye upon them and 
their relative position to the rest of the world. Even if 
we had time, we probably should not think of taking 
pains to observe those sights and places with which we 
have been familiar for years. Until we have thus ob- 



served, we cannot understand how Chicago is different 
from any other crowded, busy, monotonously active 
city. 

One evening, during the holidays, an unwelcome 
opportunity was offered me of observing what 
went on in the Northwestern Railway station, 
commonly known as the Wells Street Depot. 
I had missed a train and was forced to wait for 
nearly an hour. At that moment I was watching the 
ceaseless coming and going in the car-sheds. It was a 
day or two before Christmas, moreover the busiest 
time of the day, which perhaps accounted for the 
crowd. However, for some reason, there was what 
seemed to me an unusual rush; the confusion was 
heightened, also, by the feverish haste of each particle 
of the mass. Each was bent on catching his train, and, 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



moreover, was evidently under the impression that his 
train was just starting. Consequently, each wore an 
amusing look of anxietv and fearfulness. 

I wondered if I had looked thus just a few minutes 
before, when I too was dashing down the stairs to the 
train that had already left. Alas! I must have appeared 
even more foolish, for these people all reached their 
trains in time. Swallowing my vexation, however, I 
began to ascertain my bearings. 

The prospect before me would ordinarily have been 
quite unpleasant, for I had never noticed anything of 
interest about the station. I had been in and out of it 
times without number; I had taken time-cards from 
the sheet-iron pocket on the wall; had gotten bundles 
of Marshall Field's boy at the foot of the stairs inside; 
had checked trunks, and had bought flowers of the old 
woman; I had even gone so far late one night as to eat 
a sandwich at the lunch counter; but always until to- 
day I had been of the crowd, one of the scramblers, 
and never had it seemed anything more than a prosaic, 
everyday, commonplace railway station. 

This evening, on the contrary, the stingy old station 
was interesting. What a busy place it was! How many 
people there were, and how they hurried ! How quickly 
the trains filled! How man)' papers the newsboy sold! 
It was truly wonderful. It was strange. It seemed 
like some other station. As it happened, for the minute 
I did not see one familiar landmark. Under the black 
wooden clocks with "This train leaves at" printed on 
them in white letters, were long lists of stations which 
might as well have been in Africa for all I knew of 
them. And yet the trains for those unheard-of places 
were as crowded as any on which I was accustomed to 
ride. 

Meanwhile the people kept coming. The city above 
poured down a rushing stream of humanity. Old men 
and youths, women and boys, laboring men, clerks, 
shop-girls, all were borne in on the flood, and 
were tumbling over one another in frantic haste. If 
perchance, the puffs of a starting engine sounded, the 
pace would quicken, as each wondered if the ominous 
sounds belonged to his own train. 

Sometimes they came steadily, sometimes in spurts. 
The city, like a great heart, throbbed, now regularly, 
now hurriedly; now pumping a steady flow, now eject- 
ing at intervals. The station was a pulse, by which one 
could tell how actively the city was working, whether 
normally, or feverishly. 

But as I watched, there is a sudden lull. Like the 
mountain torrent that quickly comes, and as quickly 
goes, the mad stream from the street disappears; the 
platforms are left emptv. There is no more confusion. 
The train agents take a breath; the newsboy with the 
blue suit rearranges his papers and counts his gains, 
while the gatemen have an opportunity of exchanging 
a few words. One single suburbanite comes down the 



stairs, and he looks forlorn and lone indeed. Where 
are the people? Why this sudden silence? 

A hoarse toot on the river and the tops of three 
tall masts gliding by, answer that the bridge is open. I 
imagine the thick impatient mass lined up along the 
brink of the river, and waiting to rush across as soon as 
the bridge swings. 

The conductors take out their watches to see how 
many seconds they can wait for the belated. Just then 
a dignified vestibule train takes the opportunitv of 
slowly, silently, sliding away from in front of me. 
"That train," I thought, "goes farther, sees more and 
knows more of the world than any of these suburban 
trains. It is an aristocrat, while they are of the com- 
mon-herd." I could see it winding away over the maze 
of tracks, among the myriads of green switch-lights, 
and across the bridge, until finally the red lanterns of 
the last car were lost in the haze beyond. 

Just at this minute a half a dozen little boys with 
lunch boxes tear down the stairs, the first indications of 
the coming flood. They were probably on the bridge 
as it turned, and thus gained a bridge-length's start of 
the others. They race to their train, and the first one 
there proudly mounts the brake-wheel; the others have 
to rest content with hanging their legs off the plat- 
form. 

But the torrent is coming. There is an uproar above. 
The newsboy prepares for a rush ; the gatemen open 
the gates wide. One second more and they are here. 
They cover the platform, and fill everv corner. Hast- 
ening, hurrying, hustling, almost head over heels, they 
crowd out into the aisles, and swarm into the cars. As 
a train moves out, the rear end is black with men. It 
is like a great magnet dipped in filings, and the filings 
in their eagerness to reach it, cling to each other in a 
heap. When the train is well started, a few late filings 
are seen running along the platform, a-nl adding their 
part to the heap. 

Thus the rush kept on. I began to feel a new 
thought working within me. Chicago haste truly is a 
Chicago peculiarity ; it is one of her proudest boasts. 
But this incontinent tumult surely was nothing to boast 
about. It was already beginning to appear ridiculous, 
and would have seemed absurd to a stranger. If it 
were possible to stop one of the racers and make him 
observe for himself, he would soon decide that it was 
all foolish and unnecessary. Such universal haste may 
be remarkable, it may be unusual; but very surelv it is 
not admirable. 

Time-saving, so ran my thought, is carried to too 
great an extreme. It is felt almost a duty to put off 
starting for the train until the ver\ last minute, and 
then hurry away. And this is the reason that all these 
people, without exception, came into the station with 
that driven, fearful look, all in suspense lest their train 
should have departed. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Moreover, many run who should not run. That short 
man of large circumference ought never to worry him- 
self into a trot, and yet there he starts up. Here comes 
an old man with arms full of Christmas bundles; he 
too has the driven look, and in his haste he stumbles 
and drops his packages. And many women have from 
time to time made a frantic exhibition of unlady-like 
haste. 

It is all wrong, I thought. It is useless, unwise, 
wearing on body and mind, and more often on soul. I 
had learned a lesson. What does it profit one, who, 
though he saves two minutes in the office, probably 
takes two days from the length of his life? Who pays 
dearly for timed saved, in nervous strength lost? 

No! Never again would I he so thoughtless. I re- 
solved seriously and solemnly that never again would I 
foolishly defy time and try to gain a minute. Better 
to calm one's self and wait for the next train than waste 
away in nervous suspense. If I had bundles, I thought, 
I would start the earlier. If I wanted to accomplish 
enough to make the journey to the citv worth while, I 
would start early and return late, rather than crowd 
many errands into few minutes; but never would I 
hurry for a train. My resolve was fixed. 

Just then, as I pondered, I noticed a familiar figure 
scurrying along, and he at the same moment caught 
sight of me. "You will have to hurry if you catch 
this train," I heard, then suddenly the figure darted 
through the gate after a train just rolling out. Like a 
madman I tore after him. I ran, it seemed to me, as I 
had never run before. And just as, panting and puffing, 
I seized the iron railing, and leaped upon the steps, I 
heard a brakeman remark : "Well, I've been running 
on this road nearly eleven years, but that's the fastest 
time I've seen in the old station vet." 

David Fai.es, Jr., '96. 






No. 1. No. 2. 



No. 3. 



THE UNIVERSITY PIN. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rumsey and family will shortly 
leave for Florida. They will remain there several 
months. 

Last Tuesday was the coldest clay this winter. In 
the morning the thermometer was variously reported as 
recording from 1.1" to 28". ■ - 

The second of the series of musicales under the 
direction of Mr. Marum was held at the home of Mrs. 
Frank Farwell last Thursday evening. 

There has been continued interest in the prayer 
meetings at the church. Meetings were held there last 
week every night except Tuesday and Thursday, when 
instead there were various meetings in other parts of the 
town. 

Monday Miss Holt and Miss Lucy Rumsey left for 
Oconto, Wis., where they will make a tour of the 
mining camps in company with Mr. Arthur Holt. Miss 
Rumsey will afterward go to St. Paul for a month's 
visit. 

The Art Institute was held last week at the home of 
Mrs. Frank Hall. The evening was one of especial 
interest. Mr. E. Burton Holmes gave an illustrated 
lecture on the Oberammergau Passion Play, following 
with some views of Japan. 

Considerable interest was shown in the organization 
of the Christian Endeavor Society last Wednesday 
evening. A temporary President and Secretary were 
elected to serve until the election of the regular officers 
next Wednesday evening, Tan. 31st. A large attend- 
ance is needed then. 

An entertainment will be given Saturday evening 
for the benefit of the College Y. M. C. A. Prof. Booth 
will read several selections. An octette selected from 
the Glee Club will sing and there will probably be 
other music. The program will be followed bv a so- 
ciable in Ferry Hall parlors. Tickets are 35 cents each. 
The people of Lake Forest are earnestly requested to 
aid this excellent cause. 



The above illustrations are of the three best designs 
for a LTniversity pin, which have been submitted in 
reply to The Stentor suggestion. The pins will be 
finished in red and black, and will cost from thirty-five 
cents to a dollara according to material and finish. The 
designs which proves most popular will be adopted as 
the University pin, and in order to find which design is 
preferred by the majority it is proposed that all our 
readers vote on the matter. Write your preference on 
a postal card and mail to The Stentor, or give some 
member of the editorial board, as soon as possible. 
At this writing No. 3 has the preference. 



Africa possesses the smallest university going, as 
well as the largest. An exchange mentions one con- 
sisting of five students and twelve instructors. 

Egypt carries off the palm for a popular university. 
That located at Cairo, founded in the year 973 of our 
era, has an enrollment of 10,000. 

A Latin play will be given bv the undergraduates 
of Harvard this year- The "Phormio" of Ter- 
ence has been selected because in plot and in develop- 
ment it approaches more nearly than others to the mo- 
dern comedy. Prof. F. D. Allen has prepared the 
music and Prof. Greenough has written a new prologue 
for the play. — University Review. 



19SUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, - 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, | 
A. O. Jackson, '96, i 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 
Miss Eudora Smith, '94 
Miss F. Somerville, 
Miss Mabel Palmer, 
S. E. Gruenstein, ) 
li. S. Cutler, I 
A. P. Bourns. '94, 
C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 

Alumni 
Athletics 



Business Manager 
Advertising 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. finding. As a man acquires education, his 

perception of the foibles of his fellows becomes 
(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

keener, and unless he guards against it, the 
education process, which is intended in itself 
to be a broadening process, becomes narrow- 
ing in its effects. The custom of supercilious 
criticism, especially if one is by nature inclined 
in that direction, is very readily formed, and 
once permitted it soon becomes chronic. We 
Exchanges ] cnow f College men to-day who, through dis- 

Aletheian 

position and practice, have become wholly un- 

Ferry Hall r r J 

able to recognize merit in man or woman. The 
Academy majority of mankind, to them, is either igno- 
rantly foolish, or detestably selfish. They 
claim to see at a glance that ever)' man is 
animated by stupidity or self-seeking motives. 
It is such cynics as these who bring oppro- 
brium on the name of college graduate, for of 
all uncomfortable men the confirmed cynic is 
probably the most disagreeable. The modern 
college student who is a victim of cynicism is 
happily rare, but we presume that a few such 
A UNIVERSITY SONG. superior unfortunates are found in every 

WE print this week the Lake Forest song school. The cause of their dissatisfaction is 
written by A. W. Doran, '93, which was usu ally not far to seek. Admiring nothing ex- 
published in the Red and Black last year. The ternal to themselves, they still have a supreme 
words are good and the tune is simple, both admiration for their own abilities, but lacking 

. 1 r j ■ i 1 u- executive ability and "push," they are disap- 

together forming an admirable combination, . . ..,.*: ' y . . 

, , r , , , „ TT , , pointed in their desire for office and position, 

and by far the best L. b. U.songyet produced, -n n 1 1 1 ..1 t ^ «. *i 

3 & J r I hey sullenly conclude, therefore, that those 

The theme is a fruitful one, however, and we who are awar ded the coveted places have se- 
hope others will be tempted to try it. The cured them by unfair means, and with an ulte- 
Stentor would be glad to receive and publish rior end in view; and so they fall back to carp- 
verses, either grave or gay, suitable for a ing criticism as a relief to their jealousy. 



TERMS. 

Per Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$1.50 

.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Otnee at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 



University song. Such songs should not ex- 
ceed thirty lines in length, and should be 
adapted to familiar airs, or if the music is 
original it should not be too difficult. 



Ever) 7 true student sees the falseness of 
such a position. The aim of a College course 
is to broaden the mental and moral horizon, to 
increase the sympathies and to help one to 
take a philosophical view of life. A liberally 



Owing to the present "financial stringency" educated man should be above petty jealousies 



we are unable to offer any prizes for this work, 
but in a good cause perhaps our verse makers 
will be willing to exercise their wits for "glory," 
as do College editors. 



* 
* * 



COLLEGE CYNICS. 

IT is very easy for any one, and especially 
College men, to get into the habit of fault- 



— in fact he should have no room in his life for 
such emotions. If he does with his might the 
work next at hand, if he is ever ready to be 
helpful, these opportunities for increased use- 
fulness will come as fast as he is able to take 
advantage of them. If all would adopt the 
cheerful motto of Edward Everett Hale — 
''Lend a hand" — cynicism would very soon dis- 
appear. 



THE UNIVERSITY ST ^NTOR. 
COLLEGE LOCALS. 



Among the old friends whom we were glad to see 
with us again was Mr. Grant, who spent a couple of 
days of the past week in Lake Forest. He is 
doing sonic training under Stagg for baseball. He 
says Chicago's prospects for a good team are very 
bright. 

Hand-ball is all the rage now. Already there 
are several teams very closely matched and who play a 
very sharp game. It is probable that if a gymnasium 
exhibition is given, (and a movement is on foot for 
such an exhibition), that a chance will be given at that 
time to settle the question of the supremacy of the var- 
ious hand-ball teams. 

The change in the weather bringing sleighing has 
been taken advantage of by several jolly crowds latelv. 
On last Thursday evening a party of six couples en- 
joyed the cool, moon-lit air, stopping at Mrs. Williams 
to be warmed and fed. On Saturday evening the 
[uniors with some auxiliary friends made a joyful noise 
through Lake Forest's quiet streets, going to the "Z. 
E. Hotel" for refreshments. 

It would seem that when a man breaks a window 
in the gymnasium through carelessness that he would 
be honest enough to pay the damage, and if he does 
not admit his guilt, as a matter of self-protection to 
others, he should be reported. There are indulgences 
granted bv the gymnasium committee in regard to the 
use of the upper floor for certain purposes, and the con- 
Student Volunteer Movement, will probably be in Lake tinuance of these indulgences depends largely on the 
Forest to address the Christian organizations of the conduct of those using the gymnasium. 

students on Tuesday, Feb. 6th. 

On Tuesday evening, Jan. 23rd, Mr. Sheppard, a 

The very common question just now is, "How colored Presbyterian missionary from the Upper Congo 

many hours have you for next semester?" The course region, who has spent eleven years in Africa, gave to 

in English has been enlarged and advanced, there the students of Lake Forest in Ferry Hall Chapel a 

being now five semesters of English literature offered. lecture both entertaining and instructive. He was well 



R. H. Crozier, '93, is now in the railroad business 
in St. Louis. 

G. VV. Wright, '92, spent a part of last Thursday in 
Lake Forest. 

Remember the Y. M. C. -V. entertainment on Sat- 
urday evening. 

Miss Cooke, of Waukegan, a member of '97, has 
left school. 

E. U. Graff, ex '95, will return to college thebegin- 
ing of the second semester. 

Mr. II. E. House, ex '94, accompanied Mr. Shep- 
pard last Tuesday evening. 

Prof. Thomas' class in " Theism " will enjoy his 
hospitality at his home this evening. 

The Seniors took great pleasure in accepting Mrs. 
Scellv's kind imitation for tea on Monday afternoon. 

Prof. Halsey has been confined to his house for the 
past week, and so was unable to meet any of his classes. 

The Hare-and- Hound run scheduled for la^t Satur- 
day did not tuke place owing to the heavy snow fall. 
If the weather permits there will be a run the coming 
Saturday. 

Mr. D. \V. Lyon, the traveling secretary for the 



A good deal of interest was manifested in the out- 
come of the argument between Messrs. Corbett and 
Mitchell last week. We have so far been unable to 
ascertain just how much money changed hands on the 
result. 

The latest additions to the library are the complete 
works of J. G. Holland in sixteen volumes, of Thorean 
in ten volumes, and of Bret Harte in six volumes. A 



called a " Second Kennau " so realistic and natural were 
some of his descriptions, and he certainly holds a high 
place as a missionary lecturer. He takes with him, as 
he now returns to Africa, the best wishes of Lake 
Forest students. 

The Aletheian meeting on last Friday evening was 
made especially interesting by the presence of several 
visitors. The program was as follows: Duet, violin 
and piano, by the Misses Pearce; paper, "World's 

library catalogue will probably be out the latter part of rj niver sal Journal," ( exceptionally attractive ) by Misses ' 

this week. Keener and Cotton. The debate was given '-because 

A project is on fool to bring about a joint meeting the question has not ceased to be of interest." The de- 

of the three literary societies of the college. That such baters were Misses Eudora Smith and Abigail Davies. 

a meeting would be a success we have no doubt, and it A recitation (original) by Miss Olive McClanahan; 

is to be hoped that the matter may be favorably con- music by Miss Leila Hodge and a dialogue by Misses 

sidered bv all the societies. Darby and Wetherhold. 

Dr. Johnson, who addressed the students last Thurs- Mr. W. II. Richardson, the State Secretary of the 

day morning has been in Chicago only a short time, but Inter-Collegiate Association will address the students of 

is rapidly making a name for himself. In his address College and Academy in the College Chapel Wednes- 

here he produced a very favorable impression, both in day evening at 6:45. He is the State Organizer and 

the morning and afternoon. desires to organize a Prohibition Club in this institution. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The ultimate aim of this Club is to promote political 
interest in dealing with the liquor problem, its present 
aim a more thorough knowledge of its social and econ- 
omic importance. The meeting will not last more than 
an hour. Those who attend will most surely enjoy an 
entertainment of high order. Let everyone be present. 

The Athenians met on Friday evening. The first 
number on the program was a critique of " Shirley," 
by W. B. Smith. This number was followed by an 
essay on " The Evolution of Transportation," written 
by Mr. Cragin and read by J. H. Jones. The special 
feature of the evening followed, a paper by Professor 
Stuart on the Roman Drama. After the paper came 
the rendering of a portion of Plautus' comedy, known 
as the " Two Captives;" the parts in this were taken by 
J. G. Coulter, D. Fales and A. O. Jackson. Several 
visitors were present from the Academy and from the 
Zeta Epsilon Societv. 

Mr. W. H. Humiston, '91, has been secured to train 
the University Glee Club once a week. This is a good 
step. Hard work must be done however, for but seven 
week remains for practice before the club is expected 
to take its spring tour. The members of the club have 
just been selected. They are as follows: First tenor, 

E. B. Uline, W. H. Dudley, C. G. Smith, II. W. Har- 
ris and W. E. Pratt; Second tenor, \V. L. Bray, A. P. 
Bourns, D. Fales and J. C. Linninger; First bass, J. H. 
Rice, H. P. Didrickson, M. K. Baker and C. A. Cool- 
idge; Second bass P. H. .Seymour, W. F. Curry, H. 
Moore and F. E. North. 

The Day of Prayer for schools and colleges which 
occurred last Thursday was a day's rest from books and 
recitations fruitfully spent. In the morning Dr. H. A. 
Tohnson of the 41st St. Presbyterian Church, Chicago, 
addressed the students, faculty and town people in the 
church chapel on the deficiency and need of personal 
work in the cause of Christ. In the afternoon of the 
same day Dr. Johnson and Dr. Coulter met with the 
College and Academv students in the College chapel. 
Another meeting was held at Ferry Hall for the young 
ladies. Both meetings were well attended and it is 
believed that much good was accomplished. 

The program rendered by the Zeta Epsilon Society 
on Friday evening, Ian. 26th, was as follows: Debate, 
Resolved, that in trials before a jury of twelve a two- 
thirds vote of the jurors shall be sufficient to return a 
verdict. Affirmative debaters were A. P. Bourns and 

F. S. Mellen; negative, T. F. Marshall and 11. M. 
Moore. Decision of judges, two for the affirmative, 
one for the negative. E. C. Cleveland gave an im- 
promptu on "How I Would Run a Bank," a critique 
by J. H. Rice, and a talk by C. B. Moore followed. An 
impromptu debate was held on the question "Resolved, 
that College faculties should forbid the playing of foot- 
ball." The debaters were II. Thorn and F. A. 
Ilayner. 



Prof. McNeill chose a novel subject for his chapel 
talk last Tuesday. His talk on " New Stars" was in- 
tensely interesting. He mentioned the different kind 
of stars, the fixed, variable and the new stars. He 
showed how this last named variety has given interest 
and impetus to astronomical study, being the real cause 
for the catalogue of the stars, the finding of the law 
of gravitation and the invention of the spectroscope. 
He then spoke of the new star which was found two 
years ago and of the theories accounting for its appear- 
ance. It was found that the light came from two 
bodies, one a gaseous and the other a solid body sur- 
rounded by gaseous materials, the most rational theory 
being that the light was produced by a collision of the 
two bodies or their coming within range of one another. 

Dr. Coulter has been abroad during most of the 
past week. On Sunday, Jan. 21st, he preached in St. 
Louis twice, addressing in the morning the people of 
Dr. Nichol's church, one of the strongest churches in 
the city. The notices of Dr. Coulter in the St. Louis 
papers were very complimentary. On the following 
Tuesday evening he gave the students of Carroll Col- 
lege (academy) and the town people of Waukesha his 
lecture on the "National Park," and had the pleasure 
of meeting its Senior class, some of whom said they 
would probably make Lake Forest their Alma Mater. 
The next day he addressed the students of Highland 
Park Military Academy, which institution observed that 
day as the Day of Prayer for Schools and Colleges. Then 
Friday and Saturday he was in Indianapolis on Uni- 
versity extension work, lecturing before two different 
classes; one Friday evening and the other Saturday 
morning. Some of the members of these classes will 
undoubtedly be in Lake Forest next year. Dr. Coul- 
ter's scheme for university development has been sent 
to all the trustees. The chief points in the scheme are 
that our first and very vital wants are a recitation hall 
and student cottages. We believe that there is nothing 
so much needed as these same cottages. 



ENTERTAINMENT BY THE Y. M. C. A. 

The entertainment to be given on Saturday even- 
ing, Feb. 3, in Ferry Hall chapel by the Y. M. C. A. 
promises to be a very pleasant occasion. Prof. Booth 
will read several selections in his well-known pleasing 
style, the University Glee Club will sing, and there will 
also be other musical numbers. Seats will not be 
reserved ; admission 35 cents. After the program a 
general reception will be held in the Seminary parlors. 



The American School at Athens is in a very flour- 
ishing condition. In a letter to Prof. Goodrich from 
Prof. Richardson, the director of the school, it is stated 
that eleven students are enrolled this year. — Ex. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 




■^rtthhim 



sso&iatwn 




N« 



made 



FERRY HALL. 



Whv not' 



will give an 



E 



ntertainment 

Consisting of numbers by the 



GLEE CLUB 
BANJO CLUB 
MANDOLIN CLUB 

Introducing many Specialties 
Sparkling with Fun. 

The whole to be crowned by 
The roaring Farce Comedy 

WHICH IS WHICH? 

at the 

JI. C. J)urantjlrt Institute, 

FRIDAY EVC, FEB. 16. 

Tickets 75c. and SI. 00. 



Miss Louise Dauer, of Chicago, was the guest of 
Vinnie Gilleland over Sunday. 

Miss Eva B niton was called home Thursday morn- 
ing owing to the serious illness of her sister. 

Mrs. Seeley gave one of her delightful teas Mon- 
day afternoon to the Seniors of L. F. U. Further notice 
next week. 

We are all pleased to have Miss Phelps among us 
once more after an illness of about ten days. Her duties 
have been well attended to by Miss Stanley. 

The Misses Stoddard gave a very enjoyable candy 
pull in the Gymnasium on Saturday evening, in honor 
of Miss Theodore Macomber, of the class of '93. 

Dr. Seeley has deemed it expedient to reprimand 
some of the young ladies for repeated tardinesses to 
meals. Now is the time to lepra to be prompt. Start 
when the bell rings! ! 

The Seniors had another one of their enjoyable 
feasts Wednesday evening. These same spreads tend 
to preserve the natural good humor of the girls and 
foster a spirit of unity. 

Miss Mcintosh and Miss Harris were at home to a 
number of their friends Saturday evening from four 
o'clock to six. This charming tea was in honor of Miss 
Gilbert, of Chicago. Dainty refreshments were served, 
and the guests were entertained in a pleasing manner. 

Thursday, the "Dav of Prayer for schools and col- 
leges," was a holiday for all. In the morning we lis- 
tened to a verv pleasing a instructive address, ably pre- 
sented by Rev. Johnstone, of 41st St. Church, Chicago. 
He is a speaker who easily wins his way into the hearts 
of his hearers. In the afternoon exercises were con- 
ducted in the Ferry Hall chapel. Dr. McClure and Mr. 
Holt contributed largely to the success of the meeting. 

On Monday evening, at four o'clock, the chapel was 
the scene of direct agony "prolonged and unbroken" 
for the space of two hours. The cause was the second 
reunion of the Seniors for the purpose of showing the 
Faculty, together with Miss Fleming, what their fertile 
minds could devise in the way of literary productions. 
The pupils seemed to stand the ordeal well but one of 
the teachers, on account of "that tired feeling," was 
forced to abandon some work which she had planned 
for the evening. 

"It snows, cries the school-boy," but not he alone, 
nor the school-girl also vents her gladness at the first 
snow-fal lwith piercing shouts of joy. A cry of delight 
was heard, especially when some of the voting ladies 
were invited to accompany the members of the "Alpha- 
bet Club" in a sleigh-ride Thursday evening. Although 
the number thirteen would tend to predict many mis- 
haps, yet such was not the case. Owing to the precau- 
tions of the young gentlemen in securing a skillful ( r) 
driver and a firm (?) carry-all, everything passed off 
pleasantly. After viewing for a time the beauties of 
moonlight scenes, the jolly party stopped at Mrs. Wil- 
liams', where an elegant repast was served. As young 
ladies have the reputation of being unable to keep a 
secret, they were denied the right to be installed as 
members of this young society. Yet that matters but 
little, as long as it is permitted us to share their joys. 



10 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



ATHLETICS. 

The Hare-and-IIound Club has already taken one 
run which was participated in by twenty-three men. 

It has been suggested that the game of basket ball 
b^ introduced here. As there is room enough in the 
Gymnasium a team should be organized and games 
arranged with some outside teams. This game besides 
being extremely interesting is one of the best things 
known for general training work. 

"The Athlete's Guide" is the name of a small book 
published by Spalding Bros. This contains articles on 
each event in track athletics besides the general rules 
of the "Amateur Athletic Union." The price is twenty- 
five cents, and as each article is written by the several 
champions, every one who intends to train for field-day 
should get one. 

Work for baseball has begun in earnest. Captain 
Havner has posted the training rules, in which he re- 
quires candidates to play hand-ball at least twice a week, 
and run a half mile out doors every day. Besides this, 
work in throwing will be done and the me:? will prac- 
tice sliding bases. A large number of men have become 
candidates and the prospects far a winning team are 
very good. 

Hand-ball is creating a large amount of enthusiasm 
here at present. There will be an athletic entertainment 
in the gymnasium early next term at which there will be 
several hand-ball games, so several teams have been or- 
ganized and are training hard. These games will of course 
be held in the evening by lamplight and in order to get 
in trim the large chandeliers ought to be lighted two or 
three times a week in the evening. 

A recent article on athletics at Chicago University 
states that their base-ball prospects are excellent and 
the team is hard at work under Stagg's management- 
Their track team is also at work and they seem to think 
they have some winners, especially in shorter distances.* 
It was also stated that Chicago would not join any 
league as they preferred to be "free lances," so the 
triple league prospects have disappeared for the pre- 
sent. 

In last weeks issue we called a'tention to the 
neglected state of the gymnasium apparatus. This 
neglect does not stop here, but seems to extend to the 
whole building as was shown during the last snow 
storm when one of the windows was so out of shape 
that it could not be closed, and as a consequence a large 
pitch of snow about an inch deep was found, on the 
running; track the next day. This melted and pait of 
it ran off onto the floor below. Another fault is that 
the steam is turned off every night and every thing 
becomes covered with frost. The stream rising from 
the warm water in the tank goes all through the build- 



ing and is turned into frost. On a couple of cold nights 
last week there was, in some places, frost a half inch 
deep. When the steam was turned on, this all melted 
and dropped into the running track and the floor. As 
a result the track could not be used and scarcely any- 
thing could be done on the floor without danger of fall- 
ing. Besides this it warps the floor and if it happens 
very often, the building will soon be ruined. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

The Academy senior class enjoyed a delightful 
afternoon tea in Ferry Hall yesterday, on the invitation 
of Mrs. Seelev. 

Prof. Dudley's double quartette is now the glee 
club of the Academy. The Academy never stands 
behind in anything, and the formation of the glee club 
is an additional proof of this fact. 

Last Friday evening the seniors accepted an invita- 
tion of the Athemean Society of the College, and had 
the privilege of listening to an interesting program, 
;uk1 enjoying especially the rendering of the Latin 
comedy "The Captives." 

While the Tri Kappa was holding its declamatory 
contest in the Reid Hall chapel, the Gamma Sigma 
preliminary debate was in progress in the Gamma Sigma 
Society hall. The debate was a most excellent one, and 
the decision of Che judges was exceedingly close. Mr. 
Brown was the winner. 

The Tri Kappa society held its preliminary contest 
in declamation last Wednesday morning. There were 
seven dectaimers, of whom Messrs. Andrew Cooke and 
J. I. Loughlin were selected by the judges to represent 
the society in the spring contest. The judges were Dr. 
Haven, Prof. Bridgman, and Mr. Chas. Wells. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOK 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

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ice cream and salads of all kinds 

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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., Presiden. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 
Professor of the Principles and Practice 
of Medicine. 

[AMES II. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. I). 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

• JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 
SHIRT MAKERS AMD |{ ^P^B. { MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



TACOMA BUILDING, 
151 MADISON STREET. 



Chicago. 



w. j. root, 



HIGH ART 



Kimball Hall, 243 Wabash Ave., 
CHICAGO. 

MEDAL AWARDED AT THE WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 



Ink, Pastel and Crayon Portraits. 
SEPIA MY SPE CIALT Y 

E. R. MARTIN, 

Artist Photographer! 

78 STATE STREET, 

KRANZ BUILDING 
TAKE ELEVATOR CHICAGO, I LL. 



DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

/EDDING & PRESENTATION 
GOODS, 

At Sacrifice Prices. 

First Floor Masonic Temple. 



MARLINs*"" 



de in all styles and sizes. Lightest, 

I strongest, easiest working, safest, simplest, 

I most accurate, most compact, and most 

I modern. Fur sale by all dealers In arms. 

Catalogues mailed free by 

The Marlin Fire Arms Co.. 

New Haven-, Coks., r. S. A. 



Candy 
Candy 
Candy 



Send $1.25. $2.10 or $3.50 for 
a sample retail box by express, 
of the best candies in America, 
put up in Elegant Boxes and 
Strictly Pure. Suitable for 
presents. Express charges pre- 
paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all Chicago. Try it once. 
ADDRESS, 

CFGUNTHER 

CONFECTIONER 

212 STATE STREET, 

CHICAGO. 



TRIFLES 



W°he gelebpgjed Essei? 

D. R. COOVER. 

Ipbotoorapber, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 



ST DFlSfTS ^ ix ' sent ' n .^ ^ lls a d- will be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

$ The Model Clothing House, 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., 

'The [V]0del" makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN, 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats tP Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. "Verium Sat Sapient/: 1 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE f^Uirurr^ 

S. E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets, V^lllUAUvJ. 



Vol. VII. 



February 6, 18 
> 1 * 



4 



No. ik 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co-educational. 



AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

6. GHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO. ILL. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of wor and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college wor, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French, 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surge? y, and Law. 
For circulars of information concerning any department of the Cniversity, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 

THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Present American law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a svstem 
and manner that has never been surpassed. And so the American law student finds sooner or later that 
he must familiarize himself with it; of the several editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. 
Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He 
has erased the ohso[ete and irrevalent notes of earlier commentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the 
American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on the constitution and laws of the United 
States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as teacher and expounder of the 
law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supplemented the work by 
several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large measure, a 
student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestions for the Study of the Law," " Editor's Review," 
"Local Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," 
" Territories of the United States." 

These few significant sentences from Judge Cooky's work should be read by every law student: 

" And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the fields 
of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its tempting 
prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, nor fail to explore 
the abundant stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

" Nor, although there are many things in Blackstone, which have ceased to be important in the practical administration of the 
law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished or obsolete 
may nevertheless, have furnished the reasons for the things which remain; and to study rules while ignoring their reasons would 
be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is noticeable also, that though 
in England, where the common law and the statutes mentioned by this author have been so greatly changed by recent legislation, 
* * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much of the recent English legislation has 
no importance, even bv way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Blackstone is much the most useful, as presenting 
us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to America, leaving us to trace in our statutes and 
decisions its subsequent changes here, unembarrassed by irrevalent information about parliamentary legislation which in no way 
concerns us." 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. third edition, revised and enlarged. 

TWO VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO STUDENTS, $9.50, PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE- 

Callaghan & Company, 1 14 Monroe St., Chicago. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



MANl.TACTLIKEHS OF 



Athletic ^Sporting Goods of every description 

The National League Ball, Bats, Catchers Gloves and Mitts, 
Masks. Body Protectors, etc. The Spalding Tournament 
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Nets, Court Measures, Markers, Poles, Forks; etc. Uniforms 
and Clothing for all Sports, Outing and Gymnasium Use. The 
finest imported Serges and Flannels. Newest Styles and 
Patterns. sen i fo => our new catologue 




CHICAGO: 
108 nadison St. 



NEW YORK: 
24s Broadway. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
1032 Chestnut St. 



Skating Is enjoyed by all. 

But to see the new College Stationery 

which we have just received is lo buy it. 
Come around and look it over. 

Ruled or unruled, any way you want it. 
Envelopes to match. 

Pads containing 100 sheets, 2s cents. 
2s Envelopes, - - 10 cents. 

Rice Bros. 



TOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 



Dr. JOHN HENRY BARROWS GREAT HISTORY 



OF 



of the THE WORLD S 

PARLIAMENT 

RELIGIONS 



In Two Volumes— 700 Pages each. The only official, reliable, full 
and authentic report of the most notable congress of modern times. 

A. HABERLI, AGENT FOR LAKE FOREST 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1894 



No. 



THE LITTLE ONE DID IT. 



John Renolds worked in the shops and made good 
money too, for he was a steady lad, a little head-strong 
to be sure, but generous hearted. His heart was in the 
little home for which a part of his week's wages went 
regularly to make it really and truly his own. 

Mary, his wife, was a pleasant body, a tit mate for 
"Johnny"; a good woman and a church member. She 
wanted John to join, but he rather held off saying, 
"Wait till we get the home paid for and then we can 
go in style, we and the little one." 

The little one was the prettiest child in four neigh- 
borhoods, with curls and all that make a young one 
sweet and nice. 

Saturday Johnny came home and put his pail on the 
sink, hung up his hat and coat without a word and then 
sat down. Mary knew something was up, but wisely 
kept still until supper was nicely laid upon the table, 
and said as though nothing had happened: 

"Come, John, supper 's ready." 

"I don't want no supper, Mary." 

"O come, Johnny, its so good — the pastry — come — 
you and baby." 

"I can't, I'd choke" — and he stared the harder at 
the fire. 

"What is it?" She went and stood quite close to 
him, with her hand on his shoulder. 

He didn't say anything for a while anil then ex- 
claimed: 

"They ain't much to tell, only I'm a fool. You see 
McCarty — the foreman — he's had it in for me since 
way back and to-day, he struck little Dan next door and 
I told him what 1 thought of him and asked him to hit 
a feller his size. He didn't say anything, only walked 
away, and when I drew my pay, they told me not to 
come any more." 

Mary could have cried, but he never knew it. A 
woman can cry all day, and a man won't know it if she 
don't want him to. 

"Perhaps you can get work somewhere else, you're 
such a good workman." 

But he shook his head. "Not these hard times. 
Most likely we'll be turned out into the street. I 
wouldn't care if it wasn't for you and the little one." 

It was a gloomy meal and a restless night. The 
next morning, Sunday, Mary was hurrying around, and 
had the little girl all dressed up. 

"Come, John, its most church time." 

"I ain't a going," he said in a surly tone, "They 



don't want poor folks," and he stubbornly put his head 
down on his hands. 

Mary did not say anything, but kept on getting 
ready and whispered something to the little girl. 

"Poppey, me want to church," and she pulled his 
hands from his face and stood on her tip toes trying to 
kiss him. He could not resist but got up and put on 
his hat and coat. 

At the big church, the usher took them way up in 
front, and the little one sat between them watching the 
choir and the minister. By and by this got tiresome 
and she slipped down, and stood awhile at her father's 
knee, and then out into the aisle, where she walked hack 
touching each post and gravely looking up into the 
people's faces. They all smiled at her, and the 
women folks ached to kiss her. Way in the back part 
of the church she found a big man who bail come in 
late and seated himself in one of the last pews. She 
liked him, he looked so big and grand, so she asked 
him if he was a "p'liceman." 

He smiled and lifted her to the seat beside him, and 
she began to talk, telling him about her doll and her 
dog, and mamma and papa and how he lost his job and 
how bad he felt, how most likely they would have to 
live in the street like a little girl she knew of. 

The great organ sounded and all the people stood 
up. She stood on the seat with one arm half about her 
new friend and he held a book so she could see it and 
they sang. 

When it was over, the big man took her in his arms 
and waited until her father and mother came along, and 
then politely asked them which way they were walk- 
ing, and walked with them, down to the corner, where 
he sat the little one down, saving, "I must leave you 
here. Your little girl says you had some miifortune. 
What firm did you work for?" 

Johnny told him, and the big man quietly took out 
a card and said : 

"Perhaps we can do something for you if you will 
call at the office," and he kissed the little girl again and 
lifting his hat so grandly, went away. 

Johnny handled the card awkwardly, and reading 
the address slowly, said aloud, "Why he's my boss!" 

Mary only said, "Aren't you glad you came?" 

He said, "Molly did it."" 

Somehow the sun looked brighter and the ugh' 
little swallows really seemed to sing. But after all isn't 
the world as we look at it and things bright or ugly 
as we are? F. A. Hayner. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



PRIZE ESSAYS. 

The American Pence Society of Boston offers this 
year three prizes, of $100, $50, and $25 respectively, 
for the three best essays on the "Economic Waste of 
War," to be competed for by the members of the 
Senior and Junior classes (those in the regular courses 
leading to the Bachelor's degree) of the Colleges and 
Universities of the United States. 

It is intended that the treatment of the subject shall 
be in the form of an argument against war. The sub- 
ject may be so extended as to cover not only direct 
waste of money and property in war and war prepara- 
tions, and the burdens of taxation, but also any conse- 
quent derangement of commerce, international distrust 
affecting trade relations, loss of life as affecting the pro- 
ductive industries, and the moral character of war so far 
as involved in its economic waste. 

The conditions under which the prizes are offered 
are as follows: 

1. Each College or University competing shall 
forward but one essay to the American Peace Society 
the choice between the essavs written by the Seniors 
and Juniors of said institution to be made by its Faculty, 
or by judges appointed by them. 

2. The essays shall contain not less than 2,000, nor 
more than 3,500 words. 

3. The copies of the essavs sent to the American 
Peace Society shall be type-written, and shall be at the 
disposal of the Society, to use as it may see fit. 

4. The comparative merits of the essays forwarded 
shall be determined by a committee named by the Am- 
erican Peace Society, who shall render their decision on 
(1) the force of the argument and (2) on the general 
character of the composition. 

5. The essays must be in the hands of the Ameri- 
can Peace Society not later than the 15th of July, 1S94. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Will The Stentor allow a word of suggestion as 
to the pioper use of the prefix, "Rev.?" I noticed in the 
last issue among the notes from Ferry Hall that the 
"Rev. Johnstone, of 41st St. Church, Chicago," ad- 
dressed the young ladies. This has of late become a 
common way, especially in western papers, of attaching 
a clergyman's title to his name, but it certainly is with- 
out the warrant of good usage. The Stentor, of 
course, as the literary exponent of a University, where 
choice learning and correct speech are supposed to pre- 
vail, wishes to have its pages free from all forms of ex- 
pression characteristic only of the lips of the uneducated 
and the columns of the daily press. Will it not there- 
fore print hereafter the Rev. Dr. Johnstone or the 
Rev. Mr. Johnstone and not such a late-invented bar- 
barism as Rev. Johnstone. A Friend. 



ATHLETICS. 

The Chicago University still keeps up foot-ball and 
has arranged a game between the second eleven and a 
team from Swift & Co. We also notice that Chicago 
has played some games of basket ball lately with out- 
side teams. 

There will, in all probability, be an athletic ex 
hibition at the beginning of next term. If the exhibi- 
tion is to be a success work should begin immediately 
and be kept up by those who intend to take part. 
Gymnasium work of any kind cannot be done well 
without long, hard practice, and unless it is done well 
it is not worth exhibiting. 

Now that we have a hand-ball court and there is so 
much interest manifested in the game, it would be a 
good thing to try and arrange a hand-ball tournament 
with Evanston or Chicago. As things are at present 
we have nothing during the winter to keep up interest 
in athletics except looking forward to base-ball in the 
spring. There are several good players here and a 
home tournament could be held and a couple of the 
winning teams could represent us if the other schools 
were agreeable. 

Some steps should be taken toward improving the 
diamond of the base ball field, which is all washed full 
of ditches and covered with loose sharp stones. An- 
other thing which might be done, if the University 
would furnish the ashes, would be to build a hundred 
yard cinder track. It would be impossible, on account 
of the slops of the field to put a track all the way 
around, but a stretch could be put in on one side which 
could be used by the short distance men and also for 
practicing starting. 

It is not too early to begin thinking about fixing up 
the tennis courts. These have been in rather poor shape 
for the past year or so, being overgrown in some 
places by grass and washed out in others, so that there 
are numerous hollows. It would seem that some 
scheme could be found by means of which the grass on 
the courts could be killed. Then, another thing, the 
back nets have become almost ruined. Players, instead of 
going around when a ball went over, followed the ball 
over the top, and in so doing, they tore the wire netting 
almost to pieces. There ought to be some penalty for 
this offence, by which it could be stopped. 

When Dr. Coulter found that the gymnasium was 
in as bad condition as reported he immediately prom- 
ised to improve it. We are to have most of the im- 
provements asked for. We hope now that the move- 
ment has been started, that it will continue until the 
furnishings are as fine as the building. But there is one 
thing which has not yet been secured, this is a set of 
lockers. Lockers can be bought or made for a modest 
sum and will not take up very much room. A hundred 
or so could be put in a very small space. These could 
be rented to the boys, and in a very short time would 
pay for themselves and would then be a source of rev- 
enue. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 
BIOLOGICAL CLUB MEETING. EXCHANGES. 



Prof. Locy gave another of his characteristic talks 
before the last supplemental}' meeting on "Primitive 
Segmentation of the Vertebrate Brain." After giving 
a short historical account of the work ahead}' done 
along this line, he proceeded to give the results of his 
own studies on the nervous system of the shark. Seg- 
mentation in the neural area appears much earlier than 
had been heretofore noted. It is easilv discernable in 
the first group of cells constituting neural tissue, and 
may be traced in its consecutive stages of development 
to the later segments recognized by earlier biologists. 

The very primitive character of the segments is 
significant in its suggestion as to the ancestry of verte- 
brates. In the very young embryo the segments are 
not confined to the neural area but really precede the 
appearance of that region, and may therefore be con- 
sidered as body segments, such as may be seen in the 
crayfish and worm. 

Prof. Locv's investigations serve to confirm the 
theory known as concrescence of the germ-band. He 
has also discovered a set of facts that will enable anatom- 
ists to more accurately determine the limitations of the 
embyonic head from the very first formation of the 
embryo. 



TOWN TOPICS. 



Mr. Arthur Reid grave a sleigh-ride Thursday even- 



Several young people of Lake Forest enjoyed a 
sleigh-ride Friday evening. Snpper was furnished by 
Miss May Giles. 

The University Club met last Thursday at the home 
of Prof. Bridgman. Rev.Jenkin Lloyd Jones lectured 
"Browning" and several tableaux of Browning charac- 
ters were presented by several young ladies. 

The officers of the Christian Endeavor Society are 
as follows: — President, David Fales, Jr.; Vice Presi- 
dent, Miss Margaret Moore; Corresponding Secretary, 
Miss Grace Coulter; Recording Secretary, Miss Abigail 
Davies; Treasurer, Albert Cobb. 



The new machine shops at Purdue University, just 
dedicated, were recently destroyed by fire. The shops 
cost $100,000 and were the finest and most complete of 
any American College. 

We see the name of IL H. Manchester, ex-'93, in 
in the list as one of the editors of the new literary mag- 
azine issued at Chicago University, The Caht»iet. 

A Georgia editor, in a fit of desperation, dashed off 
the following: — " The wind bloweth, the water floweth, 
the farmer soweth, and the subscriber oweth and the 
Lord knoweth that we are in need of our dues. So 
come a runnin', ere we go a gunnin'; this thing of dun- 
nin' gives us the blues." 

The Northwestern this week contains a cut of the 
new Orrington Lunt Library Building, which, when 
completed, will cost about $100,000. It will contain a 
reading-room which will accommodate 250 readers 
The capacity of the building will be about 12^,000 
volumes. On the second floor there will be an assem- 
bly room which will seat 500 and a lecture room for 

'-5- 

Columbia College has bought a site on Cathedral 
Heights and expects to move from the central part of 
New York City to the new location some time in the 
future. 

There will be a joint debate between Michigan and 
Northwestern some time this spring. Inter-collegiate 
debates are verv numerous this vear. Harvard has al- 
ready won one debate from Yale this year and now 
there will be a series of debates between Harvard, 
Yale and Princeton. Other Inter-collegeate debates 
have been arranged among western colleges. 

Sketches and short stories of every name fill the 
columns of many exchanges. They certainly are in- 
teresting, and some of them show literary merit, but 
from the point of view of an exchange-man they fur- 
nish nothing of Inter-collegiate interest. 

We have received this week a copy of the Reveille 
from Pennsylvania Military College. J. A. Blooming- 
ston, ex-'c).)., is assistant editor, and contributes an arti- 
cle on the development of English literature. Mention 
is also made of an oration delivered by him on an ab- 
struse subject. Our quondam friend has evidently be- 
come a literary man, though some of the local items 
seem to indicate that he is still the same old "Bloomy." 

President Andrews, of Brown L T niversity, has re- 
fused the positions of Chancellor of Chicago University 
and head professor of the Department of Philosophy at 
a salary of $10,000 a year and six months leave of ab- 
sence. 

The offer of prizes at the local prohibition oratorical 
contest at Champaign has made it very popular among 
the students. Many of the best orators of the school 
have entered the contest. 



6 THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 



Harry L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94. | 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 



tudes. One of the best ways of accomplishing 
this highly desirable end is by means of 
" Commons," which may be defined as an all- 
issued weekly by the lake forest university stentor i nc l us i ve co-operative dining association. The 

PUBLISHING COMPANY. .... 

plan is similar to that of our present clubs, 
except that it is carried out on a more exten- 
sive scale, and different grades of board are 
furnished to suit different grades of pocket 
books, if so desired. At Harvard the Dining 
Association supplies over a thousand with the 
best of board at cost price. While we could 
not form so large an association, still it is quite 
possible to co-operate on quite an extensive 
scale, and thus secure much better board for 
the same prices which we are now paying. 
Such an association would be managed by a 
duly elected board of directors. It would be a 
strictly business affair, with no division on 

Advertising Rates on application. . 

Address all Commmunications to the society Or Other lines. 

Lake Forest University Stentor. 

Lake Forest, Illinois. $ 

* ' * 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest. III., as second-class matter. 



A. 0. Jackson, '96, ) 






L.ocais 


Prof. J. J. Halsey, 


- 


- 


Alumni 


D. H. Jackson. 96, 






Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '95, 




- 


Exchanges 


Miss Eudora Smith. 


'94, 




Aletheian 


Miss F. Somerville, 
Miss Mabel Palmer, 


I 
1 


- 


Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, ^ 
I!. S. Cutler, ) 




- 


Academy 


A. P. Bourns. '94, 




- 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 




- 


Advertising 






TERMS 




Per Year, in . 


ADVANCE, 


|1.50 


Single Copies, 




- 


.05 



T 



* ' or ' 



HE first semester under the "new regime" 
came to a close last week. The changes 
introduced in the studies at the beginning of 
the year have had time to get the "newness" 
pretty well rubbed off, and all is now moving 
smoothly. 

Lake Forest's courses of study have always 
been excellent, but the new curriculum made 
all the changes which were advisable and pos- 
sible. The world moves in educational as well 
as material lines, and it is a satisfaction to be on successive days. That the modern tendency 



EXAMINATIONS. 

'E have just passed through an epidemic 
examinations. It was a mild epidemic 
however, much milder than we have previously 
had at regular intervals. By a recent action 
of the Faculty examinations are left to the 
option of the instructor, and are restricted in 
length to one hour, the usual recitation period, 
though some of the teachers escaped that 
limitation by having two or more examinations 



in the van of the movement anil not following 
in the rear. 



A 



N exceedingly practical question which 



is in favor of abandoning the antiquated sys- 
tem of half-day written examinations is also 
shown by the recent action of Cornell Univer- 
sity. Notwithstanding the fact that instruction 
is there given by lectures entirely, still term 



comes home to every College student at examinations will hereafter be dispensed with, 

the outset of every college year is, "where to and the student's standing will be determined 

net something to eat." The residents of the by "quizzes" and occasional tests. The old 

town, almost to a unit, refuse to take boarders, system no doubt tempts the careless scholar to 

and it is next to impossible to find a place for rely on "cramming," or worse, on "cribbing," 

a dining club. If the College is to increase in to make up for poor work throughout the term, 

size, as it is hoped that it will, some provision But even to the best and most faithful stu- 

should be made to feed the expected multi- dents, final examinations are always a disaree- 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



able bugbear. We believe that the majority 
of both professors and students are in favor 
of doing away with the time honored method » 
which tried to do a term's work in a week. 



A JOINT DEBATE. 

DEBATING is coming to take a prominent 
position in the literary life of American 
colleges. The daily as well as the college 
press has recently contained long accounts of 
local and inter-collegiate debates, showing the 
interest which is taken in this form of exercise 
in our sister sbhools. The University of Wis- 
consin seems to be the storm-center of the 
movement in the West. There the annual 
"joint debate'' between the debating societies 
is the literary event of the year. This fact 
suggests the feasibility of having such a debate 
here, between the literary societies, and mak- 
ing it a regular annual occurrence. A joint 
meeting of the College societies is now being 
considered, but merely for the purpose of com- 
memorating Washington's Birthday, and there 
would be no debate on the program. A debate 
between the societies could not fail to be inter- 
esting and instructive. The question should 
be a political or economic one, and should 
require original investigation. There could 
be two, three or even more speakers 
on each side. The winning speakers could 
represent the University in an inter-collegiate 
debate, as is done in Wisconsin and Minnesota 
Universities. 

The first step necessary, in case the students 
approve of the idea, would be for the society 
officers to arrange a joint meeting with the 
debate as the main feature. Such a meeting 
might be held early next term. We commend 
the plan to the consideration of literary so- 
cieties. 

* * 
* 

SUBSCRIPTIONS to The Stentor are now 
due, and should be paid to the Business 
Manager. 




lamon 



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FRIDAY EVG., FEB. 16. 

Tickets 75c. and SI. 00. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Have you heard the quartette try to sing "Amen?" 

Athletic entertainment next week, Friday evening. 
Tickets sale the last of this week. 

Mr. C. A. Coolidge was called home last Saturday 
by the sudden illness of his grandmother. 

E. H. McNeal,ex-'o,5, familiarly known as "Redda," 
spent Friday and Saturday with C. G. Smith. 

The engagement of Miss Louise Baker, of Chicago, 
to Edmund F. Dodge, '91, has been announced. 

The University Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs 
had their pictures taken last Saturday by Messrs. Sey- 
mour and Harris. 

Many dead issues were revered, and most of the live 
ones discussed in the oration delivered in Prof. Jack's 
rhetoric class last week. 

Some of the professors dispensed with examinations 
in their respective classes, but others, r as if to make up 
for this, gave two and even three examinations. 

President Coulter made a trip to Indianapolis on 
Friday and Saturday to deliver addresses in his series 
of University extension botanical lectures. 

Arrangements are being made for a "Biblical Insti- 
tute" to be held in Lake Forest, beginning Feb. 23. A 
full announcement will be made next week. 

On Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 6, Dr. Coulter gave a 
lecture before the Y. M. C. A. training class of Chi- 
cago, and in the evening of the same day he addressed 
the directors of the association. 

The gymnasium classes are showing great improve- 
ment in their work, going through the various exercises 
almost perfectly. The instructor is to be commended 
for the good work he is doing. 

Miss Milford, formerly a professor in Yassar Col- 
lege for six; years, is making Lake Forest quite a visit, 
spending most of her time in naming her Idaho collec- 
tion of plants which she gathered a year or so ago. 

Rev. J. J. Boggs, 'SS, addressed the Young People's 
Society Sunday evening on the cause of missions in 
China. We understand Mr. Boggs intends to return 
to China as a missionary, some time in the near future. 

The marriage of Graham Lee, 'S9, and Miss 
Blanche Webb took place January 10th at Evansville. 
Indiana. The bride and groom will soon start for 
Seoul, Karca, where Mr. Lee will take up his mission- 
ary work. 

Monday, Feb. 1 2th, is Lincoln's birthday, which we 
understand is a legal holiday in this State, but owing to 
the extensive preparations made for the celebration of 
Washington's birthday, it will probably not be spe- 
cially observed in Lake Forest. 



Lake Forest at last has a Prohibition Club. It has 
officers who are now in College, (a statement which 
can be made by no other political club in Lake Forest). 
On Wednesday evening last Mr. Richardson addressed 
the students with the hope of raising some Prohibition 
enthusiasm, but signally failed. The failure was mu- 
tually caused by audience and speaker. 

We are not averse to a little noise about the College 
dormitory when a majority of the students are in it, 
but when four Freshmen on the fourth floor amuse 
themselves rolling cannon balls at all hours of the night 
and scrambling for pennies like a lot of street Arabs, 
we enter a vigorous protest. It's about time the fourth 
floor learned to behave like civilized beings. If they 
have no common sense, they might at least pretend to 
have. 

Among the gayeties of the past week the meeting 
of the Senior Club shone as a particular star. The 
program was chiefly musical, with impromptu literary 
efforts, in which Mr. Williams made the best hit. The 
music was furnished by Misses Bird and Mcintosh, 
Miss Dickenson, Mr. Curry and the College Quartette. 
The committee in charge of the next meeting is com- 
posed of E. A. Drake, Miss Somerville and Harry 
Goodman. 

The Athenian Societv, at their regular meeting on 
Friday evening, had what might be termed a "Cleve- 
land Program." The first number was a biographical 
sketch of Grover Cleveland, by C. H. Morrison, fol- 
lowed by a paper by Mr. Woolsey on the policy of the 
present administration. The next was made up of two 
parts, an Invective against Grover Cleveland, by H. G. 
Timbeilake, and a Eulogy by C. G. Smith. Mr. Tim- 
berlake's invective was admirable, and was all the more 
praised, when it was found that the speaker was a 
staunch Democrat. 

The interest in the Zeta Epsilon meeting of last 
Friday evening centered chieflv on the debate, "Re- 
solved, that the A. P. A. is detrimental to our coun- 
try," which was decided by the judges unanimously in 
favor of the negative. The speakers for the affirmative 
were G. T. B. Davis and F. C. Ritchie; for the nega- 
tive, J. W. Currens and F. Moriette. Then followed 
music by F. A. Hayner, J. C. Lininger and C. A. 
Coolidge, a declamation by L Stearns, an oration by E. 
E. Yance on "The Americans in Politics," and an im- 
promptu by Wm. B. Hunt on "Advantages of Early 
Life on the Farm." 

We clip the following notice of President Coulter's 
lecture on the "National Park": 

"Very seldom does an audience listen with such 
wrapt attention to a lecturer as the one which faced the 
President of Lake Forest University last Tuesday even- 
ing. There is a peculiar and indescribable charm about 
D''. Coulter. His voice is winning, his speech fluent 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



and enunciation perfect. From beginning to end he 
was interesting. We congratulate the Lake Forest 
students on the acquisition of such a man. May this 
not be his last visit to Waukesha." — Carroll Echo. 

Prof. Steve's chapel talk on the "Laboratories in 
Colleges and Other Educational Institutions," on last 
Tuesday morning, was historical rather than descrip- 
tive, lie placed the origin of the laboratory in human 
doubt. Its utility lay in its capacity for clearing away 
this same doubt. The first laboratories were astronomi- 
cal observatories. The first chemical laboratory was 
founded in Germany in 1S25 and now few schools out- 
side of the district school in the country arc considered 
complete without one or more laboratories. The work 
in the laboratory makes a man self-reliant, develops in- 
dividuality and encourages original investigation. 

Washington's birthday is in a fair wav to receive 
proper celebration at the hands of students and faculty. 
The students' committee, consisting of A. P. Bourns, 
C. G. Smith and Miss Gilleland, has met with the 
faculty committee on entertainments, of which Prof. 
Dawson is chairman. Their plans, though as yet quite 
embryonic, are as follows: The meeting is to be ad- 
dressed in the morning at Ferry Hall chapel by Con- 
gressman "Billy" Mason, of Chicago. Mr. N. D. 
Pratt, it is hoped, will train a chorus for the purpose of 
singing patriotic songs. The vice-presidents of the 
three College societies have also arranged a program 
for a joint meeting on the evening of the day. 

The V. M. C. A. entertainment at Ferry Hall, on 
Saturday evening, was a thorough success, socially and 
financially. The program consisted of a song by the 
College Octette, "Down by the River Side," which was 
very heartily received, especially the encore verses. 
Prof. Booth read a selection from "Sohrab and Rus. 
turn," followed by a duet by Misses Stoddard and 
Mercer. Then a humorous description of the Giant's 
Causeway, read by Prof. Booth, and a song by E. F. 
Dodge, '91, concluded the exercises, after which the 
company adjourned to the Seminary parlors for an in- 
formal sociable, which pleasantly occupied the remain- 
der of the evening. 

The Aletheian program for Friday evening con- 
sisted of a vocal solo by Miss McLean; oration, Miss 
Gilson; news of the week, by Miss Mellen; debate, 
"Resolved, that in co-educational colleges the literary 
societies should consist of both sexes," affirmative, Miss 
Hodge, negative, Miss McKee; banjo solo, by Miss 
Phelps, and a selection by the Aletheian Quartette. 
The dull routine of the business meeting was enlivened 
by a ten-minute parliamentary law exercise in charge of 
Miss McKee. The subject discussed and practiced was 
"how to open, conduct and adjourn an occasional or 
mass meeting." 



There is a movement on foot among the young 
women of the College to organize a Y. M. C. A. We 
have felt the need of such an organization for some 
time, not only in our own Christian experience and per- 
sonal work, but in the fact that we are entirely out of 
touch with the other colleges, and so miss the help and 
enthusiasm which we might otherwise have in our 
work. 

The Aletheian Society, believing that it should be 
more in the nature of a training school for all its mem- 
bers, has introduced several new plans which serve to 
bring more members into service each evening. * Each 
week the president appoints a chairman and a chaplain 
for the next literary meeting, also a chairman for the 
next week's parliamentary law exercise and a committee 
of three to be in charge of the same. These appoint- 
ments, together with the regular committees and stated 
officers, serve to bring over half of the members into 
active service at every meeting of the society. These 
plans are proving very helpful and at times decidedly in- 
teresting to mere observers. 



FERRY HALL. 

Mr. Mcintosh visited his sister, Allevne, Sunday. 

On Friday evening, Miss Phelps gave an informal 
tea to a few of the teachers. 

Miss Trumble, of Chicago, was entertained by Miss 
Burchel Saturday and Sunday. 

We are all glad to have Miss Behel with us again, 
after a long absence occasioned by serious illness. 

Miss Parker has taken up her abode once more in 
Ferry Hall and will resume her studies at the College. 

Miss Jessie Phillips, of the Northwestern Univer- 
sity, was the guest of Misses Wells and Somervillc 
Saturday and Sunday. 

For the past week the skating has been good and 
many of the young ladies have availed themselves of 
this opportunity to yield to the various attractions on 
and about "Farwell's Pond." 

On Friday last, Miss Porter was the recipient of one 
of those delightful large boxes from home. Happy 
were they, who were so fortunate as to room on her 
corridor, for in the evening, all were invited to share 
the many good things. 

Prof. Aeger has added greatly to the decoration of 
Dr. Seeley's table, by the purchase of a very unique 
individual castor. It is also of great economic value, 
because it facilitates the transportation of many articles, 
as the professor's "left hand man" can testify. 

Thursday evening a jolly party of young gentlemen 
and ladies, taking advantage of the grand sleighing 
and the glorious evening, had a very fine ride, after 
which they were invited to the home of Mr. Arthur 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Reid where an elaborate supper was awaiting them. 
They returned at about half-past ten amid the blowing' 
of horns and merry peals of laughter. 

The Seniors of L. F. TJ. were charmingly enter- 
tained on Monday p. m. at a tea given by Mrs. Seeley. 
The beautifully decorated parlors of the hostess were 
thrown open for the enjoyment of the guests. The 
library proved attractive in its new dress, and furnished 
many inviting nooks and corners. Dainty refreshments 
were served, and all pronounced "Mrs. Seeley's Senior 
Tea" one of the most successful and enjoyable social 
events of this school year. 

The Senior Club held its regular meeting Thursday 
evening, in the Zeta Epsilon hall. The program, under 
the direction of Misses Clark and Welton and Mr. 
Harris, was a decided success. The special feature was 
the impromptu debate by Messrs. Hunt and Williams. 
The subject, which we refrain from publishing, was 
very touching and one dear to the hearts of the mem- 
bers of this club. Mr. Curry kindly rendered several 
vocal numbers and the quartette favored us with one of 
their choice selections. 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Mr. Kretsinger's father was with him last Thurs- 
day and Friday. 

At this writing Mr. Harry Kretsinger is confined to 
his bed with a slight indisposition. 

A prominent member of the Senior class has been 
forced to return home, permanently, on account of his 
love for tobacco. 

One of the latest feds in the Cad is that practiced by 
a student from Indiana, namely, to borrow a dress suit 
from a professor. 

Julien Matthews has a great scheme of taking 
youthful passengers in his sleigh from town to Semin- 
ary and back for 15c a head. 

Judson Williams is inspecting his father's mines 
near St. Louis. The portly gentleman stated at his 
departure that a strike seemed imminent. 

While the snow stays it will be continually taken 
advantage of. Sleigh-loads of young people pass the 
buildings at different parts of the day and early portions 
of the night. 

Chapel-talks appear to be coming in vogue in the 
Academy and the students are pleased to seethe indica- 
tions. By means of such a custom and our double 
quartette the morning exercises are assuming attractive- 
ness. Prof. Smith has talked on these subjects lately. 
— "The Hawaiian Affair," "Astronomical Ideas," and 
"The American situation at Rio Janeiro." 

At the suggestion of Prof. Burnap the General 
History class devoted an hour of the half holiday last 



Wednesday to recitation. Prof. Burnap gave a talk-on 
the causes of the Peloponnesian War. and read a few 
extracts from an oration of Perecles upon that subject. 

Beginning Monday, Feb. 4th, the new semester 
plan was taken up. Instead of the usual one hour 
recitation which we have had, five recitations per week, 
forty-five minutes long, will be substituted. After 
reaching a certain point in General History that study 
will be dropped and for the other half semester Rhe- 
toric continued in its place. 

Reid Hall holds a collection of curiosities more ex- 
traordinary and interesting than many have ever seen. 
It is a collection of about twenty perfect models of 
Roman warfare accoutrements; Prof Palmer is not 
only owner but maker of this splendid group which is 
composed of the following objects: 

Tunis ambulatoria, - - - Movable tower 

Aries, .---.- Battering ram 
Onager, ------ 

Falx muralis, ------ Wall hook 

Fasces, ------ 

Gladiur, ------- Sword 

Pilurn, ------- Spear 

Scutum, ------- Shield 

Ara Sacrafica, - Sacraficial Altar 

Pons Sublicius, - - Being a representation of 

C;vsar's bridge across the Rhine 

Ballista, ----- Military engine 

The 12 foot model of Caesar's bridge over the Rhine 
was, without any aid whatever, finished in the incredibly- 
short space of a week. 

A highly interesting and somewhat inflamatory 
mass-meeting was held by the students last week Wed- 
nesday at 1 p. m. in the study-room, for the purpose of 
considering a holiday scheme that every year is in vain 
revived. A discussion was commenced on the advisa- 
bility of requesting from the faculty the entire Saturday 
as a holiday instead of two half holidays per week, but the 
idea called out so much euthusiasm that in the warmth 
of the animated discussion two factions were formed — 
a majority in favor of the proposal, a rather healthy 
minority opposing it. In one undistinguishable clatter 
of motions "to adjourn," "previous question," "call to 
order," "appeals from the chair," the majority at last 
managed to select a committee through which they 
might confer with the faculty. After they adjourned 
a brief meeting by the minority was held in the same 
room during which another committee also to confer 
with the faculty was appointed. Since the meeting 
Prof. Smith has announced that the innovation does not 
find favor with the faculty. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
Coll ege. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., Presiden. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 
Professor of the Principles and Practice 
of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 

NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 
and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



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TRIFLES 



The delegated PPegei? 

D. R. COOVER. 

photographer, 

70 STATE STREET, bay state building, 

FORMERLY OF HARRISON & COOVER. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 



STl JOFl\rrS P resent i n g M* s a d' will be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

$ $ The Model Clothing House, 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., 
The |V|odel" makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN, 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats if Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. « Verbum Sat Sapient 7." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



^HICAGO 
COLLEGE 
LAW 






THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



FACULTY 



HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. 



H( 



Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court 
of Illinois. 



ERRATUM. 

Through an oversight on the printer's part 

HON. H. M. SHEPA] the conclusion of the article "Field Day," 

Justice of Appellate Court, First Distric comprising Field Day Records, was omitted. 

Readers will please find it appended herewith: 
. . . AND OTHERS Field Day Records. 

Events. Records. 

SI'RING AMATUEK 

PALL, 90. FALL, 9 I, , g;j RMOKIMS, 

100 yard dash, n seconds. n seconds. 10 4 5 sec. a 4-5 sec. 

Mile run, 5 min. 28 sec. 5 min. 43 sec. 5 min. 25 sec. 4:17 4-5 sec. 

Standing broad jump, 8 ft. 9^ in. o ft. 7^2 in. 9 ft. 4 in. 10 ft o 1 * in. 

Running broad jump, ifi ft. S in. 17 ft. 4 in. 17 ft. 8 in. 23ft.6l-2in. 

Running high jump, 4 ft. o}£ in. 5 feet. 4 ft. 8 in. 6 ft. 4^ in. 

Baseball throw, 202 feet. 329 feet. 285 feet. 4oj feet. 

Putting the shot, 31 ft. 6 in. 31 ft. 1 l 2 in. 31 ft. 4 in. 47 feet. 

Only seven events are given because they are the 
only ones which were participated in at all field (hu- 
mects. Wm. B. Hunt, '174. 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the 
and continues ten months. 



The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 



ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

S- E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. 



Chicago. 



Vol. VII 




LAKE . FOREST . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies. 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co-educational. 

AT LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO, ILL. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 
leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides excepti6nal facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (i) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French, 
(4) German, (5) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (7) Political and Social Science 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 
For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



The Thoughtful Stud en t . . . 

LOOKS BACK of the present condition of national life in the United States, knowing that a right 
knowledge of the complex forces that have contributed to the growth of the nation is essential to any but 
a half-blind exercise of citizenship. 

The historian who can best aid him must be keen and sympathetic and just; he must be logical and 
thorough; he must show not ordy effects but causes; he must show the life of the nation. Such a history is 

Von Hoist's Constitutional and Political Histo r y of the U nited States. 

Few if any, works in the field of the American History are so frequently cited and so highly commended 
in the Universities of our land as this. A pamphlet descriptive of it will be sent you on request. 

A FEW CRITICAL OPINIONS. 



Its reflections are always astute and incisive. —Har/er's MontJiiy, 

Written for all time. — Neiv Orleans Picayune . 

Learned, ingenious, subtle, brilliant, dashing, and sometimes almost rollicking 
in his lively and glowing style. —Neic York Herald. 

The peculiarities of Von Hoist's historical clinics are first, a multitude of side 
lights which he throws on them from every quarter, and, second the remorseless 
pertinacity with which he follows up every nerve and muscle to its end. — Alex- 
ander Johnson. 

Masterly analysis of events. — The Nation. 



Omits no significant detail. — Dar-id Swing. 

In the front rank of American histories.—//, C . Lodge. 

Marked by comprehensiveness of statement, amplitude of detail, and clearness 
of exposition. — New York Tribune. 

We seem to feel from page to page, the onward march of destiny. — The 
I /(dependent. 

It is perfectly just and impartial in weighing argument and estimating charac- 
ter. Young America may well read and ponder this graphic narrative. — Harper's 
Weekly. 



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Another Indispensible Book is 

COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. Third Edition. 

It is incomparably the best edition. I shall commend it most heartily to the students in Cambridge Law School. — Hon. E. H. Bennett. 

Its contents in Four Books are: — 

Book 1. The Law of Persons. Being a comparison of English and American Constitutional Law. Domestic Relations. 
Corporations. 

Book II. The Law of Thing's. Being the same as to Real and Personal Property. Contracts. Agency. Partnership. Bail- 
ments. Commercial Law and Sales. 

Book III. Private Wrong's. Being the same as to Private Torts. Civil Pleading, Practice and Evidence. 

Book IV. Public Wrong's. Being the same as to Crimes. Criminal Pleading, Practice and Evidence. 
We do not hesitate to say this edition is the best extant. — Albany Law Journal. 

Two Volumes, §10 Net. 

CALLAGHAN & COMPANY, II4 Monroe St, Chicago, III. 




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The name 
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what it is, 
THE BEST BICYCLE BUILT FOR S125. 

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guarantee that t lie goods are the best. Complete Illustrated Catalogue ready. 
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Skating Is enjoyed by all. 



But to see the new College Stationery 

which we have just received is to buy it. 
Come around and look it over. 

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Envelopes to match. 

Pads containing ioo sheets, 25 cents. 
2s Envelopes, - 10 cents. 

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TOMASO 

MANDOLIN 
ORCHESTRA 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL 

21 Central Music Hall, 

CHICAGO. 



Dr. Geo. Doerbecker, 

Dentist 

GRADUATE OF PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE 
OF DENTAL SURGERY, PHILADELPHIA. 

Office: 134 Washington Street, 

OPPOSITE F RST NATIONAL BANK 

Waukegan - Illinois. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1S94 



No. 16 



COLLEGE ATHLETICS. 

our president's views ox this important subject. 

One of the serious dangers in our educational system 
is that we are apt to take a one-sided view of students. 
We are inclined to regard them merely as intellectual 
animals, to whom we are to supply proper mental food 
for their development. A broader view looks to the 
spiritual necessities, and would supply the means of 
moral development. But in these latter days we are 
coming more fully to recognize the composite nature of 
the material with which wc deal, and that it is our duty 
to deal with the whole structure. To develop all the 
powers of a man is the only proper response to his 
structure, and the complete system of education must 
regard physical and moral, as well as intellectual de- 
velopement. Upon such a plane, therefore, would I put 
college athletics, as a distinct and very important part of 
our educational work, as a department which demands 
as careful and expert oversight as any other department 
of the college. We are coming more and more to 
think that the physicial condition has very much to do 
with both intellectual and moral possibilities, and it is 
hard to understand why it is so often disregarded. Not 
many years ago the colleges endured or even frowned 
upon athletics, as something that "interfered with 
work," a view which has been very ^materially changed. 

The purpose of college athletics is a serious one, 
and is not simply to furnish an outlet for youthful 
spirits. It may be well to indicate the essential feature 
for the development of this important department. ■ 

The first need is a competent physical director, as 
specially trailed for his work as are the professors in 
other departments. It is just as absurd to turn students 
loose in the field to gather flowers and call it botanical 
culture, as to turn them loose on the play-ground or in 
the gymnasium and call it physical culture. Every 
student should be subjected to a physical examination 
and his work prescribed as rigidly as are'his other col- 
lege exercises. The developing of facilities should be 
made under the direction of the physical director, and 
the result would be something like symmetry rather 
than a haphazard collection of bric-a-brac. Of course 
a good gymnasium building is necessary, just as a 
laboratory, but it has little significance without a master 
in charge. It is needless to go into detail, for I know 
of no other scientific way of founding any department 
than to elect a professor and provide him with means 
for founding it. 

I suppose, however, that the phras "college 
athletics" suggests to the average reader games 
of football, or baseball, or other popular forms of 



athletic expression. These are but outgrowths that 
should come from a general physicial culture, and under 
proper control are unsurpassed in their cultivation of 
college spirit, in their supression of college pranks, 
in their encouragement of a vigorous, open-air life. 
The complaint is sometimes made that in "the height 
of the season" students think and talk of little else. A 
telling comparison was recently made by President 
VVarfield of La Fayette College in describing the stud- 
ent-life of French and German universities, where the 
subject-matter of thought and action would make us 
regard the roughest American football field with its 
mob of howling students as a scene of charming simp- 
plicity and helthful innocence. Of course, brutality is 
not manhood, but every form of athletic sport that is 
becoming to gentlemen should be encouraged among 
college students. The danger connected with the most 
popular forms of athletic contests is that they may- 
absorb all the interest and attention, and so practically 
destroy general athletics. This is hard to control when 
left solely to the impulses of students, and usually can 
only be effectively controlled by a competant physical 
director who has the general good in view. 

In closing, 1 wish to say that in these days of co- 
education no arrangement for physical culture is com- 
plete without suitable provision for the young ladies. 
In the very nature of things, the young men of a college 
will do much in a physicial way, even if no technical 
provision is made, but the young ladies are handicapped. 
No class needs more careful provision for physical 
culture than our girls, for -there arc none so much 
neglected in this particular, none to whom it would be 
of greater service. John M. Coulter. 



Field Day in Lake Forest. 

Lake Forest University rightly recognizes but few 
holidays, and it is fitting that the one holiday granted 
to the "physical man" should be devoted to track ath- 
letics, which allows of the greatest variety of athletes, 
thus making the day's amusement the most democratic 
possible. The time for the holiday is about three months 
distant, but if we are to improve on our former celebra- 
tions, of which there have been three or possibly four, 
it is high time that we began our considerations. 

The table given below is not to make a show of our 
good or poor work bnt as an object lesson. Lake For- 
rest needs several of those lessons if they will in any 
way show her that she is not actually progressive in 
every step, that she has yet a few rough edges which 
would be far better out of the way. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



One of our marks of backwardness lies in our under- 
valuation of track athletics. The truth of this state- 
ment ts shown by the records, the number of field-days, 
the lack of a running track and various pieces of appa- 
ratus necessary for good field work. And it may be 
acconnted for in one or two ways, complimentary or 
uncomplimentary to ourselves. We may account for 
the statement iu the first way by saying that in track 
athletics the incentives are selfish, the strife being 
more between individuals than colleges. We being 
few in numbers, studiously inclined, and generous 
to a fault, put all of our energies on one part of our 
athletics, foot-ball, where individualism is most lost 
sight of and the college or universit}' idea has the 
ascendency. In the second way — uncomplimentary to 
ourselves — we will account for our undervaluation of 
track athletics, First, by our ignorance of them in re- 
gard to training; second, by our belief, founded on a 
wrong basis, that track athletics are only for track ath- 
letes, i. e., those who have taken part in contests, and 
third, by reason of the lack of that excitement which is 
found in a game played by more than one or two. 

All cannot play foot-ball, a good many more are not 
base-ball players, gymnasium work is irksome and not 
so invigorating also. Hence we claim for track ath- 
letics a place, equal to that held by foot-ball and base- 
ball, in the minds and hearts of students, alumni, facul- 
ty, trustees and friends of the University. And to this 
end we would urge immediate and careful steps toward 
a levelling of the athletic field and the addition of a 
cinder running track about it. Let us hope that our 
late determination to make our athletics pay and not to 
have to beg support from friends is an advance which 
will not hinder us from having a better equipped ath- 
letic field, which means ultimately, better field days. 



ATHLETICS. 

There are cranks everywhere, even Massachusetts 
has them. Last week a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature introduced a bill prohibiting the charging 
of admission for football games and making it a criminal 
offence for anyone to play when admission is charged. 

We have learned that the long needed lockers are 
to be a reality in the near future. We hope this is true, 
but judging from the expedition used in getting the rest 
of the things which were promised, and which have not 
come, we are afraid it will be spring before we get the 
lockers. 

The National Baseball League has had a committee at 
work on the rides for the past week. The only change 
to amount to anything is the restrictions put upon the 
bunt. If the suggestions of the committee are adopted 
the bunt will be almost as good as legislated out of ex- 
istance. Another rule suggested governs the behavior 
of players on the field and gives the umpire power to 
fine or have removed any player acting indecently or 
using profane language. 



Every time one watches a game of handball in the 
the gymnasium he is impressed with the amount of 
wrangling that is done over questions of rules. This is 
very disagreeable, and the players ought to get together 
and form rules or adopt one of the several codes used 
in different large courts. 

Casper Whitney, whose articles 'in Harper's Weekly 
are read by nearly every college man, has gone to En- 
gland to make a thorough study of English amateur 
sport. The last article in Harper's was written by 
Walter Camp and gave some of his views upon foot- 
ball, besides a brief history of its development. 

After a good deal of wrangling with the large col- 
leges, the University Athletic Association of N. Y". has 
finally succeeded in getting their consent to name a 
committee for the revision of football rules. The 
Athletic Committee of the Association has named the 
committee of revision as follows: — Walter Camp, Yale; 
Brooks, Harvard; Moffat, Prinseton; Dashiel, Lehigh, 
and one not settled yet from Pennsylvania. It is not 
likely that any radical changes will be made in the 
game, but the momentum plays will probably be done 
away with, and the number of downs allowed a team 
for gaining ground in will very likely be lessened. 
Several suggestions in regard to changing rules govern- 
ing kicking have been made, bur it is doubtful if they 
will be adopted. It would, however, not be surprising 
if some changes should be made in the rules governing 
scoring. But whatever is done will undoubtedly be for 
the best, as all the men on the committee have made a 
study of the game for years and thoroughly under- 
stand it. 



THE UNIVERSITY PIN. 




The above design for a University pin seems to be 
the most generally acceptable of the three presented in 
The Stentor of January 30. It will certainly look 
very neat in red and black enamel. The price of such 
a pin in silver will be from 35 to 50 cents. 

Mr. J. Edwards Smith, ex '90, of Minneapolis 
writes us that "either design would be a puzzle to most 
any outsider to discover the identity of one's Alma 
Mater." He suggests that the words "Lake Forrest" 
would be better than the initials. 

The pins will be manufactured and placed on sale at 
the College Book Store as soon as the design is definite- 
ly settled. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



BIBLE INSTITUTE. 

There will be given soon in the Presbyterian Church 
of Lake Forest, under the auspices of the University, a 
series of addresses on the Bible. We give below a 
statement of the subjects and speakers, with the dates. 
These addresses are for the purpose of stimulating and 
directing Biblical study, and giving, so far as possible 
the latest accredited results of scholarship. The course 
is free and open to 'all, and it is hoped that both students 
and towns-people will avail themselves of the privilege 
here offered. The subjects are of great present inter- 
est and the speakers selected are men of reputation for 
eloquence and literaiy attainments. 

Friday evening February 23d, "Methods of Higher 
Criticism as illustrated in the Book of Genesis," — Rev, 
E. C. Bissell, D. D., of McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Saturday morning, February 24, "The Bible and 
Nature," — President Coulter. 

Saturday evening, February 24, "The Bible and 
Society,"— Rev. N. D. Hillis, D. D., Evanston. 

Sunday Morning, February 25, "The Bibe and 
History," — Rev. Joseph T. Duryea, D. D., Omaha, 
Neb. 

Sunday evening, February 25, "The Bible a super- 
natural Revelation not only to man hut tlirongli man. 
— Rev. Thos. E. Hall, Chicago. 



LIBRARY FINDING LISTS. 
The finding lists are now ready at the treasurer's 
office. These lists show what books are in the library, 
and where they are found. At the end of each are iS 
blank pages to be used for keeping the list down to 
date by means of printed accession slips, which will be 
supplied free at the library. When these slips are 
ready, notice will be posted. I would suggest that the 
list owner head the pages as follows: — Page 1, General; 
page 2, English Language and Literary Criticism ; 
page 3, English Poetry and Drama; page 4, English 
Prose; page 5, French and German; page 6, Greek 
and Latin; page 7, Minor Languages and Fine Arts; 
page S, Social Science; page 9, Ancient History; page 
10, Modern Foreign History; page 11, American 
History; page 12, Religion ; page 13, Philosophy ; page 
14, Mental Science; page 15, Zoology, Botany and 
Geology; page 16, Physics and Chemisty ; page 17, 
Astronomy and Mathematics; page iS, Biography and 
Miscellaneous. Three special reference catalogues will 
shortly be fixed in the library, but one who uses books 
much will find it to his advantage to have a finding: list 
of his own, as he then can tell at his room what books 
are in the library, and can use his list at the shelves. 
The lists are sold at forty cents each, which is much be- 
low cost. 

H. M. Stanley, Librarian. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Mr. Fauntleroy's new residence was opened Mon- 
day night with a dance, given hy Mrs. Fountleroy for 
Miss Torrey. 

The Rev. Mr. Hale, of Hyde Park, preached Sun- 
day morning and evening, Dr. McClure filling Mr. 
Hall's pulpit at Hyde Park. 

The Art Institute unanimously reelected the follow- 
ing officers for the coining year: — 

President, - Prof. M. Bross Thomas 

Vice-President, - Mr. E. F. Chapin 

Secretary, - - Prof. McNeill 

Treasurer, - Mr. J. L. Moss 

The Art Institute met at the house of Mr. Hinckley 
Thursday evening. The program opened with sing- 
ing by a ladies' trio, Mrs. Gorton and two others. The 
Rev. Dr. Jenkin Lloyd Jones lectured on "The Cause 
of the Toiler as Exhibited in the Ait Galleries at the 
World's Fair." The lecture was followed with another 
song by the trio. 

The attention of the town's people is called to the 
fact that the University Athletic Association has not 
called on them for subscriptions for the support of 
athletics at all this year. It is accordingly hoped that 
they will be very liberal in their support of the enter- 
tainment on Friday evening, which is for the benefit 
of University athletics. 

In times of extremely cold weather most of the 
water-users of Lake Forest keep the water running all 
night to prevent it freezing. As a result more water 
was pumped per day during these cold spells than on 
any of the dryestdaysof last summer. At first thought 
it would seem that anyone has a right to save himself 
the annoyance and expense of bursted pipes; that he 
cannot be blamed for using as much water as he wants 
when he is willing to pay for all he uses. There is, 
moreover, no provision of paving for extra water. But 
there is, however, a phrase of the case as to which the 
water company has not sufficiently informed the users 
of their water, and probably only a few know that 
there is a means of turning off "the water. Tust outside 
of each house, or, in some cases, inside, where the pipe 
from the street enters, is a crank connected with a valve 
several feet under ground. By turning this crank at 
night the water is turned off for the whole house, and 
at the same time is securely protected underground. 
All citizens are requested to notice and make use of this 
convenience. 



The Northzvestern publishes this week a cut of the 
LTniversity Glee Club. The)' have secured this year 
the leadership of Prof. W. H. Knapp of the Conser- 
vatory of Music. They have already given several 
successful concerts and have quite a number of dates 
arranged for the near future. 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, "94, 
David Fales, Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, ( 
A. O. Jackson, '96, 1 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 



6 THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. T /HAT has become of the Oratorical Asso- 

W ciation? The president did not return 
(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 
to school this year, but the other officers are 

in College and they should call a meeting to 

elect his successor, and also to determine the 

' .. date of the local contest. Lake Forest has 

Editor 

Assistant Editor and Tou-n Topics established her reputation by winning first and 
Locals second places in the state, and first in the inter- 
Alumni state contests, and must not fall behind this 
year. 

* * 

SLOWLY do the old customs disappear. The 
college faculty has lately voted to dis- 
pense with all but two of the graduating 
orations, thus disposing of a time honor- 
ed practice. The old fashioned Com- 
mencement, with its flowers and frills, is 
doubtless very pretty, but is less useful 
than ornamental. GOne reason for its disap- 
pearance probably is that there is now less of 
the idea that a student has "finished" when he 
graduates. The old ceremonies conveyed the 
impression that the graduating student had 
learned all there was to be learned from books 
and apparatus, consequently his entrance into 
"the world" should be distinctly signalized. In 
these days the increasing number of post grad- 
uate students, even if there were no other 
reason, would tend to dispel that illusion. In- 
stead of the new fledged "Bachelor" being 
told that in the field of learning there is for 
him nefilus tiltra, he sees that the true idea is 
phis ultra — "everything beyond." 



D. H. Jackson, '96, 




- 


Athletics 


Chas. Thom, '9.3, 




- 


Exchanges 


Miss Eudora Smith, 


'94, 


- 


Aletheian 


Miss F. Somerville, 
Miss Mabel Palmer, 


i 

f 


- 


Ferry Hall 


S. E. Gruenstein, )_ 
B. S. Cutler, ) 




- 


Academy 


A. r Bourns. '94, 




- 


Business Manager 


C. B. Moore, '95, 




- 


Advertising 






TERMS. 




Per Year, in advance, 


$1.50 


Single Copies, 




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Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, III., as second-class matter. 

ATTENTION is called to the announce- 
ment of the course of lectures in the 
"Bible Institute," which begins next week. 
The lecturers promise to be highly profitable 
and interesting, and all should avail themselves 
of the privilege of listening to the excellent 
speakers who will take part. 

* 
* * 

THE s£gis has just published a 36-page 
number, containing a full account of the 
recent "joint debate" at the University of Wis- 
consin, giving the remarks of each of the six 
speakers in full, and in addition a complete 
list of the works used and found serviceable 
by the debaters. The question discussed was with life at Yale. He writes an interesting 
that of the government ownership and opera- article, and is evidently fairly well posted on 
tion of railroads. The manner of treatment bcth sides of the subject. We do not know 
shows the scientific and original investigation with what particular western colleges he is 
which it is possible for students to do. If we familar, but some of his conceptions of them 
mistake not the discussion will form a distinct are a little behind the times, especially when 
addition to economic literature. applied to the schools in Chicago or vicinity. 



* 
* * 



EAST AND WEST CONTRASTED. 
RECENT writer in the Yale Courant 
gives his impressions of student life in 
the colleges of the middle West, as contrasted 



A 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The gentleman first remarks that western 
colleges suffer from the fact thatmany promising 
young men are drawn into eastern institutions. 
Then, too, the majority of their students show 
a lack of thorough preparation. This is due 
to the inferiority of the high schools and to in- 
sufficiency of strong preparatery schools. As 
a result it is alleged that the work of western 
students is not as thorough as that of the best 
class of Yale men. Lessons are studied as 
carefully, but there is less consultation of out- 
side anthorities and less of a range of reading 
beyond the text-book. Nor have students 
been trained to intense application by their 
earlier studies. It might also have been said 
that the student's auxilliary reading is too 
often limited by the meagreness of library 
facilities. 

In regard to comparative deportment it is 
asserted that as a rule western students are 
more noisy, but rather le'ss given to reprehen- 
sible amusements than eastern collegians. 
The prominence of the literary societies in 
western schools is in characteristic contrast to 
Yale. Generally speaking, the local societies 
do vigorous work, and rivalry between them 
is usually vigorous also. Western college 
oratory is characterized as less scholarly, but 
often excelling in earnestness and force 
that of Yale. College periodicls are mostly 
monthly or semi-monthly. The average stand- 
ard, it must'be admitted, is not very high, the 
contents often being labored essays and un- 
dignified personals. 

Athletics in western colleges are discussed 
at some length. Their chief deficiency is shown 
to be lack of money and training. "A few men 
of some talent who will not work, and a few 
others who will train as well as they know how 
but who have only moderate ability, form the 
ordinary western nine or eleven." The lack 
of descipline is amusing to a Yale man. The 
reason is that a place on a team is not valued 
as it is in the east, because the accompanying 
prestige is not nearly as great. "The indolence 
of the players and the indifference of the gen- 
eral public act and react upon each other." 
But in these respects our critic sees a rapid 
advance, and the standard is rising with, to 
him, "startling rapidity." There is an abund- 
ance of muscle and energy which only needs 
proper training to bring out. 

In conclusion it is affirmed that college life 
in the West isless highly organized, less mature, 
and exhibits less perfection in attaining the 
result aimed at. But we of the wooly West 
know that we have the "essentials," and the 
rest will come with time — and a not very dis- 
tant time either. 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Have you seen the new Phi Kappa Sigma pins? 

The Hare ami Hounds Club took a run last Satur- 
day afternoon. 

Prof. Stevens was confined to his house all of last 
week as a result of vaccination. 

Cragin and Morrison came down from Waukegan 
and spent a shut time in Lake Forest one day last 
week. 

Mr. Black had to re-introduce himself on Monday 
morning owing to the fact that he had removed his 
"Pefferite" whiskers. 

Library " finding lists" maybe had upon applica- 
tion at the Treasurer's office — provided you find 40 cents 
to accompany your application. 

Dr. Coulter delivered an address on Tuesday last 
before a convention of the Y. M. C. A., of Chicago, 
1111 the subject of "True Manhood." 

The college girls do not aspire to forming a Y. 
J/. C. A., as the printer made us say last week; we shall 
be perfectly satisfied with a good Y. W. C. A. 

President Coulter visited Indianapolis on Friday and 
spent Saturday in Danville, 111. At the latter place he 
addressed the teachers and High School students, and 
also delivered a lecture to a general audience. He re- 
ports a strong Lake Forest sentiment at Danville. 

Invitations from the Ferry Hall seniors have been 
received by the fortunate ones to a Valentine party, 
worded like this: — "Seniors of '94, one and all, desire 
your presence at Ferry Hall Tuesday evening, the 
thirteenth ; 'twill lie to exchange valentines, you see." 

The language of the third floor, to the every-day 
person, is almost unir.tellegible, about the only words 
we hear now are such expressions as "catch him on the 
point," "punch his smeller," "get on to the claret, first 
blood," etc. We expect a summons for the militia 
shortly. 

It is an unexplained phenomenon why all the 
monthly magazines appear on the city news-stands from 
one to two weeks before they are seen on the reading 
room tables. For example, the February Century had 
not reached the reading room up to Monday morning, 
the [2th. Something must be wrong with the trans- 
portation department. 

The night watchers of Friday, Feb. 9th, witnessed 
sceenes of revelry among the College girls. The 
Juniors and Freshmen held class feasts, while the 
Seniors and Sophs united forces to demolish their re- 
past. As usual, the Freshmen had more style and form 
and more variety in the viands, but the Senior- Soph 
party certainly hail the best intellectual ( ?) feast, con- 
sisting of music, recitations, and impromptu addresses. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The chess club has as last organized, with C. G. 
Smith as president, and E. U. Graff, secretary. The 
membership already numbers fourteen, and is likely to 
be soon increased. An invitation has been received by 
the secretary of the club from the Chicago Chess and 
Checker Club, asking our members to play them a 
series of games. 

Auston was rudely awakened one night last week, 
and on attempting to rise found himself imbedded in a 
plaster cast. The explanation was found in the fact 
that, according to the unfortunate victim's statements, 
about three tons of his bedroom ceiling, attracted either 
by the force of gravitation or by Mr. Ruston, had be- 
come detached and started downward. 

Mr. D. W. Lyon, the traveling secrteary of the 
Student Volunteer movement, addressed the students in 
Ferry Hall chapel last Tuesday evening on the Annual 
Convention of the Volunteers at Detroit. Detroit has 
promised to entertain a thousand delegates. Lake Forest 
is allowed five delegates, of which there will probably 
be one from the Academy Association, two from the 
Ferry Hall and two from the College. 

Patriotism received a decided boom at the hands of 
President Coulter and the Faculty yesterday morning, 
when they granted the petition of the College students 
for a holiday in commemoration of Illinois' greatest 
son, Abraham Lincoln. President Coulter made some 
very fitting remarks on patriotism and read from a re- 
cent article in the Century on Lincoln's place in history. 

Dr. Coulter gave the students a few words of advice 
and instruction in regard to the semester system in col- 
leges, at chapel, Feb. 5. He said that as a rule students 
should continue in the second semester the subject pur- 
sued in the first, as the first semester's work is but an 
introduction to the subject to which the second sem- 
ester's work adds some practical knowledge of the sub- 
ject. He said the day was fast approaching when 
students must choose studies for the year instead of for 
the semester. 

The Aletheian Society held an interesting meeting 
Friday evening, the paper entitled "Who," written by 
Miss Phelps, and the impromptu address upon "My 
First Impressions of College," by Miss McLean, cal- 
ling forth much merriment. The debate was well sus- 
tained by the Misses Pearce and Fitz-Randolph. The 
music consisted of an instrumental solo bv Miss Parker 
and a vocal solo by Miss Keener. Miss Phelps had 
charge of the parliamentary law exercise, the subject 
discussed being motions and amendments and how to 
defer action upon them. 

Every professor has his own idea of study and its 
utility, and most of them agree, if the truth were known, 
but each looks at it out of his own department and sees 
it just a little different from his neighbor. If he does 
not see a difference, he at least sees another side of it 



more plainly. Prof. Stuart advocates disciplina, Prof. 
Locy personal investigation, and then comes Prof. 
Jack, who advocates honest doubt. The all have the 
same final cause, truth, yet students are too apt to think 
that they are in conflict. Look more carefully and be 
not too ready to find discrepancy. 

After the Y. M. C. A. reception Saturday night, the 
3rd inst., the College gairls repaired to the Aletheian 
Hall, where a very dainty and pretty marshmallow 
toast was given by Miss Keener in honor of Miss 
Wetherhold's birthday. Needless to say, we are glad 
that Miss Jessie had a birthday and there were many 
wishes for her happy future not only in the toasts and 
clinking of glasses, but in the ' silent wishes ' offered, as 
with the lighted tapers held high in hand, we formed 
the 'wishing circle ' and marched down the stairs and 
through the long corridors to our couches of repose, 
with the flickering candles as our only light through 
the midnight blackness. 

Prof. Jack's chapel talk of last Wednesday morning 
was unique and striking, and especially fitting when 
considered in connection with the one given by Prof. 
Stevens. Instead of taking a subject he chose a text 
from Tennyson's "In Memoriam," 

"There lives more faith in honest doubt, 
"Believe me, than in half the creeds." 
He held that a doubter is often a true believer, that 
doubt is not wrong but right, and that honest doubt is 
a necessity to him who would live a higher life. 
Further, that there is no line of truth which is not in 
a progressive stage. Our ideas of God have changed 
more in the last century than our ideas of the world, 
and the one thing which keeps us from finding the truth 
more readily is religious fervor. 

The Z. E. Society program of last Friday evening 
was as follows: Debate: " Resolved, that the impeach- 
ment of President Cleveland for his action in the Ha- 
waian affair would be justifiable." The speakers on 
the affirmative were D. I. Jones and J. M. Vance; on 
the negative, A. F. Waldo and J. N. Adams. The 
judges reported two for the affirmative and one for the 
negative. J. J. Price gave a recitation, W. D. Gibson 
and W. T. Angus gave a society paper, the "Jocunda 
Aura." Messrs. Harris and C. Thorn discussed the in- 
fluence of the Parliament of Religions, pro and con, on 
foreign mission work; and H. L. Bird finished the pro- 
gram by conducting a " question box " on a variety of 
topics ranging from eating clubs to the North Pole. 

The following program was rendered at the Athen- 
ian meeting on Friday evening: A declamation by 
Mr. Vincent, entitled " The Light-house." The next 
number, the feature of the evening, was a society paper 
edited by Messrs. Coulter, Carver, and Reid, and read 
by Mr. Coulter. Mr. Coulter's poetical gems made a 
decided hit. " Is the entire unanimity of the jury in 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 9 

their verdict a feature of the jury system which should FERRY HALL. 

be retained?" was the question for a discussion, sup- Miss Mamie Birchcll spent the latter part of last 

ported on the affirmative by D. H. Jackson and on the week at her home jn the dty# 

negative by I. H. Tones. The last number, the debate, „ . . , , . , . .,,. . „ . . 

a J J J . . Grace VVelton visited friends in Chicago r rid ay and 

" Resolved, that the establishment of an income tax in _ , 

Saturday, 
the United States is advisable," resulted in a spirited dis- 

, , , „ , ,, q- i Miss Charlotte Peck, Chicago, was the guest of Miss 

cussion between Mr. Goodman on the affirmative and ° ' ° 

w n ^i ..• ti i • - c .i Bouton over Sunday. 

Mr. Ruston on the negative. 1 he decision ot the ' 

judges was for the affirmative. Cards have becn received announcing the marriage 

of Miss Mary Cabot, a Ferry Hall student in \jz. 

ATHLETIC ENTERTAINMENT MlS " H- A ' Vennema > of Menominee, Mich., was 

We print below the program of the entertainment the guest of her sister, Miss Parmenter, over Sunday, 

to he given next Friday evening in the Art Building: Last Saturday evening Misses Pate, Stoddard anil 

PART I. Dillin took great pleasure in reciting for the " Boys' 

March—" High School Cadets " Sousa Clun," which meets every week in the old hotel. 

L. F. U. Banjo Club. XT ., 

„ , . ,-,, ., Both Prof. Aeger and Mrs. Hester contributed to 

Too late to Classify b 

George Willie Wright and Willie Eddie Danforth. the enjoyment of the chapel exercises last week, bv 

Selection— "The Fencing-Master" R. DeKoven their pretty and entertaining musical numbers. 

Messrs. North, Smith and Double Quartet. 

, Of late the tones of the rising bell have been more 

Selection = 

Mr. G. W. Wright. doleful than ever before. Would you know the reason 

March — " Ivanhoe " Wenger why? Because it, like the "Old Libert}' Bell," is 

Mandolins and Guitars. . , 

cracked. 
Selection A. T. Random 

L. F. U. Glee Club. Miss Ward, formerly a student and teacher of Ferry 

PART II. Hall, later a missionary to China, spoke to the young 

First presentation hereof the charming comedietta in one net, adies of the Missionary Society Sunday evening on the 

entitled subject " China." 

WHICH IS WHICH? It has been decided to have what is called a French 

By S. Tiieyre Smith. - m, . ,-.., ■ i • 1 -n at 

evening. 1 his little social sircle will meet every JNlon- 

Cast of Characters: - day evening, chiefly for the purpose of developing its 

Robert Capper, a young artist much in debt, Mr. Harv Goodman conversational nowers 

Mr. Gargle, his uncle Mr. P. E. North ' l 

Paddles, an oil and color man Mr. D. D. Lewis The girls of the first and second corridors were fav- 

Annie Pestle, an heiress Miss Gertrude Pate 1 -.i • n 1 • c > 

Bertha Bingham, her penniless friend Miss Lita Stoddard ored wlth invitations to a ve.y swell spread given Sat- 

Mrs. Mills, Capper's old servant Miss Nellie R. 1 >i 1 1 in u relay evening, by the Misses Blair, in honor of Miss 

Scene — An Artist's Studio. « , . , , • . , , 

Annas — th birthday. 

COMMUNICATION The warning bell, which is rung every Satarday 

LLr , , , I,. , , j .1 . night at ten minutes of nine, is inadequate to fulfill its 

"Great wits to madness surely are allied. And thin s . 

.... , ., ■ , , ,. -j „ • , . r mission, and hereafter, if not heeded, the young ladies 

partitions do their bounds divide, is a couplet from J ° 

T ^. , £ ,■ , ,, t-,, ., • will not be allowed to receive callers. 
JDryden of exceptional worth. 1 here are some things 

done about every college hall which are most surely Friday evening the young ladies had their long 

done by one of the two classes intimated, great wits or looked-for dance. A program of fourteen numbers 

madmen. The treatment of papers and periodicals in proved none too long, and for two hours the gymnasium 

the reading room is a striking instance. As all know, was the scene of a S a > r and brilliant company. The 

most of our periodicals are either kept by the Univer- music, consisting of violin and harp, was furnished by 

sity and are bound in volumes for the library or are sold parties from the city, and made the hop a grand success. 

forthe support of the reading room to private individuals. Mr. Howard, the phrenologist, who lectured in the 

No periodical is exempt from destructive usage. In chapel Saturday P. M., disclosed some very interesting 

consequence of this as each year comes round we find facts about numerous bumps on the head. He thinks 

a gradual decrease in the amount of revenue from the he has found a large field for labor, and when he returns 

sale of these periodicals. Hence we come to the con- next week, desires that all " interesting characters " 

elusion that some one or more of the reading room pat- make him a private call. 

rons are suicidal of their own best financial and mental One evening last week the ladies on the first corridor 

interests. Now it may be the part of great wits to dis- received the following invitation:— 

respect the rights of other people, but if it is they "to At nine o'clock on Thursday night. 

madness surely are allied" and it is clearly the part of J° u ' r ? as kedto me u et Mis u s Ph «'P s in white, 

■* - i s,he wishes you to be a ghost, 

other people to defend themselves against the mad. To come toher marsh mallow toast. 



IO 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Wednesday evening Miss Pate, no longer "sweet 
sixteen," did honor to her birthday by entertaining the 
first floor corridor from nine to ten. A very elaborate 
spread was the order of the evening, after which the 
guests departed, wishing the hostess many happy returns 
of the day, and secretly longing that Miss Gertrude 
might have a nightly birthday celebration. 

In chapel Sunday morning Dr. Seeley gave a very 
interesting problem to the girls, viz., that if the greater 
per cent of the young ladies can arise at 6:30 six days 
out of the week, how many should be able to arise at 
seven o'clock on the seventh day? " He went on to say 
that if it is easier to arise at 6:30, then let us do the 
easier thing and have the rising bell peal forth at that 
hour on Sunday A. M. 

The chapel exercises were conducted by Prof. 
Thomas on Wednesday morning. After the usual de- 
votional services, he laid before the students a plan for 
Bible instruction, to be effected by a course of lectures. 
These talks to be given in the near future by well- 
known men, on the "Relation of the Bible to different 
phases of the human life." None of us know too much 
about the Bible, and all look forward to these meetings, 
which we will gladly support both by our presence 
and by financial aid. 

At the appointed hour the reception room of the 
hostess presented a very ghostly aspect, as fourteen 
figures clad in white seated themselves at the prettily 
arranged anil daintly decorated tables, to while away 
two short hours toasting marshmallows, by wee candles, 
and relating ghost stories. All vied with one another 
in trying to tell the biggest tale. An intellectual feast, 
"A penny for your thoughts," was a pleasurable feature 
of the evening. Each guest carried away numerous 
souvenirs, as they always do, to helpjswell the memory 
books. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

George Wells visited his brother Ed on Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Valentine's day will be appropriately celebrated in 
the Academy on Wednesday. 

Reinhart has gone home to recover from his sick- 
ness. We hope to see him back soon. 

Prof. Smith left town last week to visit his mother 
at Princeton, 111. He received word that she was ill. 
We sincerely hope that her illness may not prove very 
serious. 

Again our musical tastes were regaled with a per- 
formance bv the Academy Glee Club. Saturday morn- 
ing two selections were sung by that body. Master 
John Fales will hereafter sing the soprano parts. Prof. 
Dudley says he has a fine voice. 

The preliminary contest in debate was held by the 
Tri Kappa society last Wednesday. The two con 
testants spoke on the negative side of the following 
question: "Resolved, that the press influence public 



opinion more than the public opinion does the press.' 
The judges gave first place to Mr. Stoops and second 
to Mr. Loughlin. 

Prof. Thomas of the College conducted chapel ex- 
ercises for us Tuesday morning. He announced to the 
students a series of lectures that had been procured by 
the University, and named each of the six lectures, to- 
gether with the subjects of their respective discourses. 
The Academy was cordially invited to attend the lec- 
tures and asked to help along its plan financially. It 
should and will respond. 

On Saturday noon a mass meeting of the students 
was called in the study-room. They proposed to sue 
for a holiday on Monday in honor of Lincoln's birth- 
da}'. After a few moments' wrangling a committee of 
five was delegated to solicit the faculty. Later it was 
announced by Prof. Burnap that owing to the proximity 
of another holiday in honor of Washington's birthday 
the request of the students cou'd not be granted. 

The Academy muse, under the inspiration of Val- 
entine's Day, is soaring high, as witness the following: 

Chaste Diana, O glorious moon, 

Thy beams touch the strings of the lover's lyre. 

It breathes to his love a sweet low tune. 

Are the murmuring night-winds a vast grand choir? 

Her golden hair hanging o'er balcony rail, 

Love-speaking eyes gaze to love-speaking eyes; 

Lips swear eternal love by thy beams pale. 

Sigh answers sigh as each throbbing word dies. 



EXCHANGES. 

Military drill has proved a failure at Stanford 
University. 

The students at Champaign are varying the mono- 
tony of college life by some exceedingly lively class 
fights. 

Johnny — "Papa, 1 looked through the keyhole last 
night while sis and her beau were there." 

Papa — "What did you find out, my boy?" 

Johnny—" The lamp."— Ex. 

Prof. Snow of the University of Wisconsin has 
lately disproved the theory that 100 degrees below zero 
Centrigrade destroys the magnetism of steel magnets. 
By pouring ether over solid carbonic acid he produced a 
temperature of 1 10 degrees below zero and found that 
the coefficient of magnetism remains the same or slight- 
ly increases if there is any change. 



THINK OF IT 

4--POS-TIV-LY=12 

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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EPHRAIM INGALS, A. M., M. D., Ph.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica 

and Medical Jurisprudence. 

DANIEL T. NELSON, A. M., M.D., 
Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocologv. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Yenereal Diseases. 



NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis. 

ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery^ 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. O. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 

Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 

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STI JOFINJTS Presenting this ad, will be allowed Ten Per Cent discount at 

^ The Model Clothing House, 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., 
The |V|oder' makes a specialty of WAUKEGAN. 

Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats tP Furnishing Goods. 

And on account having less than one-twentieth .part of the expense of any Chicago House, sell same quality of 
goods much cheaper. « Verbum Sat Safienii." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




OF 



HICAGO 

COLLEGE 

LAW 



THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 



faculty: 

HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court Late Justice of Appellate Court, 

of Illinois. First District of Illinois. 

HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS . . . 



The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE fu ir » rn 

S. E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. VynlUAUVJ. 



( 



February 20,^894. 
> 1 < 



Xo. \-j 




LAKE . FOREST 
UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 



1. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys. 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co-educational. 

AT LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



AS FOLLOWS: 
4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



5. CHICAGO COLCEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW. 

AT CHICAGO, ILL. 
ffers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY 01 

leading colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years 
of college work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of 
undergraduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth 
is given to a major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work 
are offered in each of the following departments: (1) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) French, 
(4) German, (5.) English, (6) Biblical Literature, (71 Political and Social Science 
including History, (8) Philosophy, (9) Mathematics, (10) Astronomy, (11) Chem- 
istry, (12) Physics, (13) Zoology, (14) Botany, (15) Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of 
Medicine, Dental Surgery, and Law. 
For circulars of information concerning any department of the L niversity, address 

JOHN M. COULTER, President Lake Forest University, 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



The Thoughtful^tudent 



LOOKS BACK of the present condition of national life in the United States, knowing that a right 
knowledge of the complex forces that have contributed to the growth of the nation is essential to any but 
a half-blind exercise of citizenship. 

The historian who can best aid him must be keen and sympathetic and just; he must be logical and 
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Von Hoist ' s Constitutional and Politi cal History of the U nited States. 

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in the Universities of our land as this. A pamphlet descriptive of it will be sent you on request. 

A FEW CRITICAL OPINIONS. 



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The peculiarities of Von Hoist's historical clinics are first, a multitude of side 
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pertinacity with which he follows up every nerve and muscle to its end. — Alex- 
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Masterly analysis of events. — The Nation. 



Omits no significant detail. — David Swing. 

In the front rank of American histories.—//. C . Lodge. 

Marked by comprehensiveness of statement, amplitude of detail, and clearness 
of exposition. — New York Tribune. 

We seem to feel from page to page, the onward march of destiny- — The 
Independent . 

It is perfectly just and impartial in weighing argument and estimating charac- 
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Office: 134 Washington Street, 

opposite first national bank 

Waukegan - Illinois. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII. 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 



STUDENT EXPERIENCES IN BERLIN. 

Probably to some of the readers of The Stentor 
anything concerning the experience of an American 
student in Berlin will be but an old story, but perhaps 
to others what we have seen through another's eyes will 
be interesting. 

The student's first thought upon arriving in Ger- 
many is of course to learn the language. He must hire 
a teacher and if possible find some one who is willing 
to converse with him for the sake of the English he may 
acquire. Such conversation must be amusing to both 
parties. Some ludicrous combinations of English words 
sometimes occur as in the following note written by a 
young German to excuse himself from an engagement 
which hgd been made for a certain Wednesday. He 
wished to he excused because it was a fast day in the 
Lutheran Church. The word "though" in the note 
means "thought" and it is presumed by the "miner" he 
meant his family, but it is not certain. The note was 
directed to a minister and red as follows: — 

"Your Reverence 

Pray your pardon, — 

I have did it though: Wednesday is 
holiday whom I like to dedicate the miner. I beg you 
around, me to not expect this evening. I shall see you 
again soon Thursday eight o'clock Wilhems St. 34. 
Most respectful," 

The University at Berlin opens about the middle of 
October. On the opening days the student presents 
himself to the proper committee, which receives his 
credentials, asks numerous questions, and presents him 
with a card which is his pass, and one important factor 
in his student life. A diploma from an American school 
does not amount to anything. You are admitted be- 
cause you are a foreigner. 

After a man matriculates he must pay a certain 
number of lectures and then get the professor under 
whom he is studying to sign his name in a book which 
has been given him. This signifies that the student has 
heen present at the beginning of the course. As the 
end of semester the book is brought again and signed 
which signifies that the student has been present at the 
close of the semester. This is all that is required. 
The student can attend when he wishes and stay away 
when he wishes. Examinations occur at the end of 
the course only, while a candidate for a doctorate de- 
gree must pass an examination in everything at one 
time. 

One thing in connection with the lecturer, which is 
doubtless very gratifying to the professor, and incident- 



ally very different from our average lecture here, is the 
fact that the lecture rooms are models of quietness 
during the lecture. Commencing at a quarter-past 
the hour the lecture lasts forty-five minutes. All stu- 
dents are in their places at a quarter-past and waiting 
for the professor. He never appears before that time, 
but at the first sight of him the students begin to stamp 
their applause and continue it until he gets behind his 
pulpit. He comes in with a rush, jerks off his hat ami 
overeoat, and pulls his manuscript out of his pocket as 
he goes toward the pulpit. He often commences to talk 
before he gets into the pulpit. As soon as the bell taps 
for closing the students begin to fold up their notes. 
The professor closes immediately or if he does not the 
students soon show by restlessness that it is time for 
him to close. He ends with a little bow peculiar to the 
Germans, is greeted with another stamping of feet, 
looks to see if anyone is coming to have his book signed 
and if not he starts on a run for the door and is the first 
out. Woe to the student who comes into the room after 
professor! He is geneialiy greeted with a scraping of 
feet. There is no whispering during the lecture. The 
professor is always greeted with the greatest respect. 

The students have access to the Royal Library and 
the University Library, but this is not so great an ad- 
vantage as it might seem from the fact that it is some 
what difficult to obtain the books desired. When a 
student wishes to get a book he must present his card 
at the library and buy some slips at two and a-half cents 
apiece, upon one of whieh he writes the name of the 
desired book, deposits the slip and returns next day to 
find that the book is out. 

The social side of life is not lacking among the stu- 
dents. A very enjoyable ( ?) evening was spent by an 
American with some German students at the house of 
one of the ministers of the city. The American was 
met at the door by the minister, who held a cigar in his 
hand, and was ushered into a room where six or seven 
students, all smoking, were gathered around a table upon 
which was a punch bowl containing perhaps four 
quarts of beer. As the American had not yet learned 
to drink beer he was offered seltzer-water. When 
supper was over they were entertained with music and 
ater sat down again to their smoking and drinking. 
Perhaps it might be thought that some American stu- 
dents would succumb to the smoke laden atmosphere of 
the gentlemans parlor, but not so with one who spent 
four years in the College building at Lake Forest. 

One thing which the average college student would 
doubtless consider a nuisance is that books as thev are 
put up for sale are bound in paper and it is necessary to 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



send them to a bindery and have them hound in cloth. 
There is an advantage in this as one can have all his 
hooks bound alike or in any manner which suits him 
best. The cost of the bindery is less than half what it 
is in America. 

The student has many opportunities of having the 
finest music. Rubenstein, D'Albert, Joachim and Mar- 
cella Sembrich can all be heard in Germany's capitol. 
No one would leave Berlin without visiting the mu- 
seums of paintings, sculptures and archaeological re- 
mains. 

One of the annoyances is to have your mail handed 
to you on Sunday mornings in church by a chance ac- 
quaintance who got it from Heir Somebody, who got 
it from nobody knows where; the only trouble with 
the address being that the "West" was joined with the 
street instead of with the city, as" W. Potsdamer St. 14, 
Berlin," instead of "Berlin W., Potsdamer St. 14." 
Since there is but one Potsdamer St. in all Berlin it is 
enough to make one think that the German postman is 
not a flattering exponent of German shrewdness. 

The continental Sabbath must necessarily impress 
an American vividly. Everything goes on upon the 
Sabbath just the same as on any other day. It seems 
to be the special day for delivering goods. The stores 
are usually open on Sunday from eight to ten o'clock 
and from twelve to two o'clock. Indeed the "Fest" or 
"Holy" days are more sacred than the Sabbath. 

One feature of Berlin life reminds us somewhat of 
Chicago. The city maintains a "shelter" for those who 
have no protection from cold and hunger. In this 
place thirty-one hundred people were cared for one 
night this winter. Each was given a bath, something 
to eat and a cot to sleep on. By getting a card from 
the police a person can stay there for six days. It is 
estimated that in this "shelter" and in private institu- 
tions of a similar character, scattered over the city, 
twenty-five thousand are thus cared for every night. 
Berlin with its devotion to learning, its admiration for 
the highest arts and its aristocrasy is not wholly lack- 
ing at least in the humane and kindly spirit which 
prompts our western metropolis. 

E. E. Vance, '95 



BIOLOGICAL CLUB MEETING. 

The program of the last biological meeting was un- 
usually good. It is a commendable fact that the stu- 
dents in their turn are taking hokl of their share of this 
work in the true spirit for which it was intended. Dr. 
Peckham's recent article on " Mental Powers of Spi- 
ders" was presented by Miss McKee. Mr. C. Thorn 
reviewed a series of very interesting physiological ex- 
periments by Francis Darwin on growth as illustrated in 
Cucurbiia. Mr. Swezey reviewed a paper by Prof. 
Sedgwick on experiments with the segmenting ova of 
Amphioxus. Mr. Uline gave a short talk on Adapta- 
tion of the Desert Flora. 



CONVERSATION. 

The following article from the Ariel is an admir- 
able discussion of the use and misuse of English in talk- 
ing, by those who ought to be faultless in this regard. 
We commend it to our readers: — 

To the man or woman not college bred there is 
nothing so surprising as the ordinary conversation of the 
collegian. They are surprised not so much at the mat- 
ter, for the}' probably expect no great distinction in 
subject or treatment, but at the words employed and the 
construction of sentences and clauses; in a word, at the 
rhetoric .and grammar. Here more than anywhere else, 
they seem to expect to find the collegian showing the 
results of his or her education. They expect purity of 
diction, facility of expression, a proper regard for the 
rules of grammar. In conversation with the average 
student they are unpleasantly surprised to find that 
although their companion seems to be at no lack for 
words, they are of a character so extremely slangy that 
it is difficult for one not well schooled (it ought to be 
said well colleged) in the language to follow the 
thought. This is a fact remarked by almost all who 
have an extended acquaintance with students. Slang 
seems to constitute a major part of their conversation. 

This ought not to be the case. People have a right 
to expect that the collegian shall employ the English 
language not "as she is spoke" but in its purity. The 
doctrine attributed to one of the country's most promin- 
ent educators, that the sole object of education is to 
teach the student how to speak and write his native 
language fluently and correctly is too narrow to receive 
general acceptation. The student ought to know more 
than such a doctrine demands. But with such further 
knowledge he certainly ought to have the ability which 
such a theory, when put into practical execution, would 
give him. Without this ability he is comparatively 
helpless either in the battle of active life or the more 
quiet warfare of a scholar's life; with it he is doubly 
armed. Without it he is like a workman using un- 
familar tools; with it, like one whose hand knows every 
curve and dent in the handle of the keen edged knife 
he uses. 

Generally speaking the student can express himself 
clearly, correctly, forcibly on paper. Fluency is not 
common even here. But require him to carry on an 
ordinary conversation without the use of slang and 
withont violating the rules of traditional grammar and 
he apparently puts forth as much effort as the dentist 
in pulling a tooth and at the same time feels much as 
the patient does under such circumstances. Such an 
experience is apt to give the subject food for thought. 
If the thought results in resolution and action, he is 
generally thankful for it. 

For the student, the acquisition of the ability to ex- 



press himself clearly, correctly, fluently is a matter of 
practice. This is necessary but it pays well. The ad- 
vantage which this ability gives the man who possesses 
it over those intrinsically his superiors is too much a 
matter of every day experience to admit of doubt. The 
college life offers the best opportunity for the forma- 
tion of either habit. Our University ought to be known 
as one whose gr»duates and, in fact, all of whose stud- 
ents have formed the good one. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

ATHLETICS. 



THE ATHLETIC ENTERTAINMENT. 

The entertainment given under the auspices of the 
Athletic Association on Friday evening last was suc- 
cessful in filling the Art Institute, consequently bring- 
ing a large amount of money into the association treas- 
ury. We congratulate the committee in charge on the 
complete success of the evening. 

The first part of the program consisted of mixed 
selections, the second part of a one-act play. The 
Banjo Club began the exercises, followed by Mr. "W. 
E. Danforth in a character recitation of "Knee Deep 
in June," which captivated the audience. Mr. G. \V. 
Wright sang the popular "Drill, Ye Terriers, Drill," 
accompanied by the Double Quartet. W. E. Heages 
rendered a violin selection, and Mr. Wright read Dick- 
ens' description of the "child wife," from "David Cop- 
perfield." The Mandolin Club played a selection, and 
the Glee Club gave an excellent pot pourri. Consider- 
ing the fact that this was practically the first public ap- 
pearance of any of the musical clubs, their perform- 
ances were highly creditable. 



It looked for a while as if all the fellows who go to 
the gymnasium this year were honest, but lately several 
boys have had money taken from their pockets. One 
afternoon last week about five dollars were taken. Put 
in lockers, and stop the stealing. 

Of late there has been considerable damage done to 
windows and apparatus in the gymnasium, and in almost 
every instance it is traceable to some of the smaller 
Academy students. These boys seem to have no respect 
for anybody or anything, but throw the apparatus 
around the floor, bother persons who are trying to ex- 
ercise, and some of them make it a business to interrupt 
hand-ball by rushing back and forth across the courts 
right in the middle of a game. The older Academy 
fellows dislike this just as much as the college men. 
Perhaps it would be a good scheme to allow those be- 
low a certain age to use the gymnasium only during 
third-class hours. 

Captain Hayner is hard at work with the basehall 
candidates. He is getting them in shape by light work 
every afternoon, principally in passing the baseball and 
playing handball. Most of the work is done by the 
nrielders and the batting candidates, although the out- 
fielders are put through some general work. It is pro- 
bable that the ball team will take a trip this year, and 
every one who has ever played ball ought to get out 
and practice in order that there may be a large number 
of candidates to choose from. 

This is probably the most successful year financially 



The short play that followed was an excellent bit that athletics have ever had in Lake Forest. Instead 



of acting, and surpassed that of average amateurs. 
The characters were well assigned, and their several in- 
terpretations excellent. Caffer's (Goodman) easy feli- 
city contrasted admirably with the .abruptness of Pad- 
dles (Lewis). Miss Dillin as the servant gave an 
original and realistic interpretation. North', as the old 
uncle, was natural but rather quiet. The parts of the thincr 



of starting in the spring with the association in debt, 
we start out this time with a considerable amount in 
the treasury. 

Northwestern has started out as usual with a lot of 
bluster. They have elected Kedzie, the famous Yale 
catcher, as captain, and as usual expect to defeat every- 



heiress and her friend, rendered by Miss Pate and Miss 
Stoddard, were also realistically interpreted, and re- 
vealed careful preparation. "The whole production, in 
fact, bore evidence of study and care. In one or two 
places only the conversation fell a little short of the 
requisite amount of snap and life. The following was 
the cast of characters : 

Robert Capper, a young artist, much in debt Harry Goodman,'94 
Mr. Gargle, his uncle, P. E. North, '9S 

Paddles, an oil and color man, D. D. Lewis, '9:; 

Annie Pestle, an heiress, Gertrude Pate 

Bertha Bingham, her penniless friend Lita Stoddard 

Mrs. Mills, Capper's old servant, Nellie R. Dillin 

Scene — The Artist's Studio. 



'in the usual way." Mr. Frank Griffith, last 
year's captain and pitcher, and their famous center- 
fielder, Barnes, will assist. 



A RIDE. 






Of every ill is love the cure, 

Howe'er so great that ill may be; 

But if thy ill be love itself, 
Alas, no cure is left for thee. 



I was trotting out my Latin, 
'T was a lovely winter night, 
All the world without was lovely, 
'Neath the moonbeams' mellow light. 
" Oh, how fair with horse and buggy 
O'er the hills and vales to go! " 
But my room-mate just retiring, 
All at once cried out with woe, 
" Why, this bed's a little buggy! " 
" Good, that's what I want," I cried, 
" Let us hitch it to this pony, 
And we'll go and take a ride." 

— Lafayette. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



The University Stentor. 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry- L. Bird, '94, 
David Fales. Jr., '96, 
W. B. Hunt, '94, 

A. O. Jackson, '96, 
Prof. J. J. Halsey, 
D. H. Jackson, '96, 
Chas. Thom, '95, 

Miss Eudora Smith, '94, 
Miss F. Somerville. i 
Miss Mabel Palmer, J 
S. E. Gruenstein, I 

B. S. Cutler, t 
A. F Bourns. '94, 

C. B. Moore, '95, 



Editor 
Assistant Editor and Town Topics 

Locals 

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Aletheian 



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Per Year, in advance, 

Single Copies, 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Commmunications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111., as second-class matter. 



TARIFF discussions are perhaps a little out- 
side the realm of college journalism, but 
there is one feature of the Wilson Bill on 
which we cannot forbear to comment. If we 
are rightly informed, the bill retains the old 
tax of twenty-five per cent upon English books. 
It is difficult to see any justification of such a 
duty. The revenue gained is slight. As for 
encouraging "home industries" it is valueless, 
for a tariff on books cannot affect the literary 
work of a country. The infant industry of 
- Ferry Hall authorship does not respond to political cod- 
ling. If a carpenter wants a manufactured 

Academv 

article, such as a hammer for example, which 

Business Manager 

Advertising is covered by a protective tariff, he will take 
an American-made hammer, but if a reader 
wants Edwin Arnold's poems his requirements 
cannot be equally well met by the writings of 
some American author. 

A vigorous effort is being made by The 
Dial to enlist the friends of culture, irrespective 
of party, in an effort to secure the, removal of 
the duty upon all books printed in the English 
language. It terms the old law the "protection 
of ignorance, a tax upon enlightenment," 
which places obstacles In the way of communi- 
cation with the thought of other countries. 



$1.50 
.05 



* 
* * 



THE STENTOR has always been very 
very careful this year not to criticize any 
action of the college faculty. We feel, how- 
ever, that the request made of the senior class 
for graduating thesis is unreasonable. It is 
stated that a thesis in line with the student's 
major subject will be required. In the first equipment, but despite that fact she seems to 
place, practically none of the class have a 
"major," in the strict sense of the word, as the 
new curriculum has been in operation only a 



OUR neighbor, "the great" Chicago Uni- 
versity, has money professors, and ample 



year. Secondly, only three months at most 
are given in which to do the original investi- 
gating and all other necessary work of pre- 
paring and writing a thesis. Under these con- 



be suffering from a dread disease. This almost 
incurable malady is known as " lack of college 
spirit." To make matters worse at Chicago, 
it has been discovered that the complaint is 
not merely local, but deep-rooted and general. 
Let the following dire words from the U.oJ C. 
Weekly be a perpetual object lesson to Lake 



ditions it seemt utterly impossible that a thesis Forest students not to abate in the least par- 
could be presented worthy of the name. ticular the present healthy college spirit, but 

Of the further action of the faculty in re- rather to go on to upbuild and strengthen it: 
gard to commencement we will not speak, ex- "The failure of the mock congress is a sad 

cept to say that the place of dropping the commentary on the enthusiasm of the student 

usual senior vacation rentiers it extremely body. And yet it only serves to prove that the 

doubtful whether the class will be able to give men who attend this University care for naught 

a "class day," or any special exercises. save themselves, their own advancement, and 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 7 

their own pleasure. We delude ourselves in COLLEGE LOCALS. 

thinking that we have any college spirit or ., ,, , • , , i- r mi * i 

Dr. Coulter was in Indianapolis from 1 hursday 

harmony. We have failed to show any in our lllU ;i Sunday. 

conduct toward the college literary societies, ™, TT . 

1 he University catalogues are expected to appear the 

in our athletic organization, and lastly in our first part of next month. 

attitude toword the Mock Senate. College D . D . Lewis > father and mot her attended the Athletic 

clubs and college societies live on college spirit. entertainment of last Friday evening. 

When a little enthusiasm and love for the The Stentok was slightly delayed in making its 

University Can be pumped into the inanimate appearance last week, owing to a fire in the office of 

majority here, athletics and society will the Crai S 1>ress - 

thrive " ^' le Chess Club now has sixteen members. A 

* schedule of games has been made out, and several 

He ,■ . i ., ■.• i sjames already been played, 

b Lrovernment postal authorities have ° ' J 

recently ruled that periodicals issued under The light-fingered gentry got in their work down 

., ,-i i „ t ■ ,.• in the gym. one day last week. Several fellows report 

the auspices or benevolent or secret societies ; . . F 

losses of money, in amounts ranging from ^o cents to 
and colleges and institutions of learning can- , dollars 

not be admitted to the mails like other news- ^ ■ ., ., , . ., 

Owing to the athletic entertainment, the societies 

papers, at one cent per pound postage, but held no meetings on Friday, and meetings for the 

must go as third-class matter at One cent per coming Friday have been postponed on account of the 

copy. It is presumed that this ruling is made lecture ' which comes on Feb - 2 3 rd - 

on the ground that such publications are pub- The L ^ ke Forest University Glee, Banjo, and 

,. , . , ,. , . - , ... Mandolin Clubs were photographed last Saturday at 

hshed only tor advertising the institution or Tr . , ,, .. „. . _f . , * 



T 



Harrison's Studio, Chicago. Two very satisfactory 

society by which they are issued, for under the negatives were obtained. 

preseot law all papers haying a regularly paid Profc «or Booth's classes in elocution will this sen.- 

subscription list, and not published for the ex- ester take up a study of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." 

elusive purpose of advertising a particuar busi- The P la y win bc studied principally with the view of 

ii , .1 i i r ascertaining and reproducing its dramatic effects. 

ness are allowed the mentioned low rate ot J & 

postage. The ruling is evidently based on a Dr. Coulter's article on athletics in our last issue is 

. i t r ,i i r deserving of special tdought and attention, particularly 

misconception at least or the aim and scope ot & j & »i 

his views in regard to making some provision for the 

the college papers. \\ hen it comes to paying young ladies of the colleffC in the line of gvmnasium 

postage there is no reason why the ordinary facilities. 

college papers should not be classed with ordi- The Easter vacation, scheduled to begin, Wednes- 

nary newspapers. In order to have no doubt day, March 21, will probably commence two days 

about the matter, however, a bill has been in- 1;,ter - at least such a change has been suggested, and 

. . 1 1 1 t r ir- would doubtless prove more satisfactory to all. There 

troduced into both the House and Senate to , ,, , , , ,. , a . , 

is no reason why the change could not be ertected, as 

amend the present law, so as to admit to we w ;n not have the usual spring examinations to con- 

the mails as second-class matter all periodical tend with. 

publications of the class named. This act is The blizzard of Monday showed that some repairs 

called the " Manderson-Haines Bill," and it are badly needed in the roof of the Art Institute. The 

is earnestly requested that as many of our ^^nts, particularly those who recited upstairs Tues- 

, . , day, were kept dodging to avoid a ducking from the 

readers as can do so, write to the senator or . ,. c 

descending streams ot water. 

representative from their state or district urg- «,.,,.« , ^ , , ,. , ■ 

Miss (uha Brown, ex - 96, has entered larkio 

ing the passage of the bill. It is not a partisan College, Mo., where she will be a member of '95, 

measure, but a simple act of justice, which if « whence," she says, « we may judge the requirements 

not passed means many dollars of additional for graduation, which are good as far as they go." Her 

expense to a class of publishers who do not father, Rev. Dr. Brown, has been called to the pastor- 

deserve, and who can least afford to meet it. ate of the Presbyterian Church in Tarkio. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Miss Bessie Beach, ex-'94, spent Sunday with Miss 
Gilliland. 

The regular Friday evening meeting of the Alethe- 
ian Society was held on Saturday afternoon, after 
which a short reception was given for the purpose of 
meeting our honorary members and alumna?. 

The Misses Adams, '93, made the Aletheians a visit 
Saturday. 

Miss Pearl Tilford of Chicago spent a few days 
with Miss Oberne recently. 

The Academy received a large amount of free ad- 
vertising the first part of last week, owing to the un- 
conventional way in which Lincoln's birthday was cel- 
abrated. The Chicago Evening Journal depicted the 
occasion in glowing terms, so the Times sent out a 
reporter to investigate. He was the proud possessor of 
a nineteen-story imagination that Rider Haggard might 
envy. His account was more than a thrilling word- 
painting — it was a verbal chromo in assorted colors. 
The Academv faculty are only now fully recovering 
from the shock which the newspapers caused them. 

Programs have been distributed for the Bible Insti- 
stitute which begins on Friday evening of this week 
and extends to Sunday evening. The list of speakers 
and topics was published in the last issue of The Ste.n- 
tor. No one who can do so should miss the oppor- 
tunity of attending these lectures, for the speakers are 
all men of high authority and entertaining address. 

Messrs. E. A. Drake, H. G. Timberlake and ]. H. 
Rice attended the District Y. M. C. A. convention at 
Blue Island last Saturday and Sunday. 

The Prohibition Association of the state offers two 
prizes, the first of twenty dollars and the second of ten 
for the two best orations, to be determined at a contest 
in which one from each college in the state may com- 
pete, giving an oration on some Prohibition subject, not 
more than two thousand words in length. 

A student of Rush Medical is reported ill with black 
small-pox. The patient is on a fair road to recovery. 

The new catalogues of McCormick Seminary are 
out. A pleasing feature is a very neat cut of its build- 
ups on So. Halsted street. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

The meeting of the Art Institute this week takes 
place at the home of Mr. I. P. Rumsev tonight. Mr. 
George L. Hunter, of the University of Chicago, will 
lecture on "The French Drama." Mr. Josef Yilim 
will render selections on the violin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Durand and Miss Harriet Du- 
rand are attending the Midwinter Fair in San Francisco. 

The Misses Florence and Helen Durand visited in 
Milwaukee Sunday. Miss Florence Durand is in 
Beaver Dam, Wis. 



Miss Beth Haven gave a valentine party last Wednes 
day to the younger generation of Lake Foresters. 

The blizzard of Monday, Feb. 12th, not only roiled 
the water in the lake, but by piling ice over the intake 
of the water works, prevented the filtering of the city 
water. Therefore the citizens of Lake Forest were 
compelled to use for a few days a very muddy and dis- 
agreeable liquid. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

In accordance with the new scheme lately introduced 
into the Academy, it is necessary to drop the work in 
General History. The time of the class is to be given 
to Rhetoric, till the early part of next term. The work 
in History has been profitable and interesting, and many 
regrets have been expressed that it is to be discontinued. 

The two Academy societies held their preliminary 
essay contests on Wednesday of last week. Mr. R. G. 
McKinnie was the winner in the Gamma Sigma, which 
Mr. A. O. Stoops will represent the Tri Kappa in the 
Spring contest. This ends the list of preliminary con- 
tests in the Academy, which have been going on this 
term. 

It was the privilege of two of the Academy students 
to attend the last meeting of the University Club. In 
commenting on the p.iper on the Iliad which was read 
by Professor Burnap, Professor Thomas said that the 
entire architectural structure of the poem had been ar- 
tistically presented. 

Tri Kappa has had her new constitution printed and 
copies are being distributed among her members at 10c 
per cop) . 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

Thursday next we will celebrate Washington's birth- 
day with appropriate exercises. Mr. X. D. Pratt will 
lead a large chorus of students in singing patriotic 
songs, and Hon. Wm. E. Mason will make the address 
of the day. The ceremonies will all be held in the 
Art Institute building at 10 a. m., President Coulter 
presiding. Everyone is cordially invited to be present. 
In the evening, in the college chapel, the three literary 
societies of the college will celebrate in a joint meeting 
by rendering ihe following program, with MissEudora 
Smith, president of the Aletheian society, presiding: 
Address of welcome by the presiding officer; "Rela- 
tion of the College Societies," by Harry Goodman; 
"What Washington's Birthday Means to Us," by C. 
B. Moore; Sketch, by F. A. Hayner; a series of five- 
minute talks on Washington, before, during, and after 
the Revolution, by Miss Abbie Davis, A. P. Bourns, 
and David Fales, jr.; a poem, by Miss McClanahan ; a 
society paper, by Miss Weatheihold and Messrs. Coulter 
,md Bishop, and closing remarks by A. O.Jackson. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



FERRY HALL. 

Miss Somerville visited in Evanston Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Miriam Hair, was the guest of Miss Birchel, Friday 
and Saturday. 

Miss Eddy of Chicago, was the guest of Miss Behcl 
over Sunday. 

Blanche Dean, spent the latter part of the week at 
her home in the city. 

Misses Marder, Pride and Boutou spent Sunday at 
their respective homes in the city. 

The Senior Club, which was to have met Thurs- 
day, has necessarily postponed its meeting two weeks. 

Miss Phillips, of Northwestern University, came 
up Friday p. m., to attend the comedietta given by the 
athletic association at the art institute. 

On Friday p. m., Dr. Seeley gave a very instructive 
and entertaining lecture, to the teachers of Highland 
Park, taking for his subject of discourse, Herrbart. 

The students of German had their regular weekly 
meeting Monday evening. This is a very good place 
for teaching aptitude in speech and should be encour- 
aged by all who are studying this language. 

The Zeta Sigma held its regular meeting Wednes- 
day p. m. The hour was devoted to drill in Parlia- 
mentary rules, which is a much-needed requirement 
and we are glad to see the young ladies taking up the 
work with so much enthusiasm. 

Prof. Eager very kindly chaperoned a party of 
twelve young ladies to "Which is Which" Friday even- 
ing. But this was not all. Those who were so fortu- 
nate as to go with him were given a delightful sleigh- 
ride before the play, and a grand ride home in the 
moonlight afterward. 

The phrenologist, Dr. Howard, spent Wednesday 
and Thursday afternoon laboring over the numerous 
humps and ridges on the heads of a number of the 
young ladies. Later, the young ladies on comparing 
notes found out that most of them possessed the same 
qualities, talents and weaknesses. Since this discovery, 
their faith in phrenologists is lacking. 

News of the holiday given to the college and 
academy students, Monday, Lincoln's birthday, no 
sooner reached the ears of the deminary girls, then 
they wondered why they couldn't have a vacation too. 
It was, however, too late to secure a whole day, yet the 
girls were not slow to accept the afternoon which was 
granted them, and with which they might do as they 
chose. 

The following communication was received by one 

of the teachers concerning a Ferry Hall Student of '92 : 

"We are quite surprised yet pleased to learn that 



our friend, Miss May Cabot, had indulged in matrimo- 
ny. Miss Cabot was a successful teacher in the public 
schools of this place from '83 to '88. She has since 
been teaching and attending college elsewhere. Mi-s 
Cabot is a highly educated lady, and possesses an un- 
blemished character. She became the bride of Mr. 
Thomas Diller, editor of the Sterling Standard. We 
join Mrs. Diller's many friends in wishing her a mar- 
ried life free from all sorrow." 

Last Tuesday evening, St. Valentine's eve, the 
Seniors were "at home" to a large number of gentle- 
men, all of whom were born poets (so the young iadies 
say ironically). They arrived in time to post theirowu 
( or some one else's) modest extravaganzas in the Fun 
mail box. When the receptacle was opened by Miss 
Mcintosh and Miss Bainum, it was found to be com- 
pletely filled with billet doux and billet timer. As the 
valentines were distributed a phrenologist would have 
h id a good opportunity for character study, for clouds 
and sunshine chased one another across the faces of 
many individuals as they found a "slam" or the reverse. 
A little later, over cocoa and sandwiches, valentines 
were compared, analysed, criticised, and some came near 
being ostracised. Almost anything passed for a valen- 
tine if the lines ended like the following (you can sup- 
ply the rest by intuition): "mine, thine; pine, — tine; 
love, dove; kiss, bliss." Miss Bird read a valentine to 
the class by an unknown genius, and the unclaimed val- 
entines for the prettiest and most entertaining girl of 
the class, and for the most stylish, were awarded by 
ballot to Miss Clark and Miss Parmenter. All present 
were charmed with the novel entertainment of the 
evening. 

Seniors Valentine from a guest who was at Ferry 
Hall Tuesday evening, February thirteenth. 

We meet to-night, St. Valentine's eve, 
Tokens of respect to give and receive, 

Some perhaps, are bent in jest, 
But others are sent at love's behest. 

Cupid's arrows have been Hying fast, 
Piercing the heart of both lad and lass. 

This meeting in L. F. N. has borne its fruit, 
And in some hearts love's tree has taken root. 

Not all in joy do we meet this night, 

For some foresee, "to win," means to tight. 

And in the not far distant day in June, 
We'll feel, we've met and parted all too soon. 

For when has come and gone this eventful day, 
Some will not have said what they meant to-dav. 

And some will say that'.-- just my fate, 
And others will civ too late, too late. 

So to-night, Cupid, our messenger will be, 
And he shall carry what love's eve seems to sec. 

Other schools may speak of their ladies with pride. 
Of their beauty, attainments and influence wide. 

But to us none are so jjretty good and true, 
As the Ferry Hall Seniors of L. F. U. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



COMMUNICATION. 
To the Editor of t/ic Sto/tor : 

1 learn that there is soine missapprehension about the 
charge made for the library lists. These lists have 
nothing to do with the $300 library fee, which is ex- 
pended on new books and current expenses at the 
direction of the library committee. It is I believe, 
customary to charge for such lists, and in this case all 
money received is applied on the printer's bill. These 
lists were started and prepared on this plan of partially 
covering expenses. 

H. M. Stanle,v Librarian. 



EXCHANGES. 

The "marking system" has lately been abolished at 
the University of Minnesota. 

Prof. F. P. Barnard of the Lick Observatory is ex- 
pected to become head professor of Astronomy at 
Chicago University as soon as the Yerkes Telescope is 
finished. 

Dr. Kinley of the University of Illinois is giving a 
course of lectures on "Money and Banking" at the 
University of Wisconsin. A live subject handled by 
a specialist is most interesting. 

The University of Michigan is making elaborate 
preparations for its summer school this year. 

Oberlin has recently received two bequests, one of 
$25,000 and another of about $14,000. 

The S. U. L. §hiill presents this week pictures of 
of the football team, baseball team and track team of 
Iowas University accompanied by a symposium on the 
subject of athletes. 

Changed Requirements. 

The Yale Scientific School has added to its require- 
ments for admission in 1S95, botany and French, either 
two, the latter to be translated at sight in easy sentences 
In Latin, one more book of Virgil is added, and also an 
examination is required in certain standard English 
works. Part of the new requirements can be taken at 
the preliminary examinations this year. 

Flattery has been called the "basest of insults," but 
most of us can take it in very large doses without be- 
coming sick at the stomach. — Ex. 

Metamorphoses. 

A little iron, 

A cunning curl, 

A box of powder, 

A pretty girl. 

A little rain , 

Away it goes, 

A homely girl 

With a freckled nose. — Ex. 



"Mr. Flunk, will you solve me this problem?" 

"Don't think I can do it," said he. 
"I shall credit you, then with a zero;" 

Well, sir, that is nothing to me? — Ex. 

Among our new arrivals we rind a bright, interest- 
ing little quarterly. The Kodak, from Downer College, 
Fox Lake, Wis. This college was asvarded a diploma 
and a medal for its exhibit at the World's Fair. 

The ~£g-is, of Madison, is now offering a first and 
second prize for humorous articles. 

The editor of the Oberlin Review must have had a 
case of " blues last week." He found fault with every- 
thing, from the curriculum to the Review staff, but he 
makes some very sensible suggestions about considera- 
tion for the comfort of others, and above all care that 
one's influence shall be for the good name of his alma 
mater. Avoid the appearance of evil, for be sure some 
one will call it real evil and use it to injure yourself and 
college. 

BOOK III, ODE IX. 

First Prize. 

Ah, Lydia, in those blissful days gone by, 
When I alone th) favor did possess, 
And from no other thou didst take caress, 
No Persian king was happier than I. 
While thou didst celebrate no other name, 

Xor Chloe had beguiled thee from mv side, 
My praises ever sounded far and wide, 
And Ilia could boast no greater fame. 
Now Thracian Chloe's mistress of my heart, 

Whose songs are sweet, whose lute is played with 
skill, 

For whom I'd die, if thus the Fates should will, 
Sooner than from my darling ever part. 
Love's torch burns bright for me and for that bov, 

To save whose life my own I'd gladly give, 

Aye, give it twice, if only he might live 
To comfort me, my pride, my only joy. 
What if that love return in all its might, 

And join these lives, to part them nevermore? 

What if to thee I'd open wide the door, 
And banish fair-haired Chloe from my sight? 
Although the stars cannot with him compare, 

And thou art fickle as the passing breeze, 

Thy wrath more fearful than the stormy seas, 
My heart is thine; thy lot I'd gladly share. 

— Unit. 

THINK OF IT 

4-POS-TIV-LY=12 

FOUR WEEKS by our method teaching bookeeping is 
equal t.. j WELVE WEEKS by the old style. Positions guar- 
anteed under certain conditions. Our "free" 56 and SO-page 
catalogues will explain "all." Send for them — Draughons Busi- 
ness College and School of Shorthand and Telegraphy, Nashville. 
Tenn. CHEAP BOARD No vacation. Enter any time 
Address, J. F. Draughton, Pres't, Nashville, Tenn. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



What's the matter? 

maatcb Stopped? feel Xost? 

Why Wait till you can go to Chicago or Waukegan? 

(So to Jfrencb's 

He will have it repaired in Chicago 

promptly, and in first-class style, 

and he will charge you onlv the 

regular Chicago rates. 

Terms Cash. 



Chicago's Leading Religious Weekly. 

Good 

.ivrr.NioK ; Sunday 7 
Reading 

For Sale at ISeivstantls. 





Zbe Craio press, 

{printers, flMiblisbers, Designers 
178=182 flDonroe street 
Chicago. 



J. H. BRUBAKER, 

rtist'SpKotognapfier 

Waukegan, III. 

Will give a rebate of K. R. fare to 
students in clubs of live, each one to 
take a dozen photographs, best finish. 
(Regular price $4.00 per dozen) . 

Studio Removed to 216 N. GENESEE STREET 

The W. T. Keener Co. 

PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS 
AND DEALERS IN 

MEDICAL and ROOkS 
SCIENTIFIC ••■JvJV^rVO 

96 Washington Street, 
Chicago 



TWERS CO-OPERATIVE HSSGGlflTION ch™ 

Established in 1884. Positions filled, 3790. Seeks Teachers who 

are ambitious for advancement rather than those without positions. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



^■^f 3 ^ 




WASHBURN 



GUITARS, 
Mandolins, Banjos, Zithers. 
' ; Best in the World/' 



'ery "Washburn' 5 Instrument Is 
i product of our speciai machin- 
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itainmg portraits of leadin ; 
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F. C, CALVERT & SONS, 

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REASONABLE RATE5 . LAKE FOREST. 



Four 1. 1 am! 

POPPIES 

Shirley, 

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See Vick's Flo- 
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jnp -^ 

gamen send address non- 
deducted fronanrst order. 



1«94, 
The Pioneer Catalogue < t Vege- 
tables and Flowers. 
Contains 1 12 pages 8xiQ% 
inches, with descriptions 
that describe, not mislead; 
illustrations that instruct x 
not exaggerate. 

Its cover is charming in 
harmonious 1 lending ol v a- 
ter color prints in green and 
white, with a paid I ack- 
ground—adreainoiTieauty. 
82 pages of Novelties printed in 
6 different colors. All the lend- 
ing novelties and the t est of the 
old varieties. 1 hese hard times 
you cannot afford to run am* 
risk. Buy Honest food's 
where you will receive Full 

Measure. It is not necessan 
to advertise that Vicka' setu's 
grow, this is known the world 
over, and also that the harvest 
pays. A very little spent for 
proper seed will save grocer's 
ami doctor's hills Jlanv 
concede Vick's Floral Guide 
the handsomest catalogue 
• forl894. If you love a fine 
with in rents, which may be 
$360 Cash Prizes for Potatoes. 



Rochester, Ji. Y, 



1AMES VICK'S SONS. 



U/eban's Ljuery 

Is the place for first-class 
RIGS and SLEIGHS. 
Lake Forest, - Illinois. 



Chicago College 

* DENTAL SURGERY 



MICHIGAN AVENUE AND FANDOLPH STREET. 



CHICAGO, ILL USA 



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FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 



Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

96 STATE STREET. 



THE GLOBE LIGHT and HEAT CO. 

MAKERS OF TDK CELEBRATED 

GLOBE GAS MACHINES. 

// e always keep on hand a full line of Supplies for our Gas Machines. 



52 & 54 Lake Street, Chicago. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Mrs. A. Williams, 

IRestauraut ant) 
* Choice Confectioner?, 

ice cream and salads of all kinds 

made to order 

choice Confectionery a specialty. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 



Lake Forest, III. 



F. BAIRSTOW, 



Cement 
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COAL 



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marble and granite monuments, 
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sewer pipe, drain tile, etc . 



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PLUMBER and GAS FITTER 



SANITARY WORK 
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NORMAN J, ROBERTS. 

DENTAL 
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WAUKEGAN. ILL. 



Variable 
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allowing privi- 

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Palace Drawing- 
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REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE 



"Seeing is Believing." 




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light, and more cheerful than either. The 
choicest bric-a-brac in the palace of a Van- 
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Ladies often like to go down among the large wholesale houses and buy of 
first hands. They will find at our salesrooms (the largest in tne world) 
a rare collection of Art in lamps. A catalogue to send you if you cannot come. 
THE ROCHESTER I.A3IP CO., 

^"The Rochester." 





CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
M I'NN «V" CO., who have bad nearly rift. v years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and bow to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to tbe inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by fart lie 
largest circulation of any scientific work in tbe 
world. 83 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, $2.50 a year. Single 
copies, *i-> cents. Every number contains beau- 
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houses, with plans, enabling builders to show tke 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN Jc CO., New York, 361 Broadway 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 

College. 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . . 



faculty: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 

EPHRAIM INGALS, A.M., M. D., Ph.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica 
and Medical Jurisprudence. 

DANIEL T. NELSON, A. M., M.D., 
Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D., President- 
Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 

HENRY M. LYMAN, A. M., M. D., Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

[AMES H. ETHERIDGE, A. M., M. D., Secretary 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 

JAMES NEVINS HYDE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 



NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and 

Physical Diagnosis. 

ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy, 
Descriptive and Surgical. 

NICHOLAS SENN, M.D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 

JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical .Surgery. 

E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. D, 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 

DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 
Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures begins about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



CHICAGO COLLEGE™ LAW 

THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 

faculty: 



HON. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D. 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court 
of Illinois. 



HON. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Justice of Appellate Court, 
First District of Illinois. 



HON. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

. . . AND OTHERS ... 

The Under-Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, annually 
and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year, begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, and 
continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion 

For further information, address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL. B. 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

S. E. Cor. Washington and LaSalle Streets. 



Chicago. 



University Tailor 




2 7 Wabash Ave. CRITTENDEN cor - Lake St - 

CHICAGO, 



Students' Stits to Order, S25.00 



Students' Spring Overcosts, $25.00 



1 



Vol. VII. 



March 7, 1894 



No. 19 




LAKE FOREST . . . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



At LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



/. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co-educatloual 

4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 
At CHICAGO, ILL. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the leading 
colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years of college 
work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of under- 
graduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth is given to a 
major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily work are offered in each 
of the following departments: 1, Greek: 2, Latin: 3, French: 4, German: 5, English: 
6, Biblical Literature: 7, Political and Social Science including History: 8, Philosophy: 
9, Mathematics: 10, Astronomy: 11, Chemistry: 12, Physics: 13, Zoology: 14, Botany: 
15, Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of Medicine, 
Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any department of the University, 

Address, Johfl M. COllltCr, President Lake Forest University 

Lake Forest, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



* ^be jfunftamental Xaw Book 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Commentaries. Present Ameri- 
can law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth by Blackstone in a system and manner that has never been surpassed. 
And so the American law student finds sooner or later that he must familiarize himself with it; of the several 
editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. 
Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He has erased the obsolete and irrevalent notes of earlier com- 
mentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on 
the constitution and laws of the United States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law; his career as 
teacher and expounder of the law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supple- 
mented the work by several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large meas- 
nre, a student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestion for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," "Local 
Government in Great Britain," "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," "Territories of the 
United States: 

THESE FEW SIGNIFICANT SENTENCES FKOM JUDGE COOLEY' S WOKK 
SHOULD BE BEAD BY EVEBY LAW STUDENT: 

"And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the 
fields of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away its 
tempting prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist. 
nor fail to explore the abundaut stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

" Nor. although there are many things in Blackstone which have ceased to be important in the practical administration 
of the law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished 
or obsolete may nevertheless have furnished the reasons for the things which remain and to study rules while ignoring their 
reasons would be like studving the animal anatomy, while ignoring tue principles of life which animated it. And it is notice- 
able also that though in England, where the common law and the statutes ment ioned by this author have been so greatly 
changed by recent legislation, * * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much- 
of the recent English legislation has no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Black- 
stone is much the most useful, as presenting us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to 
America, leaving us no trace in our statutes and decisions its consequent cnanges here, unembarrassed by irrevalent informa- 
tion about parliamentary legislation which in no way concerns us." 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. 



THIRD EDITION. 
REVISED AND ENLARGED. 



Two Volumes, Octavo, Price to Students, $9.50, Prepaid on Receipt of Price. 

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TOMASO 

MANDOLIN 

ORCHESTRA 



AND 



MANDOLIN SCHOOL. 

21 CENTRAL MUSIC HALL, 

CHICAGO. 

Dr. Geo. Doerbecker, 

Dentist 

Graduate of Pennsylvania College 
of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia. 

Office: 134 Washington Street, 

Opposite 1st Nat'l Bank, 

Waukegan, Illinois. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII 



TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1894 



No. 19 



ROBERT W. PATTERSON. 

LAKE FOREST'S FIRST PRESIDENT. 

The death of the Rev. Robert W. Patterson. D. D. , at 
his home in Evanston last Wednesday removes one of the 
most notable figures in the history of the Northwest 
during the last fifty years, and recalls with renewed 
interest the establishment of Lake Forest University forty 
years ago under his leadership. Dr. Patterson was born in 
Blount County, Tenn., January 24, 1814, but came when 
still a little child with his parents to Pond County in this 
state. He was educated at Illinois College and Lane 
Seminary' and entered upon the pastorate of the Second 
Presbyterian Church of Chicago in 1842, a position which 
he served until 187.1. In 1854 and 1855 Dr. Patterson had 
frequent conferences with Dr. Harvey Curtis, of the First 
Church, and Dr. Charles Quinlan, now of Evanston. and 
the Rev. Ira W. Weed, of Waukegan, which resulted in 
their selecting Lake Forest as the site for a Presbyterian 
college, and when the University was chartered in 1857 he 
was one of the original trustees, a position which he filled 
until 1878. In 1854 he was also one of the original incor- 
porators and trustees of the Chicago school for young 
women which became so famous under the presidency of 
Mr. Grover as Dearborn Seminary. On retiring from the 
pastorate Dr. Patterson assumed the duties of the chair of 
apologetics in MeCormick Semianry which occupied a 
portion of his attention until 1881. But in August 1875 
he was elected presi.l^nt of Lake Forest University, which 
at that time consisted of only the academy and Ferry 
Hall. In 1876, however, a large hotel, which stood on the 
present site of "Blair Lodge" was purchased, and in 
September a Freshman class began the real existence of 
the college. Dr. Patterson took up his residence in the 
college, and, assisted by Profs. John H. Hewitt and 
Edward P. Morris, carried on the instruction of the insti- 
tution. In December 1877 the building was destroyed by 
fire, and after some disheartening months Dr. Patterson. 
now in his sixty-fifth year, retired in March 1878, and was 
succeeded in the presidency by a younger man in the 
person of Dr. D. S. Gregory. Dr. Patterson now retired 
to his Evanston home to a well-earned leisure. Yet. 
although his last thirteen or fourteen years were not 
occupied with official duties, he has taken an active part 
as a Presbyter in all the ecclesiastical life of this section 
down to the present year. His has been a familiar pres- 
ence at Presbytery, at Synod, at the weekly Chicago 
ministers' meeting and in "The Cleric." His stalwart 
form and benign countenance have been familiar to 
thousands of suburban travelers on the Northwestern rail- 
road, and he has been an ecclesiastical and social power 
in Chicago even to the close of his long and useful career. 
Lake Forest University will ever remember him as her 
principal founder and as a life long friend. We shall 
miss his sympathy, his counsels, and his presence, and 
shall cherish his memory reverently. He was a great. 
good man. J. J. Halsey. 



PAN-HELLENISM. 

Pan-Hellenism is that spirit which destroys the iron- 
bound and antiquated factional lines of student life, and 
permits one without prejudice to meet all his fellow 
students on a frank and equal footing. Whether these 
factional lines be strictly those of Greek fraternities or 
not, this term has come into common use in all college 
life, and the idea of Pan-Hellenism, keeping in step with 
all other progress, is becoming identified with the student 
life of all American schools. This idea has almost wrested 
the scepter from partisanship, whose long sway has been 
deplorable. This new Pan-Hellenic spirit is a far better 
sovereign, and it is to be hoped that it is typical of the 
thought of the modern college student. 

Though the student body of Lake Forest College is 
commonly understood to be hostile to the college fraternity, 
yet its worst phase is present, and Pan Hellenism has a 
definite and needed application to our own student life. 
We have two active societies, whose members are so keenly 
loyal that a strong and sometimes hostile partisan spirit 
is often the result. It is frequently evident that a student 
feels restrained from making a true friend and confidant 
b3 - the fact that the would-be friend is one of the men 
"at the other end of the hall," and unless such feeling is 
decidedly distasteful, he soon comes to the conclusion that 
"no good can come out of Nazareth." The method is 
charmingly simple, for it rests upon a single fundamental 
principle, namely, to consider no one in the other society 
good enough to be a friend. The cultivation of this 
principle makes it a necessity, even a duly, to freely criti- 
cise your neighbors. Open cordiality is permitted, but it 
must be borne in mind that by the right of tradition 
these rivals are enemies. Tradition, which hallows, often 
hampers. Who will hesitate to say that this spirit is 
antiquated? It should have been long since buried and 
forgotten in company with many other notions which were 
thought a generation ago to be an essential part of college 
life. 

The idea of organization is improvement. These 
literary societies are built upon the idea of improvement 
and do improve. But even when they come to demand 
the highest style of work from their members, then more 
than ever there is bred an inter-society spirit of rivalry 
which is not always generous, and often goes beyond 
rivalry and makes enemies. The perfection of a good 
work may stimulate bad sentiment. 

Further than this, profit eases, unless there comes 
Pan-Hellenism. Then there can be more than class-room 
contact with those of other societies. It is the thought 
which brings a liberty that permits unhampered progress. 
It is the voice which bids a college student leave his 
characteristic prejudice behind. It is the kindly light by 
which he can see much more than little virtue and much 
vice in rivals. It is the hand which takes from his eyes 
the bandage behind which he imagines too many faults in 
the others and good qualities in his own, and comes to 
think that "we are the saving remnant." It is the step 
upward which leads him to a higher plane of thinking. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



from which he may stretch out the hand of good fellow- 
ship to whomsoever he will, and say, "you are my friend." 
This thought, this voice, this light, this hand, this step 
is Pan Hellenism. 

The mind is a fertile field, and ideas have a rapid 
growth. A false idea at its conception is but a grain of 
mustard seed. A look, a turning of the hand, a step, and 
an embryo has been formed. It takes root and pushes 
forth. It develops and blossoms. The fruit is conviction. 
Its growth has been that of a parasite taking firm hold; 
but let the host suspect and doubt, and, if he be an honest 
searcher for the truth, there will be a battle. On the one 
hand, conscience; on the other, full-grown conviction. 
Conscience will win. 

For many years this institution of hostile factions in 
the student body has been supreme. The fact of hostility 
has proved it false. No doubt it was conceived in the 
honesty of a good idea, but it has overgrown, and its over- 
growth has brought evil. Through ambition an organiza- 
tion, as well as an individual, may become corrupted and 
dishonest. It is a sorry fact that the honor of a college 
student has come to be a questionable thing. The over- 
rivalry between college organizations has been the 
mother of college politics, than which there are none more 
unclean. Let this not be misunderstood. We do not think 
the remedy to be the abolition of all student organization. 
Far from it; for student societies and rivalry between 
them must never die, but their present confining, stifling 
atmosphere of narrow ideas must be purified. In it there 
can never live that love for all our fellow men whose 
possession means a successful life. This love, this un- 
prejudiced appreciation of any worth wherever it may be 
found, is choked and retarded in what might be its full 
and broad development. It is a good thing that the time 
is at hand in which new and better sentiment appears, and 
this battle between truth and tradition is nearly won. 
The individual student has already seen the wrong which 
has existed and will soon demand his right not to be 
restrained by the lines of the chapter or party to which 
he may belong, and to choose his friends without passion 
or prejudice from those he thinks most fit. His character 
will have full and free development. When he can place 
on an equal footing in his own mind the men of his own 
faction and all others of his fellow students, then this 
Pan-Hellenic idea will have won its just place. That 
unhappy prejudice which has been the natural outgrowth 
of these inflexible society lines will be overthrown. That 
overthrow signals new breadth of character and an impetus 
to more liberal development. It will bring a reign of good 
fellowship and universal confidence. Its first fruits will 
be honest co-operation and stronger college spirit. Hail 
the day when the college student may look his fellow men 
in the face "with good will towards all and malice toward 
none." John G. Coulter, '95. 



THE BIBLE INSTITUTE, 

A SUCCESSFUL SERIES OF LECTURES. 

The series of addresses just completed, constituting 
the "Bible Institute," formed a distinct novelty in Lake 
Forest. As all who had the privilege of attending the 
lectures recognize, the Institute was a complete success; 
the credit for which, we understand, belongs to Prof. 
Thomas. The object of the undertaking was to lead to a 
closer study of the Bible, by bringing out the facts 



necessary to a right understanding and appreciation of it. 
The attendance was excellent at all of the five addresses, 
and the speakers were listened to with interested atten- 
tion. 

The first lecture was by Bev. E. C. Bissell. D.D. , pro- 
fessor of Hebrew in McCormick Seminary. His subject 
was, "Methods of Higher Criticism as Illustrated in the 
Book of Genesis." The following is a syllabus of the 
lecture: 

a. Four stages noted in the history of Pentateuchal 
criticism: 

1. The theory of documents. 

2. The theory of fragments. 

3. The theory of a supplement. 

4. The second (present) theory of documents. 

b. Arguments examined by which the current analysis 
of Genesis is supported: 

1. Differences in material as to point of view. 

2. Variant accounts of the same event. 

3. Differences in style. 

4. Differences in vocabulary, especially the use of 
the divine names. 

5. Arguments illustrated in a special case — the deluge 
with the counter testimony of the monuments. 

0. Some facts brought to light by Genesis and their 
bearing on the question of its essential unity- 
Remark. — The analysis of Genesis was illustrated by 

a chart. 

On Saturday morning- President Coulter gave a clear 
and lucid presentation of the relation between "The 
Bible and Nature." A complete summary is appended. 
Saturday evening, Rev. N. D. Hillis, D.D., of Evanston. 
discussed "The Bible and Society," in his usual brilliant 
manner. A brief epitome of his address is as follows: 

1. Nature of the Bible. The Bible treats of the art 
of right living and of man in relation to his fellow man. 
Though the greatest book of peace it has been the greatest 
cause of trouble because it has been more misunderstood 
and has more life and action in it than any other book. 

2. Its relation to society. Society is the broadest 
term in use— except God. It includes man in all his rela- 
tions and is a growing germ which shall reach its full 
development in the final kingdom of God- 

3. The Bible with respect to outer and inner revela- 
tion. The Bible is but a photograph. Were it destroyed 
God's Bible would still be in the hearts of men. There 
are four ways in which the Bible is unique, (a) As a force 
in civilization, setting forth the nature of God. (b) As 
peculiar in its view of mau as an unfulfilled prophecy 
which needs another life in which to mature, (e) The 
element of Providence, (d) Human sinfulness. 

4. There are apparent organic contradictions, but no 
moral blunders. 

Rev. Joseph T. Duryea D. D., of Omaha, on Sunday 
morning, discussed "The Bible and History. " It is difficult 
to condense so lengthy an address, but the speaker said in 
part that in the history of the Hebrew people, of the 
gospel and of the church we anticipate the purpose and 
end of history. Abraham was the first man who had a 
conception of a mission and a clear idea of God. He estab- 
lished his home in Canaan, in the center of the first 
"circle" of civilization. In the zenith of its power it 
touched every known nation. Athens became the center 
of the second world circle through a mixture of northern 
and southern peoples and by the same process Rome 
becomes a center and mistress of the world. When the 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



German tribes shattered the empire they found Christianity 
woren in its branches. Caesar's kingdom had become 
Christ's. The Redeemer of mankind was conquering the 
world with a love that was at once force, energy and 
action. Without Abraham there would have been no 
crusades, no reformation and no settling of the New World. 
This view of history is sufficient proof of the divine origin, 
authority and power of Christianity. 

The last address of the series Sunday evening was 
delivered by Rev. Thos. C. Hall, of Chicago, on 'The 
liible a Supernatural Revelation Not Only to Man but 
Through Man." It was a splendid exposition of the limi- 
tations of man and (iod's use of these men even with all 
their limitations. We live in limitations out of which 
God has not chosen to lift us. Even the Bible shows traces 
of the limitations of its authors. The limitations of the 
authors of the Old Testament were greater than those of 
the New, both of which together are a revelation of God. 
Revelation is a steady unfolding. There is more yet to be 
revealed and it must be down through us or our 
descendants. 



THE BIBLE AND NATURE. 

A DIGEST OF J>R. COULTERS' ADDRESS. 

The great purpose of the Bible is to deal with human 
conduct, and its references to nature seem entirely inci- 
dental. An issue should never have been raised between 
the results of modern scientific investigation and the 
doctrines of the Bible. Such conflict as there has been 
was with theology, rather than religion, and the bible 
has been put in the very unfortunate 'attitude of being 
defended by theology against science, for science has won 
all the battles. 

Three phases of this man-nurtured contest between 
two parties, one of which had no cause for attack, and 
the other no occasion for defence, were considered, as 
follows: 

1. It has been claimed that every expression of the 
bible concerning nature must be true in the fullest scien- 
tific sense; and that its briefest references are but the 
surface flashing of an infinite depth of knowledge. Two 
classes of Bible statements were considered: those which 
refer incidentally to natural objects by way of illustration, 
and those in which nature seems to be the subject matter, 
such as the account of the creation. The general conclu- 
sion reached was that Bible expressions concerning nature 
simply represent man's observation and tradition, and 
are used to convey to his fellow man the great truths of 
religion, and that they hold the same relation to the 
thought to be expressed as does the language. 

2. The subject of miracles. These phenomena, what- 
ever they may have been, are entirely outside of the 
scrutiny of science, which has never had such events 
under observation, and deals merely with subjects of its 
own experience. The conclusion as to the relation of 
modern science to the miracles of the Bible was that there 
is no such relation; that the relation is to history; that 
miracles do not come under the observation of scirce: 
that science cannot add to or detract from their proba- 
bility, but that it is daily studying mirales more wonder- 
ful than any recorded under that name, and is daily dis- 
covering energy working in ways that had never been 
imagined. 

3. It has been said that the operations of God in 
nature, even in the development of organic life, are 



replaced by the so-called "laws of nature." The writers 
of the liible evidently saw the hand of God in all the 
operations of nature, and their belief was that God was 
immanent in nature. Into the Latin church, however, 
there early crept the belief that God was enthroned far 
oft', outside of an inert universe which He had created, 
and this conception has tinctured our beliefs ever since. 
This mediicval conception of God had more to do with 
the "conflict between science and religion" than anything 
else. The meaning of "natural law" was explained, as 
not indicating an entity, a something which acted differ- 
ently from God, but merely a convenient statement to 
express the observed results of certain relations. There- 
fore they could not be called "secondary causes" as they 
were not "causes" in any sense, but simply observed 
methods. Science has brought us back to the conception 
of God as immanent in nature, whose hand appears in all 
the wonderful forms of energy with which we are daily 
becoming more conversant. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Miss Julia Moss and Miss Ada Rainey spent Sunday. 
February 2~>, at their homes in Lake Forest. 

Miss Davis, who has been visiting Mrs. Gorton this 
wintef'. will return to Cincinnati in a few days. 

Miss Torrey, who has been visiting with Mrs. Fauntle- 
roy, will leave for her home in Vermont Wednesday, 
March 7. 

Mr. Marum gave the last of the series of chamber con- 
certs under his direction at the house of Mrs. Frank Hall, 
last Thursday evening. 

A series of classes has been instituted at the boy's 
club as follows: American history: Teacher, W. B. 
Hunt: bookkeeping; teacher not appointed. 

In the March number of the New England Magazine is 
an interesting and elaborately illustrated article on "Hans 
Holbein's Portraits," written by Mrs. Abby Farwell 
Ferry. 

The many towns people who attended the Washington's 
birthday celebration were very grateful to the students, 
and wish through The Stentor to give them thnaks for 
the patriotic entertainment. 

Communion services were held in the church last Sun- 
day, at which time an unusually large number united 
with the church, nearly forty persons being received by 
letter and confession of faith. 

The new posstoffice building which was opened last 
Wednesday for the first time, is in every respect an 
improvement over the old. The building was put up by 
Mrs. S. Lind, on her property, and the upper story will 
be used as a dwelling. Although the numbers of the 
boxes run up to 318. there are in all, counting the eight 
lock boxes,, only 256 letter boxes. The reason for this is 
that there are no box numbers ending in 9 or 0. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



TUnivemt^ Stentor 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY' STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY'. 

Harry L. Bird, '94, ------ Editor 

David Fales, Jr. , '96, - Assistant Editor and Town Topics 
W. B. Hunt, '94, I T , 

A. 0. Jackstn, '94, \ Locals 

Prof. J. J. Halsey', Alumni 

D. H. Jackson, '90, ... - Athletics 

Chas. Thom, '95, - Exchanges 

Miss Eudora Smith, '94, - Aletheian 

Miss P. Somerville, ( „ „ .. 

Miss Mabel Palmer, \ Kerry nan 

S. E. Gruenstein, ) . , 

B. S. Cutler, \ Academy 

A. P. Bourns, '94, - - - - Business Manager 

C. B. Moore, '95, - - - - - Advertising 



TERMS. 
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Address all Communications to the 

Lake Forest University- Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111 , as second-class matter. 

[Explanatory Note.] The editorial board greatly 
regret the non-appearance of The Stentor last week, but 
the failure was due to circumstances which they could not 
force and over which they had absolutely no control. 
Owing either to the "hard times" or to mismanagement, 
or both combined, the firm which has been printing our 
paper for the last two years was unexpectedly forced to 
suspend. We did not learn the true condition of affairs 
until too late in the week to make necessary arrangements 
with a new printing office, and under the circumstances 
had no alternative but to omit the issue entirely. It 
was an aceident which might happen to any paper not 
owning its own plant, and we make this explanation in 
order that our readers may understand the painful 
necessity which prevented them from receiving their 
papers last week. 

It is a frequently observed fact that college students 
as a rule are too often lacking in knowledge of contem- 
porary topics, including current political events and also 
recent literature. To remedy this deficit many colleges 
maintain a "Current Topics" Club, whose object is to keep 
its members abreast of the latest happenings in the world 
of politics and letters. A certain university has a "Coffee 
Club", organized to encourage the act of conversation by 
broadening the student's horizon so that he may be able 
to see beyond his college walls and campus. Formerly 
this want was here met to a certain extent by Prof. 



Halsey's elective in current politics, but since that has 
been dropped we are thrown back upon the inadequate 
resources of the College reading room for our general 
knowledge and culture. Although we have many organi- 
zations, a Current Topics Club might be a profitable 
addition. 



A scheme which has been tried with much success at 
Vale and other universities is that of having one general 
treasury for all the student organizations. Instead of a 
separate treasurer for each of the various branches of 
student activity, there is one officer who has charge of the 
funds of all the different organiaztions. This plan is now 
being agitated at Beloit, and from The Round Table we 
learn that the main feature of the system are that the 
four divisions of athletics — baseball, football, tennis and 
track athletics— should have a common treasury, into 
which are turned all receipts from games, together with 
the money realized by the Glee Club. This is the course 
pursued at Yale, where a large sum is obtained from the 
last named club. In addition The Stentor would suggest 
that if the plan is ever introduced here, the Oratorial 
Association and the Academy Athletic Association should 
be included. 

It is not desired that any of the organizations should 
lose their identity, but simply that there should be finan- 
cial union. The treasurer, who would not be an under- 
graduate, could have no part in determining the financial 
policy of the organizations, but would act merely as a 
bank of deposit. A board of control, to be composed of 
representatives from all the organizations named, and very 
probably faculty and alumni members also, would have a 
general oversight of all the interests involved. To this 
board the managers of the various associations would 
present their budgets at the opening of the season, and 
these could be carefully examined and revised, and filed 
with the treasurer. The managers would be compelled to 
keep within their budgets unless authorized by the board 
of control to exceed it. This board would thus practically 
be a board of trustees, having the financial welfare of the 
student organizations in charge, and is based on the 
assumption that the students are one body with common 
and not antagonistic interests. At the close of each 
season the managers would hand in to the treasurer reports 
with the balances on hand, or the deficits. The treasurer 
balances accounts, and if there is a surplus, well and 
good: if a deficit, a tax is levied per capita to make it up. 
The treasurer would be a graduate or possibly some mem- 
ber of the faculty. 

Under this plan the interests of the students would 
be simplified and consolidated. In reality it could be a 
broadening of the scope of the University Athletic Asso- 
ciation. Under the present arrangement the Oratorical 
Association and the tennis branch of athletics are left far 
in the rear of the procession: baseball and football men 
disagree over the right to funds; while track athletics 
take what they can get— which is usually a minus quan- 
tity. We have not brought out all the details of this 
scheme, for there are several ways in which they could be 
worked out. The main features are the board of control 
and the common treasury. While the idea may seem 
impracticable at first though, yet we believe that it pos- 
sesses merit and "adaptiveness, " and is well worthy of 
consideration. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

Have you seen the University pin? 

The entire Senior class will soon take up international 
law with Prof. Halsey. 

Mr. C. I!. Moore is making' a personal canvass of the 
route for the spring- tour of the Musical Clubs. 

Prof. Jack was called home to Farmington. 111., on 
Tuesday last by the death of an uncle. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Evanston, Dr. 
Ilillis' church, burned to the ground last week It will 
be rebuilt at once. 

The Mandolin Club has been greatly improved by the 
addition of Prof. Seymour, who plays the flute, and Mr. 
Hedges, the violin. 

Messrs. Carver. Drake and Graff are representing- the 
Y. M. C. A. of the College at the Detroit convention of the 
Student Volunteer Movement. 

President Coulter has made arrangements for lecturing 
in Macomb, Camp Point and Carthage, 111., and South 
liend, Ind., in a short time. 

On Saturday a number of the faculty and students 
attended the funeral services of Dr. Patterson held in the 
Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago. 

Invitations are out for the .Junior "Auction Sale" for 
next Thursday evening at Ferry Hall. One gentleman was 
so eager for the fray that he sent two acceptances. 

Last Thursday morning Prof. Halsey made a few 
remarks concerning the life of Dr. Patterson, especially 
as it was connected with the founding and growth of L. 
F. U. 

Prof. W. A. Loey lectured before the Iiiological Club 
of the University of Chicago on Wednesday, February 28. 
His subject was the "Metamerism of the Brain and Spinal 
Cord. " 

On Monday morning, February 26, the eight o'clock 
recitations wer° omitted and chapel began at 8:30, so that 
the students might be especially addressed by Dr. Duryea 
and Rev. Thos. C. Hall. 

The recent Iowa State Oratorical Contest was won by 
Mr. Frank McKean, a pupil of our Prof. liooth. He is 
attending Lennox College, of which Dr. Wilson, formerly 
principal of L. F. Academy, is president. 

Why wouldn't a more generous distribution of planks 
on the gravel walks about the campus be a good thing'. 1 
In order to get along in some places, pedestrians have to 
become swimmers or walk several hundred yards out of 
their way. 

A sleigh ride was enjoyed by a number of College boys 
and Ferry Hall girls in the afternoon of Washington's 
birthday. A stop was made at Mr. Pratt's for light 
refreshments, where the party also had their pictures 
taken. 

At the last meeting of the Hoard of Trustees the 
resignations of two of its honored members, Messrs. A. Z. 
Benedict and Walter C. Larned, were accepted. Two 
others not yet decided upon will be added to the Board at 
its next meeting. 



The law firm of Eakins & Matthews, of Chicago, com- 
posed of two former Lake Forest students, has recently 
succeeded Judge Bangs as attorneys for the Women's 
Protective Association. The Stentor is pleased to note 
the firm's increasing success. 

While glancing over a copy of "The World's Parlia- 
ment of Religions." in the frontispiece which represents 
an actual scene at one of the sessions, a reporter recognized 
among the audience the familiar face of Prof. Halsey. 
The likeness was very good, showing the professor in a 
characteristic attitude. 

The alumni of the Zeta Epsilon Literary Society have 
once more proved the lasting character of their interest in 
the society by presenting to it a beautiful and useful piece 
of furniture, in the shape of a combination book case and 
desk, which adds much to the general appearance of the 
society hall. 

Samples of the University pin of the design published 
in The Stentor February 13 were circulated last week, 
and met with unanimous approval, the pin proving to be 
much prettier than the design would indicate. The price 
is fifty cents for the silver and one dollar for the gold 
pins. Orders may be left with Rice Bros, at the College 
book store. 

The Senior Club held its last regular meeting on last 
Thursday evening. A pleasing recitation entitled "Widow 
Malone," by Miss Yertson, a reading, by Harry Goodman, 
of one of Frank Stockton's shorter stories, and vocal 
music by A. P. Bourns made up the literary part of the 
program, after which charades and refreshments occupied 
the remainder of the evening. 

Miss Bessie Beach, ex-'94, of Chicago, gave a delight- 
ful sleighing party on Friday evening, February 23. A 
dainty luncheon was served at her home on the South 
Side before the ride. Tin horns of diminutive size but of 
extraordinary noise-making power were furnished as 
souvenirs. The guests from Lake Forest were Misses 
Davies, Gilliland and Mellen and Messrs. H. L. Bird, A. 
P. Bourns. F. S. Mellen, E. E. Vance and W. B. Hunt. 

In a recent issue of The Bulletin there was an article 
on college finance clipped from the Chicago Inter-Ocean 
which wore a familiar look. Upon investigation it proved 
to be the main part of an article written some time ago by 
Mr. E. C. Cleveland, '94. This article, written for the 
Chicago Record, was republished by the New York Com- 
mercial Advertiser and then by The Inter-Ocean, from 
whence by The Bulletin. The incident in itself is quite 
complimentary to its author. 

It is said that the faculty do not intend to allow the 
baseball team to make an extended trip during the coming 
season. In this there seems to be just a slight display of 
discrimination in favor of certain elements in the college 
life. For instance, delegates to conventions dealing with 
religious matters are allowed to be absent without the 
least objection. Of course it may be said that baseball 
trips and journeys to missionary conventions are entirely 
different matters; however, the fact remains that the 
development of athletics, particularly inter-collegiate 
athletics, is a matter of almost as large importance as the 
development in the student body of an earnest missionary 
spirit. 



8 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



At the regular meeting of the Zeta Epsilon Society on 
Friday evening the following program was rendered: 
Dehate, " Resolved that the best interests of the United 
States require that the federal government make immediate 
provision^for the construction of the Nicaragua canal." 
Affirmative, W. F. Curry, W. S. McCullogh; negative, 
Alex. McFerran, E. E. Dodge. Decision of judges, three 
for the affirmative. Reading, "Sam's Letter," J. C. 
Lininger; talk, O. H. Swezey : character sketch — Emerson 
— W. E. Williams; declamation. H. Moore: "A Bit of 
Natural History," A. Black; poem, J. II. Rice. 



Y. M. C. A. ELECTION. 

At the annual election for officers of the Y. M. C. A. 
held on Tuesday evening, February 20, the following 
officers were chosen: President. .1. H. Rice: vice presi- 
dent, J. H. Jones; secretary, .7. M. Vance; treasurer, F. 
S. Mellen. At the same meeting delegates were chosen 
to attend the International Convention of the Students' 
Volunteer Movement. The gentlemen who went as dele- 
gates were Messrs. Vance, Drake, Graff, Currens and Car- 
ver. They started on the 28tb ult. for Detroit, the place 
where the convention was held. 



JOINT DEBATE. 

The leading event of the year at Lake Forest will be 
a joint debate on the Political Issues of the Day held at 
the Art Institute Thursday evening. March 8. The speak- 
ers will be ex-Congressman. William E Mason, who needs 
no introduction here now, and the Hon. C. E. Darrow, the 
well-known free trader of Chicago. The debate is to be 
given under the auspices of the Athenaeum Literary 
Society. No admission fee will be charged. 

Later. — Owing to an interrupting engagement of one 
of the speakers on the above night, the date has been 
changed to Friday, March Hi. 



A HINT. 

[We have received the following article, with no trace 
as to the writer's identity. Contrary to our usual rule in 
such cases we publish it, and trust that those for whom 
it is intended will profit thereby. — En.] 

In the age before man became so far removed from his 
quadrumanous ancestors, and when all created beings 
could convene, a gathering was called for a certain coterie 
of the birds and two rival companies of the animals. 

In anticipation of the event some of the animals took 
care to speak to their favorite feathered friends and en- 
gaged their company for the assembly. 

At the time appointed all wended their way to the dell 
decorated for the occasion. 

The chief of the birds had charge of the meeting, and 
well^prepared was she for that office, having held similar 
positions of honor before. With songs and instructive as 
well as amusing exercises the time passed rapidly and the 
company, highly delighted with their success, determined 
to try again. 

After improving their intellects the gay party turned 
to social pleasures, and for awhile the minutes flew 
swifter, yet trying to keep pace with twinkling feet and 
quick-answering tongues. And then appeared the first 
frowns of the assembly. Guards of powerful build and 



gracious carriage there were in abundance to attend each 
of the delicate warblers to their nests. Some had already 
engaged their companions for the journey, but sad to say, 
there were some of the pretty creatures who, unthought 
of, unnoticed, alone and by twos, with murmurs uncom- 
plimentary, slowly wended their way as they came. 

Ah me, what a dark shadow to be cast over an other- 
wise very happy and successful gathering, and all for the 
want of a little thought and care! Beau Brummel. 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

Washington's birthday was celebrated by the students 
and townspeople with fitting patriotism. The day has 
not been so appropriately observed in Lake Forest for 
several years. 

The credit of arranging the program is due to the stu- 
dents' committee, and to Mr. N. D. Pratt. The chorus 
of 125 mixed voices was trained for the occasion by Mr. 
Pratt, and the Art Institute was decorated and arranged 
by the committee. Dr. Coulter presided. The program, 
which began at 10 o'clock, was listened to by an unusually 
large audience, and was as follows: 

Piano Solo — Patriotic Medley, - Prof. Eager 

"My Country, 'Tis of Thee, Chorus and Audience 

Prayer - - Rev. J. G. K. McClure, D.D. 

"Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean," 

Ferry Hall and University Choruses 
Remarks ... - Tj r . Coulter 

Selections from Washington's Farewell Address 

Prof. J. J. Halsey 
"Song of a Thousand Years 

Mr. Chas. S. Lee, Ferry Hall and University Choruses 
Oration - - - Hon. William E. Mason 

"Battle Hymn of the Republic, 

Mr. Chas. S. Lee and Audience 
"America," - Audience 

Patriotism, as the emotion of the day, showed itself 
in everything. The members of the chorus waved small 
flags at opportune moments. Mr. Lee's singing, artistic 
and forcible, was especially impressive, and Mr. Mason's 
oration inspired patriotism in all his audince. His easy 
style and humorous adaptation easily prepared the way 
for his more serious thoughts. 

Some of the more important ideas which he empha- 
sized at different times were: the danger in believing our 
country and its government infallible, the benefits of 
liberal partisanship; and the part education plays in 
politics. That his address was enjoyed was shown by the 
attention and applause with which it was received. 

In behalf of the faculty and students the committee 
desires to extend to Mr. N. D. Pratt hearty thanks for his 
invaluable service in the training of the chorus, for 
securing the services of Mr. Mason and Mr. Lee, and for 
his gift of the programs and flags. The success of the 
celebration was largely due to his efforts. 

JOINT MEETING. 

In the evening the three college societies, the Alethe- 
ian, the Zeta Epsilon and the Athenaean, further signal- 
ized the day by a joint meeting held in the Athenaeam 
Hall, the president of the Aletheian Society presiding. 
This is the first union meeting which has been held for 
almost half a score of years, and for that reason if for no 
other is a notable occasion. However, the program pre- 
sented was an excellent one. It was as follows: 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



Address of welcome, by the presiding- officer, Miss 
Eudora Smith; violin solo, by Miss Grace Pearce; address 
— "The Relation of the College Societies," by Harry Good- 
man; vocal solo, by Miss Clara Mellen ; address — "What 
the Day Means to Us," by C. U. Moore; sketch — "Wash 
ington's Domestic Life." by F. A. Hay me; medley, on 
piano, by Miss McLean; three talks — "Washington Before 
the Revolution," by Miss Abigail Davies: "Washington 
During the Revolution," by A. P. Bourn, and "Washing- 
ton After the Revolution," by David Fales. Jr. ; "Society 
Paper," edited by Miss Nona Phelps, W. A. Bishop and T. 
G. Coulter, and read by the latter; "Poem," by Miss Me- 
Clanahan; "Closing Remarks," by A. O. Jackson, and 
music by the College quartet. 

After the exercises an informal reception was held. and. 
needless to say, it was highly enjoyed by all. 



FERRY HALL. 

Mr. Lapp, of Chicago, visited Prof. Eager Tuesday. 

Miss Norton has resumed her duties as French in- 
structress. 

Miss Alta Barnum, '93, was the guest of her sister. 
Miss Blanche, during the latter part of last week. 

Miss Abbie Blair spent Saturday and Sunday in 
Evanston, the guest of Miss Annie Lord. 

Miss Helen Chapin was compelled to l'eturn home last 
week on account of illness. We trust she will soon be 
able to be with us again. 

Dr. and Mrs. Seeley have very kindly consented to 
chaperone a party into the city next Monday evening, to 
hear the Italian Opera Company in its presentation of 
" Faust. " 

Miss Levinia Behel has bade farewell to Ferry Hall. 
She will not return to school again this year, and although 
here but for a brief time she made many warm friends 
who regret her departure. 

The regular weekly prayer meeting was held on Tues- 
day instead of Wednesday evening, that an opportunity 
might be given to Dr. McClure for addressing the young 
ladies, preparatory to the communion Sabbath. 

The young ladies of the economics class were allowed 
the privilege of attending chapel at the College, on Mon- 
day morning, in order to hear Rev. Joseph T. Duryea and 
Rev. Thos. C. Hall in their brief and entertaining talks to 
the students. 

The young ladies assembled in the chapel Friday even- 
ing directly after tea, to listen to a very interesting and 
charming paper prepared and presented by Miss Norton. 
Her subject of discourse was the "Parisian's Idea of 
Manners," in which she highly commended the gentle, 
thoughtful woman. 

The Senior Club held its regular meeting Thursday 
evening in the Athenaeum Hall. After the literary pro- 
garm was carried on, several interesting charades helped 
to make time pass pleasantly. The success of the meeting 
was due to the efforts of the committee, Miss Somerville 
and Messrs. Drake and Goodman. 



The new University pin has met with decdied approval 
at the Seminary and all are anxiously awaiting the time 
when each one possesses a badge of her own. 

Mr. Holt has very kindly offered to award medals to 
the young ladies of the Zeta Sigma and Kappi Phi Societies. 
The contest will take place some time next terra and will 
be between the essayists, elocutionists, vocalists and 
debaters of the two societies. This is a very generous 
offer and we greatlj' appreciate it. 

One evening last week, unfortunately for her friends. 

Miss received through the "mail" a banjo, 

"slightly disfigured but still in the ring." One has only 
to walk up and down the first corridor but once and she 
thinks herself again in Midway and her thoughts are 
those of immediate escape. 

The young ladies at Mrs. Seeley's table celebrated her 
birthday Tuesday evening. The table was prettily decor- 
ated with smilax and marguerites. The menu was of a 
character which is always allowable on the occasion of a 
birthday, Monday evening the young ladies at Miss 
Ripley's table did honor to her birthday in the same 
charming manner. 

The Kappi Phi called a special meeting Wednesday 
evening, for the purpose of making more definite arrange- 
ments for the coming contests. Various committees were 
appointed to take charge of this, and a society feeling 
heretofore unknown in our meetings, was manifested by 
all and gave promise of far greater enthusiasm in the 
future. Although this is our first attempt in the line of 
contests, and time for preparation brief, we intend to 
make them both interesting and helpful, also instrumental 
in awakening a spirit of activity among the members of 
this organization. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEMY. 

Judson Williams is around again after a few days 
illness with the quinsy. 

R. 0. Stoops is attending the convention of Student 
Volunteer Movement at Detroit, Mich. 

The Seniors, according to a recent action of the faculty, 
are to be excused from delivering commencement orations. 

Only a couple of hundred volumes are necessary to 
make our library one of a thousand volumes. To the six 
hundred that we ourselves have amassed, two hundred 
have been lately added from the University library. 

Regardless of preliminary contests Tri Kappa will be 
represented in the grand finale by Mr. Cooke and Mr. 
I>oughlin in declamation, by Mr. Stoops in debate, and 
by Mr. Cutler in essay. The recent preliminary contests 
and their results have indicated a different array of cham- 
pions, but this is not the final decision of the society. 

Perhaps it would not be amiss to once more urge on 
the faculty to the practice of chapel talks which has 
obtained so great favor in the college, both in the 
faculty and among the student. Principal Smith has set 
a well-enjoyed example. We should like to hear discourses 
on any subject well studied and especially upon those 
subjects that pertain to that branch of study which the 
professor teaches. 



10 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



The students both of the dormitory and the Annie 
Durand College have lately taken a very great liking to 
chess. Maybe the organization of a chess club inspired 
the fever — for it is a fever. At various rooms of either 
building, one may see many groups sitting in silent ex- 
citement, each gamester scratching the back of his head 
in profound perplexity or gazing ruefully upon a healthy 
collection of chessmen which his opponent has removed 
from the field of battle. 

Mr. Charles Holt, who annually gives to the Academy 
literary societies four medals, and to the society gaining 
the highest average in the contest a banquet, not long 
ago. in a letter to Principal Smith, laid down these pro- 
visions, which shall henceforth govern the final meet. 
Each declamation must not be of more than twelve minutes 
duration; the essayist must confine his reading to the 
space of ten minutes; and each debater will be allowed 
twenty minutes for his entire exposition. Of course each 
essay may be submitted to the judges on thought as long 
as the writer may wish to have it, but his appearance 
before the audience must be of only ten minutes duration. 
The joint committee of the two societies has decided that 
the contest shall be held in the Reid Hall auditorium. 



THE ATHLETIC FIELD. 

In the last number of The University Magazine the 
athletic editor, S. Scoville, Jr., had an article in defense 
of the athletic teams generally known as the "Mott Haven 
teams." This article shows the advantage of general 
athletics over football, baseball and rowing. For while 
a man, unless he has had previous drill, gets none of 
the advantages of training for the latter mentioned 
teams, in track athletics any man can take part and 
receive the benefits of the training. The article is one 
of the best that has appeared in any of the magazines 
of late and should be read by every one, whether active 
in athletics or not. 

" During the winter, Mr. Stagg, athletic director of the 
Chicago University, has had the football team play several 
indoor games, and in a recent article in a Chicago paper 
he stated his intention of keeping the football team in 
training all the year. This course of Mr. Stagg's has 
been questioned a good deal and it is doubted by many 
whether it will help either the men or the game. We as a 
college should take an interest in the question and stamp 
it with our approval or disapproval. If it is a good 
scheme we should not be behind in adopting it. but if it 
is not good we should use our influence against it. One 
argument against it is that it is liable to run the game 
"into the ground" as has been done with baseball. Then 
the expenses which are necessary to maintain a football 
team are such that they cannot be met unless the games 
are well attended. There are several arguments from the 
point of view of training against playing football the 
whole year round. The principle ones are that a man, 
no matter how strong he is, is not able to keep up the 
rigorous training necessary, without doing himself an 
injury. As college athletics are arranged at present, a 
man has an opportunity to take part in almost every 
branch of sports and as a result is likely to become a 
better all-round developed man than if he devoted his 
time entirely to one game. Furthermore, football being 
a more exciting game, will take way the interest from 



the other branches of athletics, which are most excellent 
in themselves but do not draw forth such applause for 
those who take part in them. 

Of late several small pieces of apparatus in the gym- 
nasium have been broken by being hit by baseballs. It is 
almost absolutely necessary that the baseball team get 
this practice, but it seems too bad that the gymnasium 
should suffer as a consequence. Furthermore, those who 
are not candidates for baseball but who wish to take some 
exercise, find it almost impossible to do so on account of 
the baseballs which are flying about in every direction. 
We would suggest as a remedy that the University, when 
its "ship comes in," put up a building somewhere near 
the athletic field with large enough floor space for a base- 
ball cage. 

The Board of Directors of the Athletic Association 
wish to call the attention of the students to the wretched 
condition of the baseball field. It is quite evident that if 
anything is to be done the students must do it. A com- 
mittee has been appointed for the purpose of taking the 
matter in charge, but the co-operation of every one is 
necessary in order that the work of leveling the field may 
be accomplished. Let all those who are willing to devote 
their energies to this worthy cause signify such intentions 
by handing their names to one of the committee. 

Henry Goodman, Chairman. 

D. H. Jackson, 

L. Gili.eland. 



DIRECTORS' MEETING. 

At the last meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
Athletic Association, the report of J. II. Jones, business 
manager of the athletic entertainment, was accepted. A 
vote of thanks was extended to the young ladies who 
assisted in the play. "Which is Which:" also to Mr. 
Goodman and the rest of the committee and assistants. 
The committee on the gymnasium exhibition was given 
full power to make all necessary arrangements for the 
meeting. H. B. Craigen was appointed business manager. 

A committee of two, D. Fales and A. O. Jackson, was 
appointed to find out the cost of putting lockers in the 
gymnasium, secure funds and put in the same as rapidly 
as posisble. The necessity of improving the baseball field 
received full discussion, and H. Goodman, L. H. Gilleland 
and D. H. Jackson were appointed to devise practical 
plans for improvement. 

A communication from the president of the W. I. C. 
A. A. was read and motion carried that Lake Forest be 
represented by one delegate at the meeting to be held in 
St. Louis March 15. Wji. U. Hai.bekt, 

Secretary. 



THINK OF IT 

4 • POS-TIV-LY - 12 

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equal to TWELVE WEEKS by the old style. Positions 
guaranteed under certain conditions. Our "free" 56 and 80-page 
catalogues will explain "all." Send for them — Draughtons Bus- 
iness College and School of Shorthand and Telegraphy, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. CHEAP BOARD- No vacation. Enter any 
time. Address, J. F. Draughton, Pres't, Nashville, Tenn. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



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POPPIES 

ihirley, 

Brilliant, 
Tulip, 

Orientale. 

Over 1500 Plants 

For 30 Cts. 

See Tick's Flo- 
ral Guide. 



rc7- 



The Pioneer Catalogue c f Vege- 
tables and Flowers. 
Contains J 12 pages Sx/o'/i 
inches, with descriptions 
that describe, not mislead: 
illustrations that instruct, 
not exaggerate. 

lis cover is charming in 
harmonious Mending of w a- 
tercolor prints in preen and 
white, with a gold back- 
ground,— a dream of beauty. 
32 pages of Novelties printed in 
8 different colors. Allthelead- 
lngnovelties and the lest of the 
old varieties. These hard times 
you cannnt afford to run anv 
risk. Buy Honest Gooils 
where you Mill receive Full 
Measure. It isnot necessarv 
to advertise that Ticks' seed's 
grow, this is known thewoild 
over, and also that the harvest 
Pays. A very little spent for 
proper seed will save grocer's 
and doctor's hills. " Mam- 
concede Vick's Florui Guide 
the handsomest catalogue 
for 1S!14. If yon love a line 



' , ., ioriK». It von love a tine 

garden send address now. with 10 cents, which may be 
deducted from hrstorder. $360 Cash Prizes for Potatoes 

Rochester, N.Y. JAMES VICK'S SONS. 

Weban's Livery . . . 

Is the best place for Rigs and 
Sleighs. Lake Forest, 111. 



C^hicaqo College 

- DENTAL SURGERY 

MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 

4 4 4 4 4 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean. 

96 STATE STREET. 



T 



HE GLOBE LIGHT and HEAT CO. 

Makers of the Celebrated 

GLOBE GAS MACHINES. 



We always keep on hand a full line of Supplies for our Gas Machines 

52 „ nd 54 LAKE STREET, CHICAGO. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Mrs. A, Williams, 

"Restaurant ano 
' ^Cboicc Confectionery 

ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS 
MADE TO ORDER ^^aana^" 

choice confectionery a specialty. 

Lake Forest, III. 



F. BARSTOW, 



Cement 
Sidewalks 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 

THOMAS F. HOWE. 

PRACTICAL 

Plumber . and . Gasfiitter 

SANITARY WORK 
A SPECIALTY. 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS, 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 



OFFICE NEAR THE 
GENESEE ST. BRIDGE. 



Waukegan, 111. 




FROM CHICAGO 



Lake Forest, 



is. 



•jftorman 3. IRobcxts 



Cental 
Surgeon 



THflauftcoan, 



IFUinoie. 



Variable 
Route 

Tourist tickets 
allowing privi- 
leges never be- 
fore accorded, 
can be obtained 
with full infor- 
mation, upon 
application to 
any ticket 
agent, or to the 
General Pass- 
enger Agent, 
CHICAGO. 



All meals served 
in Dining Cars. 

Palace Drawing- 
Room Sleeping Cars 
and Tourist Sleepers 
are run through te 
San Francisco 
without change, 
leaving Chicago 
^ daily via the 

North-Western Line 

CHICAGO 4 NORTH-WESTERN RY. 



,JBOTT&C0. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERALS 

ARTISTS' MATERIAL 
MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS 
ART NOVELTIES 
STUDIES FOR COPYING 



Robert Mercer, 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

CIGARS 

TOBACCO 

PIPES and 

STATIONERY 

AGENT FOR ALL 
CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



J. Q. CORNISH, 

DEALER IN 

♦ FINE ♦ CARRIAGES + PHAETONS ♦ 

Top Buggies, Road Carts. 

AND MANUFACTURER OF 

SUPERIOR GRADE OF HARNESS. 

Waukegan, 111. 



Fred Palmer . . . 

Manufacturer and dealer in 

CARRIAGE, TRIMMINGS, 
BLANKETS, Etc. 



HARNESS 



Repairing Promptly 
Done 
Waukegan, 111. 



"Seeing is Believing." 




Simple, Beautiful, Good — 
these words mean much, but to 
see "The Rochester" will impress 
the truth more forcibly. Its mar- 
velous light is purer and brighter 
than gas light, softer than electric 
light, and more cheerful than either. The 
choicest bric-a-brac in the palace of a Van- 
derbilt reveals nothing finer. We have 2,700 
artistic varieties, in brass, bronze, silver and black iron. 

Ladies often like to go down among the large wholesale houses and buy of 
first hands. They will find at our salesrooms (the largest in tile World) 
a rare collection of Art in lamps. A catalogue to send you if you cannot come. 
THE ROCHESTER IAJIP CO., 

42 Park Place, I „ _ Y ork Cltv 
f t J * 37 Rarclay St., ( wew * orK c,ly * 

w^'The Rochester." 




hmmjj 



M|CAvLAIoJnftUtWIARKs3r 
^ COPYRIGHTS. ^ 

CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
Il T NN iSs CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific Ainerirnn. and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work In the 
world. S3 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition monthly, 82.50 a year. Single 
copies, *i-5 cents. Every number contains beau- 
tiful plates, in colors, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MtJNN & CO., New York, 361 Broadway 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 



Rush 



Medical 
College 



Medical Department of the 
Lake Forest University . . 



FACULTY: 



DeLASKIE MILLER, M. D., PH.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Children. 



NORMAN BRIDGE, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of CliDical Medicine and Physical Diagnosis. 



EPHRAIM INGALS, A. M., M. D., PH.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Materia Mediea 

and Medical Jurisprudence. 

DANIEL T. NELSON, A. M., M. D, 
Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 



ARTHUR DEANE BEVAN, M. D. 
Professor of Anatomy. Descriptive and Surgical. 



NICHOLAS SENN, M. D., PH. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 



EDWARD L. HOLMES, A. M., M. D.. President. 
Professor of Diseases of the Eve and Ear. 

HENRY M. SYMAN, NA. M.. M. D.,, Treasurer. 

Professor of the Principles and Practice 

of Medicine. 

JAMES H. ETHER1DGE. A. M., M. D., Secretary. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

WALTER S. HAINES, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy 

and Toxocology. 



JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery 

and Clinical Surgery. 



E. FLETCHER INGALS, A. M., M. 
Professor of Laryngology and 
Practice of Medicine. 



DANIEL R. BROWER, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, 

Materia Mediea and Therapeutics. 



JAMES NEVINS HYDE. A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Skn and Venereal Diseases. 



JOHN M. DODSON, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of Physiology. 



The regular session of lectures beging about the last of September, annually, and continues 
eight months. For particulars as to course of instructions, conditions of graduation, fees, etc., 
address the Secretary, 

DR. J. H. ETHERIDGE, 

1634 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



W. B. BLACKMAN & BRO., 



Shirt . Makers . and 




Hen's . Furnishings 



TACOMA BUILDING 



151 MADISON ST. 



CHICAGO 



W.J. ROOT h, ghart 

♦ ♦ • flSbotograpber 

Kimball Hall, 243 Wabash Av. 
Chicago 

MEDAL AWARDED AT WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION 
Ink, Pastel, and Crayon Portraits. 

Sepia my specialty. 

E. R. Hartin, Artigt 

....... Photographer 

78 State Street 

■ Kranz Building 

Take Elevator. Chicago. 



CSend SI. 25, #2.00 or S3. 50 for a 
* I I I sample retail box by express, of the 

/ I 1/ best candies in America, put up in 

I V. f elag ar| t boxes, and strictly pure. 

J Suitable for presents. Express 

charges paid east of Denver. Refers to 
all Chicago. Try it once. Address 

C.F.GUNTHER. Confectioner 

212 STATE STREET 
CHICAGO 




(Biles Bros. 

.Diamond . 
fIDcrcbants 

Webbing . anb . presentation 

. (Boobs . 

AT SACRIFICE PRICES 

tfiiat jflooi, fiDasonic (Temple 



MARLINS 



Made la all styles and sizes. Lightest, 

strongest, easiest working, safest, simplest, 

I most accurate, most compact, and most 

modern. For sale by all dealers in arms. 

Catalogues mailed free by 

The Marlin Fire Arms Co.. 

New Haven, Conn., TJ. S. A. 



TRIFLES 



The celebrated Poser, 

D.R.Coover, - - 

the Photographer 

7o State Street, - - - Bay State Building 

Formerly of Harrison & Coover 

Special rates to students. 



O'XT TT^'plVrT^ Presenting this ad. will be allowed TEN PER CENT 



discount at 



The Model Clothing House 

Temperance Temple, Washington St., Waukegan 

1 ilC IVlOQel makes a specialty of Tailor-made Clothing, Stylish Hats and 
Furnishing Goods, and on account having less than one-twentieth part of the expense of any 
Chicago House, sell same quality of goods much cheaper. 

" Verbum Sat Safiienti." 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



Chicago College of Law 

THE LAW DEPARTMENT OF LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

Faculty: 



Hon. JOSEPH M. BAILEY, LL.D., 

Late Chief Justice of Supreme Court 
of Illinois 



Hon. THOMAS A. MORAN, LL.B. 

Late Justice of Appellate Court 
First District of Illinois. 



Hon. H. M. SHEPARD, 

Justice of Appellate Court, First District of Illinois. 

AND OTHERS. 

♦ . 

The Under- Graduate Course of two years begins the first Monday in September, 

annually, and continues ten months. 

The Post-Graduate Course of one year begins the first Tuesday in October, annually, 

and continues eight months. 

Diplomas granted on two years' attendance, admits to the Bar of State on motion. 

For further information address the Secretary, 

ELMER E. BARRETT, LL.B., 

ROOM 708 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, S. E. Cor. WASHINGTON AND LA SALLE STREETS 

CHICAGO 

University Tailor 




27 Wabash Avenue CRITTENDEN 



Cor. Lake Street 



Students' Suits to Order $25.00 



CHICAGO 



Students' Spring Overcoats, $25.00 



Vol. VII 




LAKE FOREST . . 



UNIVERSITY 



COMPRISES SIX 
DISTINCT SCHOOLS 
AS FOLLOWS: 



At LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



/. LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, for boys 

2. FERRY HALL SEMINARY, for young ladies 

3. LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, co=educatioual 

4. RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 
At CHICAGO, ILL. 5. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY 

6. CHICAGO COLLEGE OF LAW 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY offers four years of work and fits for entrance into all the leading 
colleges. 

FERRY HALL SEMINARY offers four years of college preparatory work and two years of college 
work, besides exceptional facilities in music, etc. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE has been entirely reorganized and now offers four years of under- 
graduate work, one-half of which is made up of required work; one-fourth is given to a 
major subject, and one-fourth is elective. Three years of daily -work are offered in each 
of the following departments: i, Greek: 2, Latin: 3, French: 4, German: 5, English 
6, Biblical Literature: 7, Political and Social Science including History: 8, Philosophy 
9, Mathematics: 10, Astronomy: 11, Chemistry: 12, Physics: 13, Zoology: 14, Botany 
15, Geology. 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS offer the usual courses, leading to the practice of Medicine 
Dental Surgery, and Law. 

For circulars of information concerning any departmtnt of the University, 

Address, Johfl M. Coulter, President Lake Forest University 

Lake Forest, III. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR. 

XLhc jftmoamental Xaw 3Book 



THE one among them all that survives all changes and all opposition is Blackstone's Commentaries. Present Ameri- 
can law is an outgrowth of the laws set forth hy Blackstone in a system and manner that has never been surpassed. 
And so the American law student finds sooner or later that he must familiarize himself with it: of the several 
editions of the classic offered him, that edited by the Hon. Thos. M. Cooley has qualities that cannot be ignored. 
Judge Cooley gives Blackstone's text complete. He has erased the obsolete and irrevalent notes of earlier com- 
mentators, preserving the notes that are valuable to the American. To these he has added a large body of notes bearing on 
the constitution and laws of the United States, drawn from his long study of American constitutional law: his career as 
eacher and expounder of the law increased his qualifications for this important task. Besides these notes, he has supple- 
mented the work by several valuable essays, greatly enhancing its value. The first of these makes the reader, in large meas- 
ure, a student under Judge Cooley. They comprise: "Suggestion for the Study of the Law," "Editor's Review," "Local 
Government in Great Britain." "British Colonial System," "Local Government in the United States," "Territories of the 
United States: 

THESE FEW SIGNIFICANT SENTENCES FROM JUDGE COOLEY' S WORK 
SHOULD BE READ BY EVERY LAW STUDENT: 

'And so it happens that while year by year, hundreds of superficial workers are preparing themselves to glean in the 
fields 'of legal controversy, the true laborers in that field, the men who are to reap its substantial harvests, and bear away it 
tempting prizes, do not spare themselves the labor of acquiring an intimate acquaintance with the works of this great jurist, 
nor fail to explore the abunda it stores of legal learning to which he gives us such agreeable introduction. 

" Nor. although there are many things in Blackstone which have ceased to be important in the practical administration 
of the law, can we, with prudence or propriety, omit to make ourselves acquainted with them. Things which are abolished 
or obsolete may nevertheless have furn'shed the reasons for the things which remain and to study rules while ignoring their 
reasons would be like studying the animal anatomy, while ignoring the principles of life which animated it. And it is notice- 
able also that though in England, where the common law and the statutes ment ioned by this author have been so greatly 
changed by recent legislation, * * * in America, where many of these changes have never been made, and where much- 
of the recent English legislation has no importance, even by way of explanation or illustration, the original work of Black- 
stone is much the. most useful, as t resenting us the law in something near the condition in which our ancestors brought it to 
America, leaving us i.o trace in our statutes and decisions its consequent cnanges here, unembarrassed by irrevalent informa- 
tion about parliamentary legislation which in no way concerns up." 



COOLEY'S BLACKSTONE. 



THIRD EDITION. 
REVISED AND ENLARGED. 



Two Volumes, Octavo, Price to Students, $9.50, Prepaid on Receipt of Price. 

CALLAGHAN & CO., 114 Monroe St., Chicago. 



' ' Takes 

First 

Place." 

The Name 
Stands for just 
What it is. 
THE BEST BICYCLE BUILT FOR $125. 

Catalogue 

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trade Mark is a guarantee that the goods are the best. Complete Illus- 
trated Catalogue ready. Sent free. 



Dr. Geo. Doerbecker, 

Dentist 

Graduate of Pennsylvania College 
of Dental Surgery, Philadelphia. 

Office; 134 Washington Street 

Opposite 1st National Bank, 

WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS. 




TOMASO 

MANDOLIN 

ORCHESTRA 

AND 

MANDOLIN SCHOOL. 

21 CENTRAL MUSIC HALL, 

CHICAGO. 

Skat i no; Is enjoyed by alL 



But to see the new College Stationery which 

we have just received is to buy it. 

Come around and look it over. 

Ruled or unruled, any way you want it. 

Envelopes to match. 

Pads containg 100 sheets, 25 cents. 

25 Envelopes. 10 cents. 

RICE BROS. 



The University Stentor. 



Vol. VII 



TUESDAY, MARCH H, 1894 



No. 19 



THE FUTURE OF L. F. LI. 



SOME INTELLIGENT REMARKS BY AN INTELLIGENT 
OI5SERVER. 

A Chicago gentleman, prominent in professional and 
business circles, whose name we are not at liberty to 
divulge, in a recent conversation with the editor of The 
Stextor gave expression to a number of practical ideas 
regarding the future of our University, which we publish 
in the hope that they will arouse the interest of those 
having its welfare in charge. While some of his deduc- 
tions may be incorrect, his general spirit is certainly 
commendable. The gentleman in question, it may be 
well to add, has always been a warm friend of Lake 
Forest, and is well informed as to its history. Speaking- 
first of the field which the University occupies he said: 

"The possibilities of this great Northwest are as yet 
scarcely realized. It has resources capable of supporting 
many times its present population. Just as a few years 
ago men did not dream of what the future had in store 
for Chicago, so we do not now comprehend what will be 
the future development of Illinois, Iowa and the North- 
west. Why, not so very long ago there was one wooden 
school house in Chicago. When the necessitj- of erecting 
a larger building was urged upon the School Board they 
replied that the present facilities were ample, and that 
there would never be children enough in the city to fill a 
building sixty by eighty feet, three stories high, the size 
contemplated. Now there are hundreds of thousands of 
school children in the city. 

"Lake Forest can draw from the whole of this vast 
territory of which Chicago is the center. The town itself 
is an ideal spot for an institution of learning. In this 
respect you have a great advantage over Chicago Univer- 
sity, but both the latter and your other near neighbor. 
Northwestern, draw from a different class of people than 
Lake Forest University, which being a Presbyterian 
institution appeals directly to people of that denomination. 
It is no doubt true that the Presbyterians are the wealth- 
iest among Protestant churches. The city of Chicago is 
no exception to this rule, and it should be the work of 
Lake Forest's trustees and friends to divert some of this 
wealth into buildings and equipments at Lake Forest. 

"AX EXAMPLE 

of what can be accomplished by energy and push, supple- 
mented by careful and progressive management, is seen in 



one of the noted professional schools of Chicago, with 
which I happen to be familiar. It was started only 
twelve years ago, but today it is universally recognized 
as standing first among its class. It has been very far 
from possessing an abundance of funds during its period 
of growth: nevertheless it has overtaken and surpassed 
schools five times as old. Its success, I take it, is large]}- 
due to the fact its promoters have kept -out of the rut,' 
for it does not do to -let well enough alone' — well enough 
must be made better. 

"To apply this to Lake Forest. The trustees see to it 
that everything is moving along in the usual course: they 
vote the interest from the endowment to the accustomed 
uses, and then go home to rest with an easy conscience 
until their next meeting. Now the men composing the 
board are all of them estimable gentlemen and able busi- 
ness men," but have they built up their important business 
interests in the way in which they seek to build up a great 
university'.' From my observation 1 should unhesitatingly 
answer no. 

BUSINESS PRIXC1PLKS. 

"But a university should be run on strict business 
principles. The professors can attend to the intellectual 
part of the curriculum, as they have so wisely done at 
Lake Forest, but I affirm that a school is as much of a 
commercial enterprise as is a newspaper plant or a whole- 
sale trade. These aforementioned gentlemen know that 
the only way to make a business successful is to drive it. 
to force every department up to its full limit, and to keep 
enlarging and reaching out for new markets; this too 
with a ceaseless attention to details and an eye watchful 
for undeveloped possibilities of improvement. How else 
could Armour or Field have reached their present positions 
in the business world'.' Lake Forest, while she is doing a 
noble work, is not coming up to her possibilities. Her 
trustees make an occasional spurt, as when they put up 
the new Academy buildings but the effort is not main- 
tained at the high-pressure mark. 

"For president you have an able and enthusiastic 
educator. Under his management the possibilities of the 
University are boundless. But he must have material 
resources, he must be provided with more money, and it 
seems to me that the trustees are the men to get it. 
Sudents will increase with increased equipment. 

A FALSE IDEA. 

"Now I have an idea that many of the good people 
resident in Lake Forest are perfectly satisfied with their 
present surroundings. They live in a beautiful little 
town, and they would really prefer that the under-graduate 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



students should not increase materially. This feeling of 
apathy, or rather antipathy, 1 am afraid affects the 
trustees, to a certain extent at least. If this is true it 
reveals a deplorable condition of affairs, and I mention it 
merely that it may be guarded against as men would 
guard against a plague. 

"The element of time is no longer of prime importance 
in the growth of a university. More important is a skill- 
ful command of resources. An able faculty, a complete 
equipment and a large endowment are far more influential 
than a record of thirty or forty years of somewhat 
moribund existence. 

THE FUTURE. 

" You ought to have two thousand students out at Lake 
Forest. Your professional schools are doing very well, but 
L. F. U. as a whole, under proper conditions, could 
readily treble its present attendance. Given active, 
earnest, continuous effort along the lines which I have 
mentioned and I forsee for Lake Forest a glorious future. 
Just as I have faith in our great city by the lake, so I 
have faith that Lake Forest University may become one 
of the nation's greatest institutions of learning. Such a 
result I heartily desire to see accomplished. " 

And in this wish the listener gladly joined. 

H. L. Bird. 



THE BOYS' CLUB. 

The organization commonly known as the Boys' Club 
has a much broader scope than its name implies. The 
origin of the present body was a reading club of boys, 
organized over two years ago. The success of the meetings 
of this club, which were held once a week, warranted the 
enlargement of its facilities, and the next winter, games, 
books, magazines, and a gymnastics class were added; 
since then more commodious quarters have been secured, 
new classes formed, departments for a young ladies' club, 
for an older boys' club, and for a girls' club have been 
instituted, and the accommodations and privileges have 
increased in number and worth, so that today the old 
name, "Boys' Club." is not only not comprehensive, but is 
apt to mislead those not familiar with the club. It is 
not a club for boys only, nor is it so much a club as an 
institute. 

Originally it was a "boys' club," started by Miss Curry 
in January, 1802. The plan was so heartily entered into 
by the boys that by the end of the second winter, 1802-93, 
the council chamber had become too small and cramped. 
There was not room for all the members at once, and a 
division into sections was impracticable because the council 
chamber could not be obtained for other nights. Arrange- 
ments were finally made, however, which secured two 
rooms in the old hotel building, furnished, and rooms 
which could be open every evening. 

On the 20th of November, 1803, the club met in its 
new quarters for the first time. The original membership 



was divided, the older boys having the rooms at their dis- 
posal all nights in the week except Friday and Saturday, 
when the younger boys took their turn. A constitution 
was drawn up and each division elected officers. Leonard 
Double was elected president of the younger boys. The 
dues per month as fixed were: For the older boys, ten 
cents; for the younger boys, five cents. These dues are 
always promptly paid in a way that would put many a 
college student to shame. A boy who has signed the 
constitution and paid his dues becomes a member. 

The rooms are arranged and furnished in a way cal- 
culated to give enjoyment to any boy. If he is studious 
and fond of reading, he can draw books from the circu- 
lating library, which is well stocked with works of the 
best authors. If the boy is energetic and wants more 
active amusement, he has games of all kinds at his dis- 
posal; dominoes, bean bags, and checkers, games of 
ancient time, and games of the latest invention, all are 
among those from which he can choose. There are possibly 
toys whom no kind of game can amuse; for these are 
provided illustrated periodicals and papers. The rooms 
are very attractive and on Friday evenings hold a very 
merry companj'. 

Although the rooms are prepared for the instruction 
and amusement of boys especially, and the club originally 
started for boys, they are by no means the only ones who 
are benefited. Soon after the opening of the new rooms 
several new improvements were introduced. A young 
ladies' club was organized, meeting every Monday night. 
A girls' club, for girls under sixteen years, meets every 
\Vednesda3 7 afternoon. As the interest grew, the scope of 
the club increased. Several classes were formed. The 
old gymnastics class, which continued under the charge 
of F. A. Hayner, was augmented by a company in military 
drill, which has recently been provided with guns. This 
class, directed by H. I!. Cragin, meets with the gymnastics 
class every Tuesday evening at Healy's Hall. Thursday 
evening is taken up by the class in mechanical drawing, 
which is taught by Marvyn Scudder, a graduate of the 
Chicago Manual Training School. One of the most popular 
classes meets Wednesday evening, under the direction of 
J. ji. Jones. This is a class in bookkeeping, to which 
several members of the young ladies' club belong. Any 
one who is willing- to do the work may join these classes. 
The only charges are an entrance fee of twenty -five cents. 
The course in each runs ten weeks, or until May 1. 1804. 
The first five evenings being taken up separately by 
the various departments, the last, Saturday, evening is 
devoted to a union meeting and an entertainemnt for all 
members, their friends and relatives, and whoever may 
wish to come. Indeed the Saturday evening meeting is 
public, and every one is welcome there. It usually begins 
with music of some kind, followed by a lecture or talk on 
some practical subject, designed especially for boys, but 
none the less interesting- for older people. Dr. McClure 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



ave a talk one evening on "Alaska," Dr. Seeley on 
"Germany," Dr. Coulter on the " Yellowstone Park," Prof. 
Stevens has given lectures on "Physics." Stereopticon 
views are often presented. One Saturday Lieutenant 
Wood, of the U. S. navy, spoke on "School Ships." Many 
other addresses, equally interesting, have been given the 
boys. 

With one addition atfer another, with changes and 
improvements, the Boys' Club has come to be a collection 
of clubs. It has grown and nourished steadily, and its 
hopes grow with it. It is an institution which cannot be 
too highly estimated. It was started in the moment of 
opportunity, and therefore cannot fail to accomplish its 
purpose and to become finally what it w£S intended to 
become — a place of amusement and instruction for all who 
will come. 



ATHLETICS. 

The War Department at Washington, after long and 
mature deliberation, have finally decided to prohibit 
Annapolis and West Point from playiny football with each 
other. 

The committee which was appointed to see about 
fixing the athletic field have been getting estimates on the 
cost. The trustees have promised to co-operate with the 
students in getting the field in shape. 

A meeting of the W. I. G. A. A. is to be held in St. 
Louis on March 15 to draw up and adopt a constitution 
for the association in place of the old one which was lost. 
Mr. Sharon, of St. Louis, will represent Lake Forest. 

The committee appointed by the athletic board to look 
up the matter of getting lockers have been "hustling" and 
have already raised considerable money by subscription. 
They have received several bids for making the lockers, 
but nothing definite can be done until the money is all 
raised. 

The baseball management has about decided not to 
let the team take a trip, but several big games have been 
arranged for, so that there will be plenty of incentive for 
working hard. The work in the gymnasium is kept up 
and if good weather keeps on the men will begin outdoor 
work soon. 

On the last couple ot runs of the Hare and Hounds not 
more than a dozen men have gone along and a good many 
of these have been younger members of the Academy. 
Every one in school should care enough for his health 
to embrace such an opportunity for outdoor exercise, and 
those who expect to take part in spring athletics should 
take this opportunity of getting in trim. 



Chicago and Evanston have made all arrangements for 
an indoor athletic meet, to be held at Tattersal's some 
time about the first of April. 

If the Academy students keep on as they have com- 
menced they ought to take their share of prizes on field 
day. They intend to get up a field day of their own this 
year, and from the winner's pick a team to represent 
them in the Varsity field day. It used to be that the 
Academy carried off the majority of the prizes on field 
day, but in the last two years interset seems to have died 
out, and as a result the Academy has taken second place. 



TOWN TOPICS. 

Blair lodge has been rented for one year to Mr. Cyrus 
McCormick, Jr. 

The waiting rooms of the station are being cleaned 
and calcimined. 

Prof. Ilalsey delivered a paper on the "Elizabethan 
Drama" befoie the Art Institute Tuedsay evening, which 
met at Dr. McClure's. 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Durand and Miss Harriet Durand 
returned last Wednesday noon from their six weeks visit 
in California and at the Midwinter Pair. 

Mr. Fitz-Hugh comes to Lake Forest frequently to 
examine the work on his new house. It will be finished 
May 1, but Mr. and Mrs. Fitz-Hugh will come to Lake 
Forest some weeks earlier. 

Healy's Hall was literally jammed last Friday evening 
with an enthusiastic audience to listen to a performance 
by the pupils of the public schools, comprising recitations, 
songs and a flower cantata. The entertainment was a 
great success, and about $70 was netted for the purchase 
of a school library. The inadequacy of Healy's Hall to 
all the uses of Lake Forest was abundantly proved. Is 
there not some way to get a public hall seating six or 
seven hundred? 

The annual union praise meeting of the Lake Forest 
Foreign Missionary Sociteies was held in the church 
chapel. Sunday atfernoon. Mrs. Halsey, president of the 
Woman's Missionary Society, presided, assisted by repre- 
sentatives of the other societies. The I'niversit}' Glee 
Club and the Ferry Hall Sextette each gave one song. 
The first address by Rev. Paul Bergen, a graduate of L. 
F. V., was a description of the many prejudices against 
foreigners in China which had to be overcome. After 
him, Miss Mabel Palmer, of the Ferry Hall Society, read 
a poem — "Patchwork" — followed by an adderss on "School 
Life in Pekin," by Miss Ellen Ward, formerly of Lake 
Forest. Dr. McClure offered the closing prayer. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



Gbc 



Hniversit^ Stentor 

(A Union of The Stentor and The Red and Black). 

ISSUED WEEKLY BY THE LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY STENTOR 
PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



Harry L. Bird, '94, ------ Editor 

David Faxes, Jr.. '96, - Assistant Editor and Town Topics 
\V. B. Hunt, '94, i . , 

A. O. Jackson, '96, \ i.ocais 

Prof. J. J. Halsey, ------ Alumni 

D. H. Jackson, '96, - Athletics 

Chas. Thom, '95, ------ Exchanges 

Miss F. Somervillk, / 
Miss Mabel Palmer. \ 

S. E. Gruexstein. / . , 

B. S. Cutler. [ " " Academy 

A. P. Bourns, '94, - Business Manager 

C. 15. Moore. '95, ----- Advertising- 



Ferry Hall 



TEEMS. 
Teh Year, in advance, 
Single Copies, 



$1.50 
.05 



Advertising Rates on application. 
Address all Communications to the 

Lake Forest University Stentor, 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Entered at the Post Office at Lake Forest, 111 , as second-class matter. 

CLAIMS OF COLLEGE EDITORS. 

The American college paper, as it exists tdoay. is an 
institution peculiar to this country, but we have no hesi- 
tation in saying that it has come to stay. Since it is so 
thoroughly rooted in the student life, it should be the 
aim of college authorities everywhere to encourage the 
college paper and to raise it to a higher plane. One ex- 
cellent method of attaining this end is by a rather more 
generous treatment of their editors. A question which has 
been much discussed in the college press is that of the 
substitution of work done on college papers for a certain 
part of the required course of study. In several schools 
this is done now, the editor in chief being given credit for 
one daily recitation and the assistants for a lesser amount, 
(though the chief editor is usually the only one considered. ) 

There are many reasons why the college journalist 
should be excused from a portion of the regular number 
of recitation hours. Let us briefly notice a few of the 
arguments. He is doing a work for the benefit of the 
institution at large. The most important guide to the 
true inner character of a school is furnished by the 
student publications. Such being the case it is essential 
that the student's paper should be of a high standard of 
merit. Careless or slovenly writing should not be tolera 
ted. Yet the latter it is impossible to avoid when the ed- 
itor in chief is harassed by a multitude of conflicting school 
duties and journalistic demands. Consequently either the 



student's standing or the tone of the paper must suffer. 
Oftentimes an editor feels forced to place the public profit 
before his individual inconvenience, for if he does not he 
soon sees carping criticism freely flung at his hapless 
head. At such times he realizes the utter nothingness of 
the idea which erstwhile possessed his mind of the "glory" 
associated with the editorial toga. 

Again, the number of regularly required hours is well 
calculated to furnish the average student with all the 
"headwork" he is capable of doing, leaving reasonable 
time for recreation and outdoor exercise. The student- 
editor has all the assigned tasks to perform, including 
outside reading, occasional essays and themes, etc. : and 
in addition he must put from fifteen to thirty hours into 
the college paper, taking the time either from recreation, 
study or sleeping hours. More than this, he must bear 
about continually a certain feeling of responsibilit3 7 and 
anxiety. 

Then, too, the literary training acquired in the con- 
duct of a college paper is as beneficial as several studies 
combined: provided, of course, that the work is carefully 
and thoroughly done. The drill in English composition 
alone, not to mention the cultivation of the creative 
powers, is invaluable. Lack of space forbids further 
enlargement of this subject, but enough has been said to 
indicate one side of the college editor's case. We predict 
that ultimately the claims of the aforesaid individual will 
receive more considerate attention than at present. 

The foregoing observations are not written with special 
reference to Lake Forest, as our faculty has never teen 
directly appealed to in this matter, while the trustees 

have always been liberal in their treatment. 

* * 

THE HUSICAL CLUBS. 

Those students composing the three University musical 
clubs deserve a great deal of credit for the hard work 
which they have been doing for the last few weeks. The 
result of their faithful drill will soon be apparent in the 
excellence of their concert programs. It requires a large 
supplj' of partiotism to practice day after day, regardless 
of the wearying monotony. It sometimes happens that 
those who are not members of these organizations are 
not in full sympathy with them and fail to appreciate the 
amount of real, earnest effort which they put forth, and 
that too without hopes of any tangible reward. Without 
doubt the University musicians are entitled to as much 
praise as the University athletic clubs: both in their way 
do much to advertise and build up their alma mater. 
The musical organizations have at least one advantage 
over the athletic teams in that they run no risk of being 
" Waterlooed" by a score of :'i to 0, or something similar. 
But if hard work is the basis of success then the musical 
clubs merit a large measure of good fortune. 

We are gladto present as a supplement this week a 
full page picture of the glee, banjo and mandolin clubs. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



COLLEGE LOCALS. 

There will be no Glee Club concerts before "the trip." 

About one hundred of the new University pins have 
been ordered. 

Mr. F. W. Parish, of Clarinda, la., visited his son, 
Charles, on Monday last. 

On last Friday evening President Coulter addressd the 
Y. M. C. A. of Chicago University. 

Owing to the Junior "auction sale" the Athenaeans 
postponed their regular meeting last week. 

Owing to the Junior "auction sale" the Zeta Epsilon 
Society postponed their regular meeting to Monday evening, 
March 12. 

W. E. Danforth. '91, and C. S. Davies. ! 93, were iu 
Lake Forest last week on the occasion of the Junior party 
at Ferry Hall. 

The Chicago Alumni Association of Lake Forest are 
making arrangements for a banquet with the trustees and 
faculty of the University. 

President Coulter will deliver the address at the 
quarterly convention of Chicago University, which is 
equivalent to our commencement. 

The meeting of the Y. M. C. A. was rendered very 
interesting on Tuesday evening by the talks of those who 
attended the missionary convention at Detroit. 

At the Auditorium on last Thursday evening was held 
the annual Wabash banquet. President Coulter was 
present and responded to the singular toast, "Why and 
Wherefore?" 

The Stentok reporter was very much misinformed in 
regard to the statement which appeared in the last issue 
relative to the sentiment of the faculty in the matter of a 
baseball trip. 

A full report of the Student Volunteer Missionary Con- 
vention recently held at Detroit will be found in the last 
number of The Young Men's Era. the national organ of 
the Y. M. C. A. 

The debate next Friday night between Mr. Mason and 
Mr. Darrow on the tariff question, given by the Athenaean 
Society, will begin at a quarter of eight o'clock in the 
Art Institute. Dr. Coulter will preside. 

The following startlingly literal translation of a few 
lines of Homer was given a few days since by our esteemed 
Greek professor: "The Trojans collecting the bodies shed 
warm tears and piled them on a wagon. 

Mr. L. W. Yaggy, one of the Hoard of Trustees, who 
has been spending the past year in Europe, has cabled 
that he will be home about the first of next month. 



A rumor was quiet generally circulated last week 
that the spring vacation was to be lengthened to ten days, 
and many students were rejoicing in the expectation of 
spending two Sundays at home, liut the secretary of the 
faculty says it is a mistaken report. 

The Seniors will submit orations or essays along the 
line of some one of their studies as a condition of gradua- 
tion. These will not be delivered, however, and the com- 
mencement exercises will probably consist of an address 
by some speaker from abroad, while the class will be 
represented by the valedictorian and salutatorian. 

The annual election of the board of editors of The 
Stentor occurs on Saturday, March 17. at 3:30 o'clock. 
The officers to be elected are editor-in-chief, business 
manager, exchange and one local editor, to be members of 
the Athenaean Society : and advertising agent, athletic, 
alumni, town and one local editor, to be members of the 
Zeta Epsilon Society. 

It is said that one night last week, Doctor Seeley and 
Prof. Eager, becoming tired waiting for some of the 
fellows to have a bonfire, decided to go out and get up a 
little blaze of their own. The Sem's thinking' a crowd of 
fellows weer around, of course got up to see the fun, and 
their surprise may be imagined when the august forms of 
"Doc" and "Prof." were teen flitting about the fire. 

"Sarg" Coolidge, while on the last "hare and hound" 
run. met with a painful accident. ISeing hot on the trail 
of the hares, he decided he would save time by going over 
a gate which happened to be in his way: unfortunately a 
barbed wire was reposing on the top rail. One of his 
fingers got tangled up with a barb in such a manner that 
a considerable part of the member was left on the gate. 
Sarg's figures on the expenses of a hare and hound chase 
are about five dollars for the round trip. 



CHESS CLUB REPORT. 



The foil 


owing 


is 


the 


stand 


ing of 


the Chess 


Club 


members up 


to March 


12: 










Player. 






Played. 


Won 


Lost. 


P. C. 


Whiteford 






3 




3 


ii 


l.i K in 


llalbert 






ii 




!) 


ii 


1.000 


Smith 






:i 




S 


1 


.S88 


Dudley 






8 




4 


2 


.lilili 


Cooleidge 






!l 




6 


3 


.liiii'i 


Ritchie 






6 




4 


2 


.666 


Graff 






!l 




."> ' 


3', 


.(ill 


Carver 






3 




1 





.333 


Coulter 






H 




3 


(i 


.333 


McKinnie 






(J 







4 


.333 


Hunt 






12 




o 


111 


.166 


Timberlake 






!l 




i-": 


8Ja 


.0.-..") 


Vincent 






:i 







'.i 


. 000 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



FERRY HALL. 

Annie Lord was visited by her sister, on Friday. 

Miss Alleyne Mcintosh spent Saturday and Sunday in 
the city, the guest of her room mate. Miss Harrin. 

Miss Lena Kennedy, a Ferry Hall student in '93, made 
■e short call at the Seminary on Friday afternoon. 

Invitations are out to a musicale. to be given in 
honor of the Athanaeans, at the home of Miss Wood, on 
Tuesday evening, March 13. As next week is to be a very 
busy one, Dr. Seeley did not think it advisable for the 
young ladies to accept this invitation, but Miss Wood has 
kindly offered to postpone the event until. April .">, on 
which evening we will be allowed to go. The young 
gentlemen, thinking to get even with Dr. Seeley for the 
seeming cruelty mentioned above, made vast preparations 
for an immense bonfire to be had Thursday evening. All 
was in readiness and they were awaiting for the signal to 
set on fire the numerous barrels, when Doctor appeared on 
the scene and nipped their plans in the bud. For an hour 
the lantern in the hand of the pursuer rose and fell upon 
the campus like a will-o-the-wisp. but it did its work well 
and brought to light many, many things. The trees 
groaned beneath their weight, as some timid youth made 
a bold scramble up them to avoid faithful "Duke" and his 
master. After all was quiet the young gentlemen returned 
to their homes, with hands and faces bruised, hair dis- 
heveled, clothing torn, and they only knew what else. 

The Kappi Phi Society held its last meeting Wednes- 
day afternoon. A very interesting- program was carried 
out, the special features of which were the comedetta by 
Misses Pride and Marder, and the poem by Miss Blair, 
which was dedicated to one of her classmates. The officers 
for the next term are as follows: President, Miss Somer- 
ville: vice president, Miss Miller; secretary, MissCoulter: 
critic, Miss Pride. 

The preliminary contests will take place between the 
two societies next week. There will be four, two in 
musical and two in literary work. They will be on Tues- 
day, Thursday and Friday evenings, and on Wednesday 
afternoon. For full particulars see next week's issue of 
this paper. 

On Friday evening. March 9, the Ferry Hall parlors 
were the scene of a gay and brilliant company, the 
occasion being the annual party given by the Juniors in 
honor of the Seniors. The decorations were in the class 
colors, green and white, and with its flower, the white 
carnation. Everything presented a very charming appear- 
ance, but the most inviting spot was that of the library 
where dainty cakes and ices were served in a most 
delightful manner. The fore part of the evening was 
passed in guessing, by asking questions which could be 



answered by yes or no, the name of the person which was 
written on a card and pinned on the guesser's back. 
Many persons of distinction and renown were well repre- 
sented, but among the many famous names we were 
pleased to find some with whom we felt acquainted. 
Senator Fry and .lulian Matthews, for instance. Later in 
the evening an auction sale took place, at which rare and 
unique articles were sold for almost nothing, and many 
could be had simply for the asking. It was a very pleas- 
ing and novel way of entertaining the guests, and all were 
profuse in their praises of its success. The Juniors deserve 
great credit for this grand event, and we trust that when 
they pose, next year, as the dignified Seniors of '95, they 
will be honored in as charming a manner as were the 
Seniors of '94. 

On Wednesday the last essa3's of the term were read 
before a committee of the faculty. The past week, which 
they have spent in preparation, has been a great strain 
upon their nervous (?) system, and they have certainly 
borne the test well. 

Dr. Seeley kindly consented to chaperone a party of 
nine girls to see "Faust" Monday evening. The girls all 
tell us that a more delightful chaperone could not have 
been found. 



LAKE FOREST ACADEHY. 

Mrs. Smith was visited by her mother last week. 

Messrs. A. A. Cobb and J. W. Ilubachek are still on 
the sick list. 

The Seniors are still feeling rather happy about the 
demise of the orations. 

Ireland has just recovered from a period of sickness 
and will go home in a day or two. 

The joint committee of the two societies, which is 
making the arrangements for the coming contest, has 
selected the following question for the contest debate: 
"Resolved, That the existing Chinese laws are judicious." 



THINK OF IT 

4 ■ P0S-T1V-LY - 12 

FOUR WEEKS by our method teaching book-keeping is 
equal to TWELVE WEEKS by the old style. Positions 
guaranteed under certain conditions. Our "free" 56 and 80-page 
catalogues will explain "all." Send for them— Draughtons Bus- 
iness College and School of Shorthand and Telegraphy, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. CHEAP BOARD- No vacation. Enter any 
time. Address. J. F. Draughton, Pres't, Nashville, Tenn. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



EXCHANGES. 

The famous gymnasium formerly used by the Man- 
hattan Athletic Club has been leased for the use of 
Columbia College. 

The new gymnasium of the 1'niversity of Wisconsin 
will soon be opened. This is said to be one of the finest 
in the country. 

A recent freshman banquet at Cornell was prefaced 
by a free fight in the street before the banquet hall. 
During the banquet, chlorine gas was introduced into the 
room from below, causing the death of the cook, a colored 
woman. Several students were overcome but resuscitated 
by prompt medical aid. An investigation is being made 
which will lead to prosecution if the guilty parties are 
discovered. 

The editor of the Arena had promises to devote 
twenty-five pages a month to the discussion of the subject 
for that month, and The North American Review, and 
Public Opinion will give a large amount of space to the 
work. Thus those who debate will find plenty of material 
from which to gather facts. 

Prof. Mills Whittlesey, who held the chair of French 
and German in the college in 1883 and 1884, is now district 
manager for central and southern New Jersey of the 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company of Mil- 
waukee, with his headquarters at Trenton. A copy of The 
Insurance Solicitor, published by him. is on our table. 
Prof. Whittlesey has the characteristics to make a first- 
class insurance man. 

DEBATE SUBJECTS. 

A project has been entered into by Harvard, Yale. 
Princeton and Columbia which has as its object the 
enlisting of all schools and colleges in debating. Each 
of the institutions mentioned will elect representatvies to 
serve on a joint committee, which shall get out a list of 
subjects for debate and send them to the several schools 
and colleges that wish to follow the proposed plan. These 
subjects will be debated in each school or college at the 
same time, once every month, by the literary societise in 
each institution. 

Just at persent it is not proposed to have debates be- 
tween any of the colleges which shall be controlled by this 
movement, but merely that each literary society in all the 
schools and colleges be debating on the same subject at 
the same time in each month. It is proposed to try this 
plan in May and then get into regular running order by 
next October. 

It is hoped that the project will add impetus and 
attractiveness to debating throughout all the colleges of 
the land, and there seems to be no reason why it should 
not succeed. The assistance of the leadnig reviews and 
magazines will place an abundance of material within 



easy access of those who wish to debate, and the fact that 
the same question is being discussed all over the country 
at the same time will add much to the interest in the 
subject. — Ex. 

WHEN I GET'TIME. 

When I get time — 

I know what I shall do; 
I'll cut the leaves of all my books 

And oread them through and through. 

When I get time — 

I'll write some letters then 
That I have owed for weeks and weeks 
To many, many men. 

When I get time — 

I'll pay those calls I owe, 
And with those bills, those countless bills, 

I will not be so slow. 

When I get time — 

I'll regulate ray life 
In such a way that I may get 

Acquainted with my wife. 

When I get time — 

O, glorious dream of bliss! 
A month, a year, ten years from now— 

But I can't finish this — 
I have no time. 

Heads of great men all remind us, 
If we choose the proper way 

We can get up in the morning 
With a head as big as they. 

— Northwestern. 



DON'T 

get to thinking that times are too hard and 
church work must come to a stand still. If 
you are a successful pastor now is the time to 

MAKE 

a stir among your flock. The work of God's 
kingdom should sutler no delays. This recent 
flnancial crisis was due to lack of confidence. 

YOUR PULPIT 

is a place to help restore it. Stir up the 
young people. Get a rousing echo from the 



men corner. Start a church paper which shall 
go to every home and serve not only as a 

BULLETIN 

of church, society, and Sunday school, but 
shall give everyone of your flock something 
good to read and make them forget what next 
month's 

BOARD 

is going to cost them. We want to confer 
with you about printing that church paper so 
that it will bring you in a revenue. We will 
tell you how if you will write to 

FRED'K L CHAPMAN & CO.. 
Woman's Temple, Chicago. 



10 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



We submit the latest effort of the "Midnight Muse" 
Oh, editors, kind and true, 
Please tell me what to do, 
To still the awful howl and bark 
Of a dog at midnight drear and dark. 

— Teedie. 

To stop the howl no way we know, 
Put this might ease your woe; 
"When tired of listening to that, 
Change off and listen to the cat. 

— Mount Vernon Seminary Record. 

Or thus — if so we may remark — 
When wearied with howl and bored by bark. 
The festive tones of each midnight howler 
Are drowned with ease by another "growler." 

— Aegis. 



When all of these you try in vain, 
And howls and growls return again; 
Then to your window quickly run, 
And spring an all-round college pun. 

— S. U. I. Quill. 

And if this also fail the mark, 
And you should miss him in the dark. 
And if the howls be loud and deep, 
Why don"t you try to get some sleep'? 

— Buchtelite. 

If Morpheus stlil deny you sleep, 
•lust catch him with a midnight leap: 
Install him in your pony's bunk, 
lie may, some day, stand off a flunk. 
P. S. Our poet offers to produce it by the yard or by 
the ton. "Special rates to students." 



*HAT name is graven too 
deeply on this planet. 
You cannot erase it with 
your little sponge. 




"CHRIST 

IN 
CHICAGO" 



READ 



QTEAD'S . . . 

w GREAT BOOK 

of 400 pages Containing Startling 

Portraits of a Great City. 

" What she must do to be saved." 
A shocking but truthful story. 

A copy of the First Edition 

WILL BE SENT 

to anybody who will immediately address 

THE RAITS HORN 

Woman's Temple, Chicago 

Enclosing 50 cents in coin or stamps, for a 3 month's 

trial subscription to that famous weekly paper. 

The Ram's- Horn is showing the world that religious teaching need not be stupid nor commonplace. 

— Indianapolis Journal. 



i 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 



What's the matter? 

Watch stopped ! Feel lost ! 

Why wait till you can go to Chicago or Waukegan? 

GO TO FRENCH'S 

He will have it repaired in Chicago 
promptly, and in first=class style, and 
he will charge you only the regular 
Chicago rates Terms Cash 



TEHCHEBS G0-0PEHHT1VE flSSOfilBlH ,07 c 2 rr. ST 

Established in 1884. Positions filled, 3790. Seeks Teaohers who 

are ambitious for advancement rather than those without positions. 



The W. T. KEENER Co. 

Publishers, Importers and Dealers in 



Medical and i\nnFC f The 



'hicago 3 Leading Religious Weekly. 

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New Location New Rooms No better light in America 
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I can satisfy every customer. My photos are not excelled. Prices reasonable, a trial solicited 

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THE UNIVERSITY STENTOR 




GUITARS, 
Mandolins, Banjos, Zithers 
"Best in the World." 



Every 4; Washburn-' Instrument is 
the product of our special machin- 
ery and presents nobie character- 
istics. We stake our reputation 
upon their excellence. A beautiful 
"Washburn Souvenir Catalogue,^ 
containing portraits of leadin ; 
artists, andpricessnd full descrip- 
tions of thffi> instruments. Free. 




VICKPMIDf 




c 



F. C. CALVERT & SONS, 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS, 
ROSES. 

reasonable rates. Lake Forest. 



Four Grand 

POPPIES 

Jhirley, 

Brilliant, 
Tulip, 

Orientale. 

Over 1500 Planta 
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See Vick's Flo- 
ral Guide. 



rr^- 



The Pioneer Catalogue cf Vege- 
tables and Flowers. 
Contains 112 pages 8x10% 
inches, -with descriptions 
that describe, not mislead; 
illustrations that instruct, 
not exaggerate, 
. Its cover is charming in 
harmonious 1 lendingof v a- 
ter color prints in green and 
white, with a gold I a< k- 
ground —adreainol 1 eautv. 
32 pages of Novelties printed in 
8 different colors. All the lead- 
ing novelties and thelestofthe 
old varieties. These hard times 
you cannot afford to run any 
risk. Buy Honest Good* 
where you Mill receive Full 
Measure. It is not necessai v 
to advertise that Vicks' seed's 
groiv, this is known the world 
over, and also that the harvest 
pays. A very little spent for 
proper seed will save grocer's 
and doctor's bills. " Many 
concede Vick's Floral Guide 
the handsomest catalogue 
for 1834. If you love a tine 



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garden send address now. with 10 cents,' which maybe 
deducted from first order. $360 Cash Prizes for Potatoes 

Rochester, >.T. JAMES VICK'S SONS. 

Weban's Livery . . . 

Is the best place for Rigs and 
Sleighs. Lake Forest, 111. 



(Zhicago College 

- DENTAL SURGERY 

MICHIGAN AVENUE AND RANDOLPH ST., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

4 4 k k k 

FOR INFORMATION ADDRESS 

Dr. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean. 

96 STATE STREET. 



T 



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Makers of the Celebrated 



GLOBE GAS MACHINES. 

We always keep on hand a full line of Supplies for our Gas Machines 

52 and 54 LAKE STREET, CHICAGO. 



THE UNIVERSITY STENTQR. 

Mrs. A. Williams, P. BARSTOW, 



IRcstaurant anb 
Choice Confectionery 



Cement 
Sidewalks 



COAL 



Coke 
and Wood. 



ICE CREAM AND SALADS OF ALL KINDS — — 

MADE TO ORDER ^aaam^ 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY A SPECIALTY. 

OFFICE NEAR THE 

Lake Forest, III. genesee st. bridge 



MARBLE AND GRANITE MONUMENTS. 
BUILDING STONE, LIME AND CEMENT, 
SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, ETC. 



OPPOSITE R. R. DEPOT. 



Waukegan, 111. 



THOMAS F. HOWE. 



PRACTICAL 



Plumber . and . Gasfiitter 



SANITARY WORK 
A SPECIALTY. 





3 k Days 



Lake Forest, 



ois. 



•Jflorman 3. IRobcits 

Cental 
Surgeon 



Waufteoan, 



Ullmois. 



FROM CHICAGO. 

All meals served 
in Dining Cars. 

Palace Drawing- 
Room Sleeping Cars 
and Tourist Sleepers 
are run through to 
San Francisco 
without charage, 
leaving Chicago 
^daily via the 

IMorth-Western Line 

OHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN RV. 



Variable 
Route 

Tourist tickets 
allowing privi- 
leges never be- 
fore accorded, 
can be obtained 
with full infor- 
mation, upon 
application to 
any ticket 
agent, or to the 
General Pass- 
enger Agent, 
CHICAGO. 



A.H. Abbott &Co. 

50 MADISON ST. 

DRAWING MATERALS 

ARTISTS' MATERIAL 
MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS 
ART NOVELTIES 
STUDIES FOR COPYING 

J^obert Mercer, 

LAKE FOREST, ILL- 

CIGARS 

TOBACCO 

PIPES (ind 

STATIONERY 

AGENT FOR ALL 
CHICAGO NEWSPAPERS. 



J. Q. CORNISH, 

DEALER IN 

♦ FINE ♦ CARRIAGES ♦ PHAETONS 

Top Buggies, Road Carts. 

AND MANUFACTURER OF 

SUPERIOR GRADE OF HARNESS. 

Waukegan, 111. 



Fred Palmer 



Manufacturer and dealer in 



* HARNESS 

CARRIAGE. TRIMMINGS, 

BLANKETS, Etc. DOIIC 

Waukegan, 111. 



"Seeing is Believing:." 




Simple, Beautiful, Good — 

these words mean much, but to 

see "The Rochester" will impress 

the truth more forcibly. Its mar- 
? velous light is purer and brighter 

than gas light, softer than electric 
light, a